Echo EVL550

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  #1  
Old 12-06-13, 07:44 PM
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Echo EVL550 chainsaw

Been sitting a few years. Spark and spark plug are good, shot ether into plug hole nothing, poured gas into carb nothing. I would appreciate any info. Bruce
 

Last edited by BruceDeuce; 12-06-13 at 09:40 PM.
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  #2  
Old 12-07-13, 03:40 PM
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Don't dump or spray anything else into it, just yet. Is the spark plug new or just jumping a spark? The plug/module could still be the problem - working outside the combustion chamber, but not inside the compressed air environment.

To get a complete picture of what you have, you would need a compression check. Often, on a two stroke that is a problem. But you may still get it started without checking it.

First leave the plug out, then full throttle, no choke, spin it over about fifteen pulls or so. Then put about a teaspoon of gas/oil mix down the plug hole, new spark plug and with full throttle, no choke see if it will fire. You may get a sign of starting. If it fires and tries to start, that's good.

Then make sure the filter in the tank if clean, if you have one there. Then put gas/oil in the tank, half throttle, half choke try to start it. It will take a few pulls.

BTW Echo is good saw.
 
  #3  
Old 12-07-13, 06:49 PM
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Thank you for your response! I will do as you suggest tomorrow and report back thanks
 
  #4  
Old 12-08-13, 04:42 PM
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Marbob

I did what you suggested and nothing. Not even a sputter
 
  #5  
Old 12-08-13, 07:36 PM
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It could be a couple of things and with the sitting of the saw and not knowing its recent history of having ran or not leaves the door open.

It could just be flooded and everything else is OK = a possibility. You have to get all the gas out of it and purge the engine with the plug out, the carb with no fuel, the tank dry, and the throttle and choke fully open. Then just pull on it to clear it out. A flooded condition can be really contrary to get cleared out.

Then you hand feed a small amount of gas/oil down the plug hole, put the plug back in and see if it will fire.

It can be everything is OK except the compression, typically from cylinder/piston/ring scoring. That can happen from poor fuel/oil mix, overheating, or a bad fuel air mixture setting which gives you poor lubrication. A lot of times that scoring is visible through the exhaust port that you can see through with the muffler pulled off. When you run the piston up past the port the scoring is visible on the piston and in the cylinder with the piston out of the way. Confirming the problem is done with a compression tester, looking for around 100 to 130 lbs of compression to get a running engine.

Lastly is the ignition module and spark plug being able to fire in the compression of the cylinder. A spark outside the cylinder should be a bright blue. An orange spark is considered too weak to run with.

IS this a saw you bought or you've had and just haven't used it for a while?
 
  #6  
Old 12-09-13, 05:50 AM
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It was recently given to me. It ran before he put it away after buying a bigger saw. I will purge it again and put gas/oil down the hole. Thanks again
 
  #7  
Old 12-09-13, 09:07 AM
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If it was running OK on when he shut it off, the likely hood is there is fuel residue in the combustion chamber and crankcase that will need to be cleared out with all the gas out of the saw. Then hand feed a small amount down the plug hole and pull on it until it fires.

Make sure you use a gas/oil mix for a primer and put it down the plug hole and not through the carburetor. Putting it through the latter means the crankcase has to be taken into consideration and that complicates it.
 
  #8  
Old 12-10-13, 09:28 AM
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I did it and absolutly nothing. I would think with having fuel and spark i would atleast get a backfire anything. Im going to pull the muffler off and see what it looks like inside. Anything else?
 
  #9  
Old 12-10-13, 03:38 PM
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Alas I did a compression test and couldnt get it above 80PSI
 
  #10  
Old 12-10-13, 04:03 PM
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I'm afraid that's the problem. That a good little saw, but it doesn't have enough compression to start it. The place ;the compression is lost may be worth fixing.

If the crank seals are leaking or if the rings on the piston are worn, or the muffler may be plugged or something on the intake end. All of those should be looked at as a possibility.

The "shot beyond" would be a cylinder/piston scoring. That can be repaired, with parts, but sometimes the expense is beyond the worth of the saw. It involves essentially a complete overhaul. If it was done to take care of the compression, you would still have the carburetor and potential ignition problems that could throw more expense in it. That's why a lot of people throw it away and buy a new one.

What you might do, since you have the tester at hand is put a little motor oil down the plug hole, give a couple of minutes to settle around the rings and retest the compression. That would narrow down where the compression loss is.
 

Last edited by marbobj; 12-10-13 at 04:29 PM.
  #11  
Old 12-11-13, 08:42 AM
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Thank you I will try that!
 
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