NGK BPR6ES Plug

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  #1  
Old 01-14-13, 01:35 PM
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NGK BPR6ES Plug

I went to a Honda dealer today to get a spark plug for a Honda engine I am working on. They told me that NGK no longer makes the BPR6ES plug. I find this hard to believe. Has anyone else heard this. They gave me a BPR5ES plug. I think they gave me a bunch of BS.
 
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Old 01-14-13, 01:40 PM
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Still available on Amazon:
NGK BPR6ES Spark Plug, Pack of 1 : Amazon.com : Automotive

Couldn't find anything quickly which confirmed on contradicted the story you were told.
 
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Old 01-14-13, 08:01 PM
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I wouldn't want an NGK in mine anyway... get a champion or autolite equivalent for more reliability.
 
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Old 01-15-13, 03:56 AM
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Thanks guys -- I have a champion RN9YC ready to go.
 
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Old 01-15-13, 04:56 AM
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Just wondering whats wrong with NGK?

I run them in the Harley.......Only plug I can find with different temp ranges sold local to prevent detonation in the hot summer months.....
 
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Old 01-15-13, 09:42 AM
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Funny about NGK plugs. It has been my experience that they do not hold up well in Honda small gasoline engines. Many of the Honda engines that come into my small shop sputtering are a result of a bad NGK plug. In fact I have a GX200 in right now. However they have worked great in both the Nissan and Honda automobiles that I have owned. The plugs went well over 100,000 miles and still looked and performed great. Go figure
 
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Old 01-15-13, 09:49 AM
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I think NGK has somehow gotten into that love/hate category - some people love them, some hate them but few people have an opinion in-between.
 
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Old 01-15-13, 03:55 PM
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I don't mind them in an automobile. I don't want them in a small engine. If a fuel injection system, the plug doesn't have a chance to get "gassed". There is no choke or leaky needle/seat, so no chance of flooding. If a rich condition ever occurs, an NGK plug will go bad and still spark, but not at the right times. It will pop and sputter. There is a 2 or 3 page thread in this forum about honda engines sputtering and shutting off and it being the fault of the NGK plug that it comes with. Very common problem.
 
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Old 01-15-13, 05:32 PM
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There is no choke or leaky needle/seat, so no chance of flooding. If a rich condition ever occurs, an NGK plug will go bad and still spark, but not at the right times. It will pop and sputter.
Hmmm...I am carbed on my harley... 45 mm mikuni. Choke and all... I would like to see some data that shows the plug as the fault.

I looked around and could not find anything....
 
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Old 01-15-13, 09:46 PM
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Here you go: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/ou...ing-out-3.html

3 pages worth, and I have personally seen many cases of the same, not just in honda engines.
 
  #11  
Old 01-18-13, 07:57 AM
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Plugs

Hey cheese,

How you doing? I don't know if you remember but I used to help moderate this forum category and 3 others sometime around 2002. My user name was mike merritt.

On this plug thing its funny how people have vastly different experiences. In 40+ years I see no difference in performance among the major plug makes when used in small gas engines. I do some 4 wheeler work and NGK is the only plug that resists gas fouling. It may be that living in the deep south our engines don't have to operate in the serious cold.

See you guys around,

networker AKA mike merritt
 
  #12  
Old 01-18-13, 02:41 PM
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Yeah, Hi Mike! I remember. It was that long ago? wow.

I can't explain for the differences. I guess use what works. Did you read the posts in the link I provided? When I get an engine that has a bad spark plug, it's almost always an NGK or chinese no-name. They might do better in 4-wheelers and other items, I don't know. I don't work on them (much anyway... I try to avoid them as I'm not set up for them). I never had problems with them in auto engines. I was an auto technician for Chrysler/Plymouth/Dodge back in the early '90s for a few years and I don't think I ever had a opinion at all about NGK. Not until several years after I started my small engine shop did I begin to realize that NGKs were problematic (at least in certain applications). The funny thing is you'll pull the plug and check for spark, and it'll be a nice repeating crisp spark, but it just isn't at the right time. I don't know how the plug can change timing, but there is something that happens. The engine will pop and backfire, start and die, do all sorts of weird things that make you think it has carb or ignition trouble, till you put a new plug in and it runs perfectly. When NGKs fail, that's how they do it in my experience. I've learned that if it acts strange and I see an NGK, change it before I do anything else. That fixes it more often than not.
 
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