Poulon 260 Pro chainsaw hard to pull

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  #1  
Old 11-25-11, 09:03 AM
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Poulon 260 Pro chainsaw hard to pull

Another of my swap meet purchases : (

This one is a Poulon chainsaw that is near impossible to pull to try and start.

Removed the spark plug and it pulls easy. Replace the plug and I can only get small increments. Not near enough of a full pull to make a spark.

I've read all kinds of things can cause this from clogged spark arrester to vapor lock in the gas tank to flywheel out of alignment.

Can anyone advise what I should look for.

Thanks
 
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Old 11-25-11, 01:22 PM
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Did some more research. This "hard to pull rope" issue seems fairly common for chainsaws, in particular.

The consensus seems to be flooding of the cylinder with fuel. Seems even a drop of liguid gas can prevent the piston from reaching TDC.

The fix is to remove the spark plug, dray it with a clean towel and let it sit out for a while to allow the fuel to completely evaporate.

If the chainsaw has been sitting with gas for a while... like after the winter... suggestions are to first remove any old fuel from the tank and carb. Remove the hose from the carb to the tank/filter and let the gas drain back into the tank.

Remove the spark plug and turn the tool so the hole is facing down. Let it sit this way for a few hours pulling on the rope every once in a while to cause any fuel in the lines to be sucked out.

Install fresh mix, connect the fuel line to the carb, replace the plug and attempt to start.

Now I also found a second way to start chainsaws that seem to jam up this way...

This method works like this...

Do not use the primer. With choke fully on, pull the rope until you hear a single pop... an attempt to start.

Stop!

Turn choke off. Pull rope and it should start in 1 to 3 pulls.
 
  #3  
Old 11-25-11, 04:26 PM
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Your trouble is pointing to fuel dumping into the engine via the carburetor. In other words, the carburetor is not stopping fuel flow as it should. What happens is fuel passes past the inlet needle and seat without the necessary vacuum created by the engine spinning over (while at rest) and floods the crankcase. Being a two stroke engine you likely won't find any fuel on top of the piston (as you would on a four stroke) but rather in the crankcase. If my diagnosis is correct, you will need to not only remove all excess fuel (all) from the engine but you will also need to clean and recondition the carburetor.
 
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Old 11-25-11, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by outdoormike View Post
Another of my swap meet purchases : (

This one is a Poulon chainsaw that is near impossible to pull to try and start.

Removed the spark plug and it pulls easy. Replace the plug and I can only get small increments. Not near enough of a full pull to make a spark.

I've read all kinds of things can cause this from clogged spark arrester to vapor lock in the gas tank to flywheel out of alignment.

Can anyone advise what I should look for.

Thanks
Hello,
I had a saw to repair like this last winter. It was given to me by a buddy, and with the same symptoms as you describe. I ended up treating this saw with some SEA FOAM. ( suspecting carbon build-up) I had nothing to loose so i actually poured the Sea foam into the cylinder and let it "soak" overnight. As unorthodox as that sounds,the saw ran perfectly after it was cleaned out and properly fueled. I do advise however that you follow the manufacturer recommended instructions for this product.
I hope this helps!
 
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Old 11-28-11, 08:18 AM
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Your theory about the fuel in the bottom of the engine... is this what is known as hydraulic lock?

On your advice I am going to order a rebuild kit for this Walbro carb and go from there.

Will report back when I get the parts installed.

Thanks : )
 
  #6  
Old 11-29-11, 06:20 AM
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Yes, that is hydraulic lock. If it is as such, this is because you cannot compress fluids.
 
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