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Old yardman snowbird snowblower start help please


Bjjbadboy's Avatar
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01-25-15, 07:19 PM   #1  
Old yardman snowbird snowblower start help please

Hey guys so I have an old prob early to mid 80s.

I know the carb was rebuilt years ago and it has been started a few years ago. Probably 5ish by a mechanic friend of the family. I am very mechanically inclined however I've never been able to start this thing. So now that it's been years and I know it does work I would like to get it going. It deff hasn't been stored correctly but I think it was run dry or left with very little gas in it. I know he had a trick to starting It pretty sure he used starter fluid.

It is very hard to pull the cord to start it so I'm not sure if I'm even getting a spark to the ignition. (I don't remember it being so hard to pull) so if the fly wheel magnets aren't making the spark that would be my first issue, correct? How can I check if I'm getting a spark? I read there is a way? Could the flywheel(that's what the cord is attached to correct? Just be dirty from sitting in my shop? Can I remove a cover or something and jus hit it with compressed air?

I have carb cleaner but isn't this added and then the engine is run and it cleans? It case there was gas left and it got gummed up.

I have starter fluid for small engines, do you pull the spark plug and spray a few shots into the cylinder? Or do you spray it on the tip of the spark plug that the wire is connected to?

Is there a proper way to prime it? I'm guessing some gas is going to need to be primed since it's not fuel injected like a car? I know on my lawn mower you push a rubber button 3xs and on the weed wacked you can see the gas getting pumped into the line.

Is there a special way to set the choke for a difficult old blower?

Thanks in advance guys

 
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01-25-15, 09:56 PM   #2  
To check for spark, I remove the plug & lay it on it's side, on a steel unpainted part of the engine. Then I pull the cord & look for spark. The spark should be orange with a blue tint. Since it may have been flooded, I would squirt a few drops of oil or transmission fluid in the cylinder & pull the cord a few times. Then install a new plug. Have a few of them available. Set the choke to the on/closed position. As soon as it starts, slowly open it. You may not need started fluid.

 
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01-25-15, 10:30 PM   #3  
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Thanks for the reply. Where would I get a new spark plug will an auto store have it? And what kind of oil do I drop in the cylinder? I have oil for my air compressor and for my car no tranny oil. If that doesn't work should I try the starter fluid? Also oil looked low and super black so I'm going to change that.

It's actual a 1967 model.. 7010-0 thing is a tank but I know it worked pretty recently as in the last 10 yrs

 
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01-26-15, 04:45 AM   #4  
Sometimes an auto store will have the plug, sometimes a hardware store. Any oil will do to get the compression back in a gas washer cylinder (flooded). Starter fluid will not. If you flood the cylinder again, you will probably have to change the oil again. Any time you smell gas in the oil, it must be changed.

 
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01-26-15, 04:45 AM   #5  
You'll have to check for spark first. Try checking in a dark garage so the spark will be easier to see. If no spark you'll have to check the points/condenser on that age of engine. If you have a problem finding or need specs on them, post the model of the engine and its serial number and the forum guys here can send you in the right direction to get it running.

 
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01-26-15, 04:57 AM   #6  
If it has not been run for five years and was not properly prepared for long term storage I think you have bigger problems than a spark plug. Of all the things on the engine the ignition system can best tolerate sitting without care. Everyone loves to put in a new spark plug (after all it's easy) but they are extremely reliable and rarely die when just sitting.

I think the fuel system should be your task. Drain the fuel tank and add a little fresh gas and see if you can start it. It's a long shot but worth a try. Without knowing anything I'd bet the carburetor will need to be removed, disassembled and given a through cleaning. While at it this would be a good time to replace the fuel line.

In general starting fluid should not be used. It's extremely volatile and if used improperly you can damage the engine. It's often used to coax an engine to life instead of doing the basic maintenance to make the engine run properly.

 
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01-26-15, 08:24 AM   #7  
Thanks for the reply guys. Going to pick up some gas and give it a try. I read about mixing this sea foam stuff with the gas and it will clean the carb as long as it's not terrible. I'll do a full overhaul on it after this blizzard.

