snow blower maintenance

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-23-13, 04:47 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: usa
Posts: 71
Question snow blower maintenance

I have craftsman snow blower 26" model 247.886911 I have a few questions which I cant seem to find answers. (I do have the manual but still need clarification)
1. Besides draining the gas out the tank, is there another valve to drain gas out of the gas lines/ carburetor? 1a. should I run stable fuel in my system first then drain it?
2. Gear Shaft - Do I just apply engine oil to the shaft or anywhere else?(bar going across?)
3. Auger Shaft - there are no zerk fittings on the auger, so how do I grease this and with what kind of grease? The manual does not say.
4. The book says to take the spark plug out and squirt 1.oz of clean oil inside, is that correct? into the spark plug hole?
5. Someone mentioned to me about spraying WD40 on my machine,where would I do that?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-24-13, 04:29 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,541
I'm not fimiliar with that exact model of blower, so....
On the blowers I've owned, I've always been able to drain the fuel from the valve on the bottom of the carb. That being said, I am 100% against doing this. draining the fuel will allow for gaskets to dry and dry gaskets crack. Nothing worse then fighting with a blower that won't start or run right when it's cold and snowy.
I run premium fuel in my carburated tools/toys. It generally won't go nasty on you in 6 months time so I just leave what is in the lines there. Some will run stablizer, but it's not really required for a short time now. Just siphon the tank and leave what is in the lines and carb there is my suggestion.
If your model has greese fittings (all mine did), touch them up with greese. Besides that, I'll clean and greese all sliding/moving parts with with chassi/bearing greese and call it a day. Just be careful not to get any on any friction parts.
I'm not a fan of putting oil in the head of engines that will only sit for a bit. It will foul plugs and if you put too much, can create a hydro-lock. I know people I know do put a little 2-stroke oil in the head, and replace the plug while it sits. Come start time, remove the plug, pull it over a few times, wipe up and mess and replace the plug.

As for the WD40... It's wasting your time. WD40 is a water displacement agent and really will evaporate before the day is done. It's also flamable, so keep it away from anything that will get hot in the near future after use.
 
  #3  
Old 06-24-13, 05:56 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 628
The blower

Any blower with a rubber disc drive should stored in neutral, so you won't have a possible flat spot on the disc.
Sid
 
  #4  
Old 06-24-13, 06:23 AM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 4,297
I'd use fogging oil not motor oil in the cylinder.
Fogging Oil 12oz 84812 - product summary - Bing Shopping
That's what it's made for.

Think leaving the gas drained out of the system will dry out the gaskets, wait until you see what happens when you leave ethanol fuel in it with no additive to counter act the effects of it. It will turn the gaskets to a rock hard mess.
WD does not evaporate only the propellant will.
I use this instead to coat everything that might rust.
Heavy Duty Corrosion Inhibitor, 10 Wt Oz - Product Information
Make sure to change the oil.
 
  #5  
Old 06-24-13, 06:51 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,541
Originally Posted by joecaption1
Think leaving the gas drained out of the system will dry out the gaskets, wait until you see what happens when you leave ethanol fuel in it with no additive to counter act the effects of it. It will turn the gaskets to a rock hard mess.
This is not an issue for only 6-8 months with the newer gas formulas.
I've been storing my snow blower and other yard tools and toys this way. The only difference being for winter storage, keep the fuel tank topped up as much as possible. The less air in the tank, the less condensation.
Now, if storing for years, I'd consider fogging or alternate storage methods.
 
  #6  
Old 06-25-13, 01:12 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 4
check the carburetor for a float bowl there usually a drain fuel adjustment valve
you can take out or unscrew to drain the gas from the bowl or what I do is drain it from the tank then start it and let it run at idle until it uses up the fuel in the bowl and fuel line no mess to clean up
if there are no grease fittings for the shafts there not much u can do
you could spray wd40 on bolts and other exposed steel areas that get hit by the snow I wouldn't spray the whole thing spraying shafts wouldn't hurt either especially if there bare steel and the bolts that hold the shaft assemblies together, I wouldn't use the fogging oils in the cylinder unless its goin to be stored for a year or more
 
  #7  
Old 06-29-13, 07:17 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: usa
Posts: 71
@Northern MIke

What kind of grease do I use? Are you say just spray grease all along my auger? Im still kind of confussed here.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes