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Leaky front tires on riding lawnmower


old fisherman's Avatar
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03-27-12, 08:22 AM   #1  
Leaky front tires on riding lawnmower

I am looking for suggestions on a quick fix to the problem of my front tires on my riding lawn mower leaking down every few days. I am hoping to avoid having to put tubes in them.

 
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03-27-12, 08:25 AM   #2  
Depends on how the air is getting out. Leaky valve stem, rusty bead? If neither of those you might try some of the green slime stuff you can put in to seal small leaks.


Measure it with a micrometer; cut it with an ax.

 
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03-27-12, 08:29 AM   #3  
The problem has been happening since the mower was new. I see no sign of rusty rims and I have moved the valve stem around without hearing any sound of air escaping. Where can you get the slime stuff you are speaking of? I have tried fixing a similar problem with my wheelbarrow tire using "fix-a-flat" and it worked poorly.

 
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03-27-12, 08:33 AM   #4  
Take them off, pump them up and plunk them in a bucket of water to find where the air is escaping.

 
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03-27-12, 10:08 AM   #5  
First, locate the leak. If it's a thorn or nail puncturing it then a plug patch kit from any auto store should work.

Personally I'd put tubes in them and be done with it. Just make sure to inspect for thorns or anything else that may be puncturing the tire.

 
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03-27-12, 08:41 PM   #6  
You can find slime at walmart or any auto parts store. Honestly, even without a leak it is good prevention for tires that never see high speed. Even when a puncture happens, if it installed it self seal. It will not repair rotted side walls, (ok it will with some persuasion) but it will fix slow leaks.

I use an old dish washing detergent bottle, mix in some soap and water and sponge it around suspect areas. (Valve stem and beads) if no bubbles then the tank method is the best to locate.


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03-27-12, 08:44 PM   #7  
Front tires should be 15X6.0-6 on most mowers. Tubes for that would run $7 each or so and take 10 minutes each to install. Slime will run you about that much and may or may not work, and if it doesn't you have a heap of a nasty mess to try to work in and with to get tubes in them anyway and you'll be out more $$ and work than you would have been.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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03-27-12, 09:03 PM   #8  
Maybe in your neck of the woods or lack of cheese
Tubes here are 12 bux with discount and then the labor and tire breakdown....guess tires don't succumb the weather so much in a constant environment though, might be easier to break down but, without the equipment 10 minutes is just not practical.


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03-27-12, 09:39 PM   #9  
Well, 10 minutes for me, but I have done a few. I only use 2 prybars and a long socket extension. Tubes are a little cheaper than that for me. They're under $7 on ebay.


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03-27-12, 10:11 PM   #10  
I imagine you have and no doubt can do ten flat
I use motorcycle tools myself, but have used slime on my own rear tires on an old MTD I use for briars that the rear wheels will not come off the shafts without...well u know...they were weather checked on the sidewalls and I used slime on them. They sealed with lots of air pressure and continuous rotation during use. It did take a while, but I have not added air to them now in at least 2 if not 3 seasons.
I would not recommend fix a flat as it is can be dangerous and explosive according to the lable. It is also very messy when changing. Only advantage is it does provide air in a can as slime does not. Slime is a fairly easy cleanup imo in comparison.
I have also used similar products to slime, Napa sells one, and have had similar luck.
Your mileage may vary, and I agree the best fix is a tube and or new tire.


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