Just some other questions. Before I start. In the past it was very hard to pull the cord. Do you advise putting a few drops of oil in the spark plug cylinder then pulling the cord? I also read which makes sense to remove the plug add a little gas if it starts then stops the issue is either the fuel line or the carb. I don't have access to a new fuel line. If it's clogged how can I unclog it? I've got a pretty good IDea what to clean on the carb and don't think I'll have a problem but should I try the carb fuel cleaner that you add to the tank first?
Thanks again

 
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01-26-15, 08:51 AM   #8  
Do you advise putting a few drops of oil in the spark plug cylinder then pulling the cord?
Yes, that's what I said before.

I also read which makes sense to remove the plug add a little gas if it starts then stops the issue is either the fuel line or the carb.
No, that could flood it again.

I don't have access to a new fuel line. If it's clogged how can I unclog it?
Remove it & blow air through it.

I've got a pretty good IDea what to clean on the carb and don't think I'll have a problem but should I try the carb fuel cleaner that you add to the tank first?
You can spray some cleaner in the carb. Don't add it to the tank.

 
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01-26-15, 11:32 AM   #9  
Thanks again for the help. I added some oil to the cylinder. The spark plug looks pretty bad but there was a spark. I added gas and had no luck. I didn't read this yet so I added a few drops to the cylinder and it puffed out smoke and wanted to start so I'm thinking if I get the carb cleaned up it may start. The only carborator cleaner I have is the one that you add to the tank I read about this sea foam stuff but if the gas can't get into the carb it's not going to help.

Should I try and pull the carb off and clean it up

 
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01-26-15, 12:00 PM   #10  
Can you post the model numbers on the engine, so we know what carburetor you have?

You can pick up spray carb cleaner. Before you take the carburetor off pick up a rebuild kit at your local outdoor equipment dealer. It'll have new gaskets and other parts that you'll need to rebuild it.

Pick up a new plug too. Even Walmart carries them.

 
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01-26-15, 01:30 PM   #11  
No, don't remove the carb. You aren't that far yet.

 
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01-26-15, 02:04 PM   #12  
Take LOTS of pictures of the carburetor setup too. So you can put the linkages back correctly.

 
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01-26-15, 02:40 PM   #13  
So... Yeah I should check on here first but I figure I built my car engine for the most part what's a snowblower. Took off the fuel cleaned it with gas and some carb cleaner swished around and repeated with just has until only clear gas came out. Cleaned the port that the fuel line is on. Took the fuel line off blew air through it. Figured out how to take the carb off was really simple (why are there different holes that the linkage can connect) any way took the bell off everything was pretty clean. Thinking it was rebuilt while my grandfather was still around but he didn't get to use it much...(kinda the reason I wanted it to start up, I'm sentimental about my tools and toys. He would have fixed not bought a new one)

Put everything back together, fresh gas. 2 pulls she started up. The idle is very rough and it's shaken the choke which is then closing it and it would kick off. I started it a few time. Had the choke in place long enough to even through it in drive and hit the snow. It threw the snow but not nearly like it used to and forward and reverse where quick as hell.

It's also running hot or what I think seems hot should the top of the moter and exhaust get hot in a matter of maybe 2 mins it was running?

Who knows when the last time the oil was changed on this but it's low and very dark. I saw a full thing of 5w30.. It was empty opps and I know supposed to use 0w30 right or 5w20? Can the rough idle be bc it's low in oil? Or just needs an oil change?

What else do you think I can look at?
I'll try to look for the serial number. All I can see is it's yard man snow bird 24" self propelled model 7010-0

I have some used auto oil... Synthetic 5w20 with 3k driving on it (I baby my car) would it be terrible to throw that in until this storm is over?

Or stick to the elbow grease for this storm and play with my blower for the next. It was also suppppper loud you would think there was a 67 mustang coming down the block not a 67 snowbird :-)

Thank you all for your help and advice, helping me to get a little piece of history and sentiment to work again. Some of my best memories were when that snowblower would be plowing the block

 
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01-26-15, 03:52 PM   #14  
For that year it will likely call for a heavier oil like 10w30. The 0W/20 stuff is more new gen by comparison.

 
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01-26-15, 03:59 PM   #15  
5w-30 or 10w-30 would be more like it.

 
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