gas string trimmers ?

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-05-11, 07:07 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: sw sub chicago
Posts: 1,130
gas string trimmers ?

i am considering getting a gas string trimmer. but idk much about them.

1, what are the good and bad brands ? reliability, etc.
2, what engine ?
3, straight head or curved ?
4, line feeding ?

anything else ?

thanx
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-05-11, 07:24 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 20,977
There's a good article in the latest consumer reports that covers gas, electric and cordless. If you have a small lot I'd go with a corded unit....much less hassle and maintenance.

I think I still have it around...I'll check and get back to you.
 
  #3  
Old 06-05-11, 07:46 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: sw sub chicago
Posts: 1,130
thanx, that would be great.

i am getting cordless either way. i am not going to be dragging around a cord.
and i figure that gas would have a longer duty cycle.

i was told to get a 4 cycle, as they are quieter. but if reliability is lower. i will get a 2 cycle and earmuffs.
 
  #4  
Old 06-05-11, 09:14 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 20,977
Ok..it was the May CR issue...and it looks like they just tested residential stuff...so it should fit yer needs. Think Popular Mechanics also had an article recently...might want to check their website.

Stihl FS 45, FS 40CE, and FS 45C were at the top of the list ($150-190). Echo SRM225 and GT225 were right after ($220 and 170).

They only tested the Black and Decker 24 and 36V models...said the 24 worked OK and was lighter than the 36. Both are cheaper than any gas models...but they only run 15 min or so...and then there's that battery issue. Will it be ready when you need it and how much are replacements?

Dunno about the 2 vs 4 cycle...I know 4's are heavier as a rule. Back when I had grass, I bought Ryobi...and they worked just fine. Last one I had was something like 5 yrs old and still worked when I moved and gave it away. I also liked the multi-attachments you could get. Think Homelite has something similar.
 
  #5  
Old 06-05-11, 11:05 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,399
I know the cord is a hassle but I'm still using the Weedeater (509 I think) that I bought back in 1978.

I like the infomercial for the Worx GT (or maybe I just like Robin Hartl) but the reviews are mixed. I might get one and then cobble a cord and power supply because it seems the battery is the weak point. Or maybe I'll make a battery vest.
 
  #6  
Old 06-05-11, 05:21 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: sw sub chicago
Posts: 1,130
thanx

what about the straight vs curved shaft ?
 
  #7  
Old 06-05-11, 06:01 PM
cheese's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 16,815
For reliability, service, and longevity, I recommend Stihl or Echo. For consumer grade products, I think I'd opt for Echo. There are many other good products out there, but service and/or quality can be spotty.

Straight or curved is more of a personal preference. Curved shafts allow me to angle the cut toward the ground easily along fences and things like that, but I like my trim work angled down like that. Some people don't. Hold a couple of them and see how easily you can maneuver them. I personally prefer curved for trimming around objects, straight for cutting grass like around a pond and places where the mower isn't practical.

2 stroke gives more power and less weight. I prefer 2 stroke myself. Some of them are pretty quiet.
 
  #8  
Old 06-09-11, 05:46 PM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 373
With the straight head, you can also cut a bigger path. My front yard is very small, and some time I will cut the front with just the weed eater.
 
  #9  
Old 06-09-11, 07:28 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: St. Louis
Posts: 2,365
My $0.02, the normal homeowner can do very well with the current level of cordless trimmers, my sis says her and the battery run out at about the same time, corded models have the cord to mess with, homeowners that maintain their lawn equipment can do well with gas models of trimmers, those that don't should stay away from gas trimmers, gas trimmers are less forgiving than a lawnmower. The cheapest lawnmower is about $150 from wallyworld, a gas trimmer for about $60, if both are maintained the mower will last 10 years and the trimmer 5, if not maintained the mower will last 5, the trimmer will last 1. Straight shaft vs curved, clutched vs non-clutched I think it is personal preference, I'm 6'2 and don't like curved shafts because it seems I need to bend to get a good balance and cutting angle, maybe it's just me. I have so many trimmers I use a different one each mowing just so they don't feel ignored. The only Echo I have is a Mac60 Kioritz, very,very old it has points and condenser. Stihl FS85 (2) straight, Stihl FS45, Stihl FS46 curved, Redmax (model missing) straight, Poulan Pro (orange) straight, IDC 580 Supreme straight. Trimmers without a clutch are only good when everything is good and the stars aligned, when they work you can trim at an idle, however, when the line gets caught in the fence, the engine is locked and the drive cable breaks or the flywheel key gets sheared. Maybe that was more than $0.02. Have a good one. Geo
 
