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Troybilt tiller


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07-21-14, 03:53 PM   #1  
Troybilt tiller

Hi all, I also have a 12097 tiller, it has never run right since new,I have rebuilt the carb,same issue, will fire and run 30 sec's and stop,there is a spring on top of the throttle shaft that appears to be a compression type spring and does nothing to control the throttle,what controls the throttle plate?
Geo

 
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07-21-14, 04:32 PM   #2  
Depends on the carburetor and engine alittle. A common setup is a rod coming from the governor that controls the throttle plate. That rod would pull against a spring. The hand control for the machine would move the linkage from the governor. IF you would post either an engine model and number or a pic of the carb we could be more exact.

Does the engine rev up right before it dies?

 
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07-22-14, 02:58 PM   #3  
The engine model is TC300 3152F Tecumseh , The carb is a Tillitson HU 112E8. The engine does not rev patio to stalling.
Geo

 
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07-22-14, 06:24 PM   #4  
In looking at the diagram of that little jewel I would say the rpms of the engine are predetermined, which is to say the operator doesn't have a say in it. The air vane you see or have in yours is a typical governor component that regulates the rpms , which for all practical purposes are preset. The throttle plate just isn't controlled by anything the operator can affect as the tilling is done although it does have a speed adjustment linkage for setup.

That spring you're talking about is likely to provide a pressure against the vane so you don't have a fluttering throttle plate.

The engineering take on all this would likely be; tilling is be best done at a specific engine rpm to handle the constant torque/hp demands of the job and once that is done mechanically, the operator isn't ask for his/her opinion- if they can just steer it and decide which ones are the weeds, it'll work.

To take it past your tiller into a higher level of equipment, alot of construction dozers/backhoes/etc. run the engine at a preset rpm with wide open throttle and the hydrostatic drives are the speed control of the equipment.

 
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07-22-14, 06:58 PM   #5  
As far as it dieing shortly after startup. I suspect it's as simple as an imbalance in the fuel air mixture which really needs to make a transition from rich/starting to leaner/running. Without a manual throttle you can't help it make that transition. A precise adjustment may, but with variables like humidity and air temp it wouldn't be that reliable.

Marketing people sing one song: easier and better for ya. That becomes the cutting edge to sell in a competitive market where you have a lot of talented engineering people. So they try to put everything into one package that does everything. Somewhere in that troupe are a couple of practical people who say "it's not that easy and isn't even necessary". But it's done to show to the user how convenient it is and make the sale. If you look at other models from different companies you see a primer, a choke, a hand throttle and people who use them get along fine.

Yours looks like a do it all with hardware with a two stroke engine and a hands off fuel system. It just isn't that easy in that price range.

 
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07-23-14, 04:50 AM   #6  
Thanks for taking the time to explain some of the machines operation,engineers should be required to work with everything they design.
Geo

 
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07-23-14, 06:27 AM   #7  
Yeah. They should be changing some of the spark plugs they engineer in the newer vans.

 
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07-23-14, 09:07 AM   #8  
Here is a link to the manual for your engine in case you don't have one. Have a good one. Geo
http://th.manualwebsite.com/pdf/tc_series_2-cycle.pdf

 
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07-24-14, 07:57 AM   #9  
I have had this carb apart and cleaned,all back together now and I can not get the primer to work I sucked gas into the carb and now when I use the primer bulb it appears to be air bubbles in the line.
Help!
Geo

 
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07-25-14, 01:31 PM   #10  
When you "sucked gas into the carb" what did you do there? Isn't the primer a two line job with one line going to the carburetor and the other going to the tank?

IF this is the setup, then the line from tank must not be tight or the check valve in the primer is bad. That would keep air from coming back into it as it pumps.

That is a primer on an all position carb that puts gas into the carb throat. A lot of them just move gas through the carb chamber to clear out the air. Since that one doesn't have a choke it has to inject fuel directly into the carb throat.

That's sort of what a choke does with the choke circuit/choke plate = deliver a richer starting mixture of gas/air.

 
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07-26-14, 05:26 PM   #11  
This primer has one line to the carb.so I removed the line at the primer bulb and sucked gas through the carb, not sure what that proved.
Geo


Last edited by Geochurchi; 07-26-14 at 06:02 PM.
 
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07-26-14, 06:26 PM   #12  
I think the primer bulb pumps air into the carb to force fuel up the nozzle, if you look through the carb throat as you pump the primer, fuel should be seen coming out of the nozzle. Have a good one. Geo

 
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07-27-14, 04:42 AM   #13  
Not this one,that's what I am trying to figure why not.

 
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07-27-14, 08:47 AM   #14  
The carbs and fuel system is covered starting on pg. 6 of the manual I posted earlier. Have a good one. Geo

 
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07-28-14, 07:42 AM   #15  
I'm not sure how that particular one works - whether it pumps air to drive fuel or draws fuel to pump fuel. The bottom line is it has to drive fuel into the carb throat. The way the description of the primer reads it may have a port on the primer to allow air to enter the bulb and then, as Geo has figured out, uses that air to force fuel from the carb for starting. With that setup you would only have a limited amount of fuel to work with for priming.

But, that being the case you would only have air in the line, no fuel. You might take a look at the base of the primer to see if there is a port for the air to enter. My take on it would be - to drive unfiltered air into the carburetor on a dusty tiller = a little iffy.

There's just a number of different primers that do the job a little differently. Some move fuel into the carb throat and others just circulate fuel through the carb.

 
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07-28-14, 04:43 PM   #16  
I am pretty sure it is supposed to pump air in,what I can't figure out is what that air is supposed to do,is it supposed to force the control needle up by lifting the diaphragm up? Some info I have read seems to point to some sort check valve under the main jet to prevent fuel from flowing back into the primer bulb, it's hard to find exactly what is doing what.
Geo

 
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