chainsaw bar lubrication point(s)

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-25-13, 10:56 AM
sgull's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: AK
Posts: 2,586
chainsaw bar lubrication point(s)

I'm familiar with lubricating the chainsaw bar tip sprocket at the opposite end of the bar of what's shown in this picture, but it looks as if on this end of the bar there also lubrication ports (one as being pointed to with the pencil, and another one on the flip side of the bar next to the other edge of the bar). I guess when I lube here, it's so that the chain groove of the bar gets lubed? I'd like to be clear on this, as it's not mentioned in the operators manual for my chainsaw, as is the bar tip sprocket lube port. thanks
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-25-13, 11:06 AM
Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Iowa!!!!!
Posts: 3,728
The lube goes from the pump through the ports you're pointing at, to the groove on the bar for the chain guide, then to the chain/sprocket on the bar tip, etc. Centrifugal force throws the lube throughout the chain.

Usually when I'm cutting alot of wood I'll put a couple drops directly onto the end sprocket when I fill the oil reserve.

If you want to check the lubing of the chain just hold the end of the bar close to a piece of wood with the engine running and rev the saw. It should throw a light line of lube onto the wood.
 
  #3  
Old 04-25-13, 11:14 AM
sgull's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: AK
Posts: 2,586
Okay thanks marbobj. I wasn't sure if I was expected to lube those ports with the special little grease gun I use to inject grease into the bar tip sprocket lube point. But I understand now that you've explained; these ports are from where the bar oil enters as it's pumped. thanks
 
  #4  
Old 04-25-13, 11:29 AM
sgull's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: AK
Posts: 2,586
Also I was wondering about these lubrication instructions as shown in my manual. It says to drip engine oil into those locations where the arrows point. At the chainsaw store the guy recommended I use this stuff https://secure.flickr.com/photos/brianyohn/8566115638 periodically on the saw but I'm unclear where this is supposed to be applied as compared to the lube instructions here in this picture.
The sprocket bearing grease says its for "sprocket nose bearings", "drive sprocket bearings", among a few other things.
 
  #5  
Old 04-25-13, 12:17 PM
sgull's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: AK
Posts: 2,586
Was able to locate this video which shows (at about the 1:56 point in the video) the insertion of a "piston stop tool" so that I can strike the drive sprocket as shown and get it unscrewed off. Well I don't have this special tool, so without it I'm probably gonna be unable to do this otherwise. any advice/comment in that regard appreciated. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdqkIuVNUQc
My Husqvarna saw is similar as in the video, but not the exact model as shown. My model happens to be the 445. The drive sprocket situation/design is the same as shown in the video.
 
  #6  
Old 04-25-13, 02:40 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Iowa!!!!!
Posts: 3,728
The Stihl grease is for the end sprocket. Usually the Stihl stuff is as good as it gets.

The drive sprocket (just off the end of the engine crank) is what they want a couple of drops dripped into. Some ask for that and some don't. I've had a number of saws and only used a paste grease (like high temp wheel bearing grease) on that bearing whenever I had it apart. That bearing only spins when the clutch is disengaged. When you're cutting it's fixed - so it really doesn't take a lot of lube.

For the drive sprocket don't put more than a couple drops in that bearing. You don't want to get lube on the drive clutch inside the drum.
 
  #7  
Old 04-25-13, 02:43 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Iowa!!!!!
Posts: 3,728
You're just wanting to take off the drive clutch? That will turn off in reverse of the direction of engine rotation. You can drift it off pretty easy with a soft metal drift (brass or aluminum) if you have it. Or you can stuff a nylon rope down the plug hole for a piston stop.
 
  #8  
Old 04-25-13, 03:00 PM
sgull's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: AK
Posts: 2,586
you can stuff a nylon rope down the plug hole for a piston stop.
Good idea. I'll go that route for the piston stop. I've done that before with a small engine I recall, worked pretty good, but I had forgotten about that.
Also, I was just going to mention for the tip sprocket I use this type of grease gun that uses this type of grease, not the Stihl lithium base sprocket bearing grease in the orange tube. http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/b...ps42be4d3f.jpg
Okay thanks marbobj for your helpful replies.
 
  #9  
Old 04-25-13, 06:19 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Iowa!!!!!
Posts: 3,728
Most of the time you don't have to use the piston stop. Just give the drift a sharp rap with a light hammer. With that pressed metal cap the light hammer has all it needs to unscrew it.

When you use the nylon rope make sure the engine is cold. When you're done spin the engine over a couple of times to blow out any nylon shavings that may have come off the rope.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes