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Hydraulic Filter on Wood Splitter


jwatts's Avatar
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02-20-11, 09:26 PM   #1  
Hydraulic Filter on Wood Splitter

I want to install an inline hydraulic filter on the inlet side of the pump on my wood splitter but most of the filter heads and filters I've found on line are rated at around 150 to 200 psi. Don't most wood splitters operate at somewhere between 1500 and 3000 psi?
My wood splitter is an older home built unit but it's pretty heavy duty. It has a 16hp engine and a 5" by 34" cylinder. I cant find a brand name on the pump to get info on it. The spool valve is a Gresen # 2701 if that tells you anything.
Would anyone happen to know what the correct psi rating may be for a filter head and filter for a machine like this and where I could buy these?
I'd sure be grateful for any help.

Thanks, jwatts

 
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02-20-11, 09:34 PM   #2  
The filter goes on the suction line to the pump. The 1500+ psi is on the discharge side of the pump. I don't have a lot of hydraulics experience (some) and I don't recall ever seeing a filter anywhere but on the suction piping. As long as the reservoir is vented to atmosphere there will be no high pressure on the suction side.

 
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02-21-11, 02:50 PM   #3  
I will back Furd up,

Filters are placed to filter oil before it enters the pump not after.....

 
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02-21-11, 07:00 PM   #4  
Thanks for responding to my questions even though none of them were answered . I understand the concept of filtering the oil before it enters the pump. That's why I wrote as my first sentence " I want to install an inline hydraulic filter on the " inlet " side of the pump. "
The question I need answered was in regard to the correct psi rating and flow rate for the filter head and filter. When the filter is installed on the inlet (or suction) side of the pump it's very important that the flow rate on the filter is correlated with the flow rate of the pump. If the flow rate of the filter is too restrictive (lower than the pump) it can cause cavitation in the pump which will damage it severly and cause you to say bad words.
I don't mean this to sound like I'm being a jerk because I'm very, very grateful that you guys gave your time and effort to try to help me. I very much appreciate your kindness. Maybe I didn't word my question as it should have been.
I'm in total agreement with you that the most effective placement for a filter is on the intake side of whatever you're trying to protect. However, on the many web sites I visited in this endeavor I noticed there are just as many or more filter assemblies made for return lines as there are for intake lines. As a matter of fact I've seen some wood splitters that have filters on both lines and some that don't have any at all. I guess there are as many different types of setups as there are opinions. Some say in a closed loop it dosen't really matter where your filter is because it circulates.
I think before I go any farther I need to do some more research to try to find some specs for my pump. I found some numbers on it but not a brand name. I was hoping there was more or less a general flow rate for filters that are used on the larger type splitters. Maybe not.
Anyway, thanks again for your attempts to help.
Best regards,
jwatts

 
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02-21-11, 07:53 PM   #5  
Of course the filter (suction filter) has to be sized to the rated pump flow, that's a given. You sure wouldn't use a filter with 1/4 inch ports on a suction line to a pump that had 1-1/4 inch fittings. The pump on your splitter probably doesn't flow any more than 7-10 gpm under the best of conditions and likely considerably less. A filter with a 20 gpm flow rate is fairly common.

Return line filters are less common, especially on cylinders. The pressure in a return line is almost entirely related to the size (diameter) of the line with the smaller lines having greater pressure with the same flow rate.

So, pick a filter head that has the same size ports as the suction hose and you will be fine. Pressure rating is pretty much irrelevant but be certain the filter is rated as a suction line filter. The micron rating of the element shouldn't be too small or you will have an excessive pressure drop across the element. It's been too many decades since I played with hydraulic systems but probably something in the 150 to 150 micron rating would be fine for a suction filter.

 
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