  #10  
Old 06-10-11, 01:00 PM
bontai Joe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 592
My 25 plus year old corded electric trimmer just died on me, I looked at the battery models, and they cost more than twice what the corded models cost, almost what a gas trimmer costs. Now if you can buy one that uses the same battery as other tools you own, that makes it more attractive as the batteries can be kept fresh for multiple uses and go thru the proper discharge/recharge cycle to keep them healthy and have longer life. I don't have other battery tools, so I went with a corded model. My thinking was that not using the battery over the winter would mean expensive replacements every year or 2. I see people moan about dragging the cord around, but I use a 100' 14 ga. extension cord and I don't really mind it. The pluses are minimal maintenance is required (clean the vents in the motor housing once in a while), very quiet, no smell, light weight, total reliability, and lower initial cost. I maintain two 1 acre plus lawns and use an electric trimmer on both. I'd have to get back into doing lawns commercially again for me to consider a gas unit. Keep in mind that my last one cost somewhere around $40 back in the late 1980's and I was able to replace it with a better, stronger one for less than $40 now (on sale for father's day at Sears). $40 over 25 years = $1.60 a year and no gas to buy, mix or store, no spark plugs, no air filters. Just something for you to consider.
 
  #11  
Old 06-10-11, 01:34 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 17,756
I don't know what your budget is but I have two gas line trimmers a Honda and a Stihl, both are 4-stroke. The Honda (35 size) is my favorite. It starts easy, is quiet, idles like a dream, can be easily run at low & mid rpm's and takes straight gasoline (no mixing oil). The Stihl even though a 4 stroke requires the same mixed fuel as their other 2 stroke products and it's louder than the Honda. It starts easy and idles well but just does not seem happy at less than full throttle but what a brute for power. So, the Honda is great for lighter duty around the house grass trimming but when I have to really cut through heavy stuff the Stihl's extra power is a big help. I've had the Honda for 4 years and the Stihl for 3 and neither has required any repairs and they actually start easier now that they are broken in than they did when new.
 
  #12  
Old 07-21-11, 06:29 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: sw sub chicago
Posts: 1,130
i now have this one
Stihl FS 55 R Trimmer
FS 55 R STIHL - Occasional Use Straight Shaft Trimmer | STIHL
 
  #13  
Old 07-22-11, 05:22 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Hamilton County, Ohio
Posts: 4,288
That looks like a beauty. It should run for many seasons. Just be sure to follow the off season storage procedures and it should fire right up the following spring.
 
  #14  
Old 07-23-11, 06:17 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: sw sub chicago
Posts: 1,130
it is. i haven't used it much. i did try it at my moms house. but the string stopped feeding.
i thought i had run out. later i took the head off. i found that it had plenty of string. but 1 turn was somehow bonded together inside, so it wouldn't feed. i loosened it up. then it worked fine. i will try it out again today.

10-4 on the storage.
 
  #15  
Old 07-23-11, 06:22 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: sw sub chicago
Posts: 1,130
oh

look at the pic. between the loop handle and the trigger. there is a black fluted sleeve, that turns and slides up & down between. what is that for ?
 
  #16  
Old 07-23-11, 12:09 PM
cheese's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 16,815
I think it's mostly a protector for the unit when stored on a weedeater rack on a truck or trailer.
 
  #17  
Old 07-24-11, 07:56 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: sw sub chicago
Posts: 1,130
hmm, didn't think if that.

anyway. i am having problems with this thing. it runs great. but the line feeder keeps screwing up. the first time it jammed, the line inside somehow stuck together. freed that up, but it is still not letting line feed out. first 1 side, sometimes both sides.

idk what to do. perhaps new line.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes