Rough Honda GX200

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  #1  
Old 07-09-14, 02:17 PM
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Rough Honda GX200

I purchased a go-cart, and it came with a Honda GX200 Type: QX2. The engine does not run. I have tested compression, and I did it by wrapping a line around the starter cup, and pulling, and I got about 90 P.S.I with two good tries. The carb seems a bit rough and it is missing all the springs and governors and linkages. The recoil starter is gone. The flywheel is too close to the magneto, so if someone can give me the gap, I would really appreciate it. Also, it is missing the breather, muffler cover, and they had a plastic storage container zip tied to the go cart in place for the OEM one. I put my new 5 HP Briggs on it for the time, I just thought I could try to raise this engine from the dead.

What I am asking for:
A point in any direction to setting up linkages when I buy them.
Magneto Gap.
Look at the photo of the carb and tell me what you think.
I will post the photo of the carb in a bit.

-Thanks in advance.
 
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  #2  
Old 07-09-14, 02:53 PM
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Here go some photos. The only differences and to when I bought it, and these photos are the crappy gas tank, and the flywheel shroud is off. There are some photos of the carb and the side of the engine too. Never seen an engine with plastic fins.

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  #3  
Old 07-09-14, 03:58 PM
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Is this a fun cart for kids in the back yard or are you setting up a racing kart?
 
  #4  
Old 07-09-14, 04:58 PM
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It's just for fun around the house. Any ideas on the gaps and linkage setup?
 
  #5  
Old 07-10-14, 05:52 AM
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For the gap I usually use a business card.

The linkages to the carburetor & governor is a whole different matter. Unfortunately it's a pretty specialized thing with many variations between engines and configurations. I'd just search the web for pictures of that engine and see what is done. You may be able to search parts retailers until you find a parts diagram that looks similar to your's and order the brackets, springs and linkages.

If you want to make something on your own keep in mind how the system works. The governor works to close the throttle while your throttle works to open it. The faster the engine turns the harder the governor pulls to close the throttle. Often the throttle and governor are connected to an intermediate lever by springs which then has a linkage to the throttle arm on the carburetor. You don't want rigid (no springs) connections otherwise the governor cannot do it's job.

When doing a throttle setup you want to have a spring to return the engine to idle should the throttle cable or linkage break. You don't want the engine running away at full throttle causing you to crash. It's also a good idea to have an engine kill switch within easy reach. Off topic but aircraft are rigged opposite so if the throttle cable is broken the engine goes to full throttle.
 
  #6  
Old 07-10-14, 09:29 PM
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Okay, so today I went further with the carb. I took it apart and removed the large bowl where the float is housed, then the smaller bowl. I am not sure what the smaller one is for...maybe main fuel source or overflow? Anyways, I blew on the small pipe that goes at a 90* bend and it was stopped up. Removed the cover for the bowl, still stopped up. Then I poured out what little gas was in it, and it unclogged, though I am not sure if it was gas, or varnish, or actual debris. I put the carb and all the parts excluding the float, float pin, and a few gaskets in my carb cleaning bucket overnight.

I guess this thread could just be a chronicling of the rebuild of the engine. I'll go one more time tommorow to check compression on her. If she gives me 90+, I'll go ahead. First thing is the recoil housing. Can't test start for spark as easily without it. Next will be the gas tank, which seems like it uses gravity to feed, which I am not familiar with. I'll upload some photos of the carb dissection in this post.



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  #7  
Old 07-13-14, 03:48 PM
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Well, I have hit a snag. it seems that there is something behind the flywheel that it is rubbing on during revolutions, and it is stopping it from completely making them smoothly, I can turn it easily by hand until it stops, then I have to force it past. I have tried a breaker bar, a ratchet, and an airchuck set to 150 P.S.I. to try and remove the flywheel nut, but it is not budging. There are no places on the internet where it talks about how to remove them, this one will not move at all. Any ideas?
 
  #8  
Old 07-13-14, 04:23 PM
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Are you asking about removing the nut or the flywheel?
 
  #9  
Old 07-13-14, 10:33 PM
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I was asking about the nut, but I actually went out to the shed, and tried a new approach, I got a breaker bar, with the socket, braced the flywheel, then instead of just pushing down with my body weight, (I'm a bigger fellow, 6'1, 220 Lbs.) and having the breaker bar BREAK IN HALF, I kind of pushed my foot down on it sort of like an impact wrench (I learned this at BMW STEP when the air compressor wasn't working...LOL) and it came off! But I am having trouble getting the flywheel off, I'm going to see if harbor freight has a tool for it tommrow. The reason I am taking it off is because it seems like every three revolutions, the flywheel is rubbing against something, causing it not to turn it by the force of my hand (if I back up past it's stopping point and thrust it, it goes) so I want to see what is causing that. Hopefully it's not internal. Any ideas what it could be?

-Thanks.
 
  #10  
Old 07-14-14, 06:25 AM
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When you turn the flywheel do you see it wobble? One common problem is when trying to remove a difficult nut or when prying unevenly to pull the flywheel the crank can be bent. In that case the engine could be made into a small boat anchor with a good piece of rope.

Excessive in/out freeplay of the crank is not good but it should be uniform. Are you feeling more during one part of the rotation or is it uniform with the flywheel in different positions?
 
  #11  
Old 07-14-14, 10:49 AM
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No, no wobbling, though when I look at the gap between the magneto and the flywheel side, it looks like the flywheel gets larger (the gap gets smaller, but not too small, just to the point where you can notice a difference). I still cannot get it off. I will see if I can go to harbor freight and rent (in florida this means Return After Use...LOL) and try to pull off the flywheel. But I am still wondering as to what could be behind it making that noise, and not making the revoltions smooth. time will tell.

-Thanks Pilot!
 
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