Echo ES1000 Blower Rebuild

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-05-10, 09:09 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 3
Echo ES1000 Blower Rebuild

My older Echo blower was not coming up in RPM; the shop suggested the possibility of a blown gasket...I purchased all the gaskets, new plug including piston ring, needed to rebuild the engine completely and did so. It will now not start and I am wondering if there is some timing issue that I am not aware of...I have been told these simple 2 stroke engines do not need to be timed but I do not seem to be getting a spark at the end of the sparkplug lead but have continuity from the switch to the end of the lead. What is the best way to determine if I have adequate spark and the magneto is working? Fuel seems fine...and I positioned the piston head arrow toward the intake side..anyone offer some help??
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-06-10, 05:58 AM
Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Iowa!!!!!
Posts: 3,728
Anytime you have just the ignition module (current coil = armature) in the ignition, you essentially have a two component system - the module and the flywheel. With the module fixed and properly gapped (usually .010-.012 on most) you would have a spark when you spin it over. With that in place you just have to have the flywheel key fitted to the slot on the crank.

If nothing, disconnect the kill switch wire, then if nothing, try a new plug well grounded. Then if nothing the module is likely bad = not cheap so make sure you test it thoroughly.
 
  #3  
Old 11-06-10, 06:13 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Kingsport, TN
Posts: 217
To test, remove the spark plug and ground it to the cylinder head with alligator clips or some other means. Pull the starter cord and see if you see a spark across the plug's gap. If there is an on/off switch, make sure it is in the 'on' position.

As previous poster noted, check gap between flywheel and pickup. I had one increase over time until the engine would not run.
 
  #4  
Old 11-06-10, 09:22 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 3
Thanks for the comments; this model is a shredder/vac and I took the kill switch out of the loop by connecting the two wires together. It was really annoying as it wouldn't stay closed. The unit ran fine just 5 days ago before rebuild. Is the spark really noticeable in the plug gap? I know it is in a bigger lawnmower engine. Marbobji, am I reading your comments correct that I will also see a spark between the module and flywheel when pulled through with the cover off? The module screws directly to the engine base frame and does not appear adjustable. I also have the ground wire hooked to the screw that mounts the module as this is where it appeared to go..it touches the outside the module, could this be a problem? The gap between the module and flywheel is very small. Lastly, again the question of timing. Does the starter rope assembly, which nests into the Pawl assembly and starter pawl, have to go in a certain way...it has a little plastic switch that is spring loaded. That is, does the piston have to be located at a specific place when you mate these two assemblies together? Again, I appreciate all your helpful clarifications -
 
  #5  
Old 11-06-10, 10:19 AM
Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Iowa!!!!!
Posts: 3,728
No, the only spark you will get is at the center electrode of the spark plug to the ground of the plug. Naturally, the whole plug has to be well grounded. The two components I mentioned are the ones that generate the voltage to create the spark at the spark plug tip. The ignition module should have a single wire going to the ground. Just disconnect that wire and make sure it isn't touching anything.

If you're splicing the two wires at the kill switch you won't get a spark. That in effect grounds the ignition - you don't want that.

The only thing that times the spark is the flywheel keyed at the slot in the crank shaft where it mounts.

For the armature (coil) gap use a business card. Rotate the magnets on the flywheel away from the coil, put the card between the flywheel and coil, turn the flywheel so the magnets align with the coil, loosen the mounting screws on the coil, let the magnets draw the coil down against the card, tighten the mounting screws of the coil, and finally rotate the flywheel magnets away from the coil and remove the card.
 
  #6  
Old 11-06-10, 12:39 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 3
Thanks for the prompt response, Marbobj, I appreciate your help. Have set the gap at the armature. Sounds like my taking the kill switch out has screwed something up. Is there a way to wire around the kill switch so the unit will still work? Before, it was located inside the plastic cover for the shred attachment and was always flipping loose, stopping the blower. Isn't just wiring the two entry wires into the kill switch just bypassing the switch? Sorry to sound dense, I tend to understand the mechanical side but not the electrical...what would you recommend I do now?
 
  #7  
Old 11-06-10, 03:32 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Iowa!!!!!
Posts: 3,728
The ignition kills with a grounded circuit. Simply leaving the wire disconnected at the module will give you spark - all parts good.

If you were to take that wire and connect it to a flip switch with two terminals and run a wire from the other terminal to a ground on the engine it would take care of what the original kill switch did.

When you connected the two wires together you completed the circuit to ground = perpetual kill.
 
  #8  
Old 04-18-12, 08:18 AM
ryn0909's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1
did you ever figure out whats wrong with that blower? if memory serves me correctly, the arrow ontop the piston indicates the direction of flow, so it should be facing the exhaust port.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes