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lawnmower


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03-12-01, 11:15 AM   #1  
I am trying to replace the pull cord on a 5hp briggs& stratton walk behind mower. How do you adjust the line to get it to pull out and return to start the engine?

 
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03-12-01, 07:35 PM   #2  
Hi: M.A.Geisel

Hello and welcome to the Do It Yourself Web Site and my Small Engine forum.

If the rope is already broken, it will have to be totally replaced. You mentioned getting the rope adjusted, which leads me to believe you have a new rope and only need to get it wound up back into the pulley.

You will have to wind the pulley against the spring tension first, then hold the pulley in place. I suggest holding it in place with the light grip of a vise-grip. {You'll have to lineup the two holes of both the pulley and that in the housings case.}

Then feed in the rope thru the housing cover hole and then into the pulleys hole and tie a small knot. Be sure the knot is recessed into the pulleys hole so it doesn't drag on flywheel.

Hold the pulley firmly and do not allow it to move and carefully release the vise-grip. Now allow the rope to slowly be drawn into the housing and onto the pulley.

Now slip the pull handle onto the rope but do not knot it yet. Pull the rope out a ways so there will be a slight tension on it. Slide the rope handle down to that point and knot the rope. Be sure to wrap and knot the rope around the steel roll pin in the handle.

Use caution. Dealing with a spring under tension could be dangerous. Do not remove the spring nor remove any screw that holds the spring or pulley in place.


Regards and Good Luck.
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03-12-01, 07:39 PM   #3  
Hi: M.A.Geisel

Hello and welcome to the Do It Yourself Web Site and my Small Engine forum.

If the rope is already broken, it will have to be totally replaced. You mentioned getting the rope adjusted, which leads me to believe you have a new rope and only need to get it wound up back into the pulley.

You will have to wind the pulley against the spring tension first, then hold the pulley in place. I suggest holding it in place with the light grip of a vise-grip. {You'll have to lineup the two holes of both the pulley and that in the housings case.}

Then feed in the rope thru the housing cover hole and then into the pulleys hole and tie a small knot. Be sure the knot is recessed into the pulleys hole so it doesn't drag on flywheel.

Hold the pulley firmly and do not allow it to move and carefully release the vise-grip. Now allow the rope to slowly be drawn into the housing and onto the pulley.

Now slip the pull handle onto the rope but do not knot it yet. Pull the rope out a ways so there will be a slight tension on it. Slide the rope handle down to that point and knot the rope. Be sure to wrap and knot the rope around the steel roll pin in the handle.

Use caution. Dealing with a spring under tension could be dangerous. Do not remove the spring nor remove any screw that holds the spring or pulley in place.

If any of this sounds difficult and confusing, not to worry. However, there is some tricks of the trade that make it a simply task.

Best bet is to take the assembly to the local mower shop and have them do it. It's not an expensive repair.


Regards and Good Luck.
Web Site Admin, Moderator Hiring Agent, Host and Forums Manager. Energy Conservation Consultant & Natural Gas Appliance Diagnostics and Repair Technician. Fast, Fair, Friendly and Highly Proficient...

Don't Take Freedom For Granted. Thank A Veteran. Need an Employee? Hire a Veteran

Not only is a mind a terrible thing to waste, it's like a parachute.

It doesn't function until it's OPEN.........

Elvis. "The Sun Never Sets On A Legend."

Gun safety is using BOTH hands!

Driving Safety Reminder:
Buckle Up & Drive Safely.
"The Life You Save, May Be Your Own."

 
Sharp Advice's Avatar
Admin Emeritus

Join Date: Feb 1998
Posts: 10,440
CAL

03-12-01, 07:40 PM   #4  
Hi: M.A.Geisel

Hello and welcome to the Do It Yourself Web Site and my Small Engine forum.

If the rope is already broken, it will have to be totally replaced. You mentioned getting the rope adjusted, which leads me to believe you have a new rope and only need to get it wound up back into the pulley.

You will have to wind the pulley against the spring tension first, then hold the pulley in place. I suggest holding it in place with the light grip of a vise-grip. {You'll have to lineup the two holes of both the pulley and that in the housings case.}

Then feed in the rope thru the housing cover hole and then into the pulleys hole and tie a small knot. Be sure the knot is recessed into the pulleys hole so it doesn't drag on flywheel.

Hold the pulley firmly and do not allow it to move and carefully release the vise-grip. Now allow the rope to slowly be drawn into the housing and onto the pulley.

Now slip the pull handle onto the rope but do not knot it yet. Pull the rope out a ways so there will be a slight tension on it. Slide the rope handle down to that point and knot the rope. Be sure to wrap and knot the rope around the steel roll pin in the handle.

Use caution. Dealing with a spring under tension could be dangerous. Do not remove the spring nor remove any screw that holds the spring or pulley in place.

If any of this sounds difficult and confusing, not to worry. However, there is some tricks of the trade that make it a simply task.

Best bet is to take the starter assembly to the local mower shop and have them do it. It's not an expensive repair.


Regards and Good Luck.
Web Site Admin, Moderator Hiring Agent, Host and Forums Manager. Energy Conservation Consultant & Natural Gas Appliance Diagnostics and Repair Technician. Fast, Fair, Friendly and Highly Proficient...

Don't Take Freedom For Granted. Thank A Veteran. Need an Employee? Hire a Veteran

Not only is a mind a terrible thing to waste, it's like a parachute.

It doesn't function until it's OPEN.........

Elvis. "The Sun Never Sets On A Legend."

Gun safety is using BOTH hands!

Driving Safety Reminder:
Buckle Up & Drive Safely.
"The Life You Save, May Be Your Own."

 
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03-12-01, 07:56 PM   #5  
mikejmerritt
Tom, I suppose he got that times three. Must be a DIY software glitch. I have seen stranger around here...Mike

 
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03-13-01, 03:25 PM   #6  
lawnmower

Thanks I knew it was simple but the brain just did'nt kick in.

 
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