Honda generator won't start

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  #1  
Old 02-15-15, 01:45 PM
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Honda generator won't start

I'd love to know if all that worked, 'cause I've got the identical problem. The unit has been sitting idle for a few years, so I'm very suspicious of the carburetor's health. I'd take it to the local small-engine shop if it weren't so darn heavy, but it looks like a thorough cleaning will help.



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Last edited by PJmax; 02-15-15 at 01:55 PM. Reason: started new thread
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Old 02-15-15, 02:02 PM
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We leave the old threads viewable for research. You read the old thread and try the information. If it doesn't work you start a new thread.

I have four of the Honda EM5000SX's. Two are electric start.

If you left gas in the carburetor for years then the carb must be removed and cleaned. If you can't bring the machine to the service center then bring them the carb. The carb and speed control system is very delicate so if you do remove it yourself be very careful.

You cannot leave the gas in any device. The gas dries and the remaining gum and varnish clogs all the ports. When you are finished with the genny you turn the gas valve off and let it run until it's out of gas.
 
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Old 02-15-15, 02:47 PM
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I agree with PJmax. A machine sitting without use is bad and the only thing worse is to leave gasoline in it while it sits. There is no better way to gum up a carburetor.

Don't think a can of spray carburetor cleaner hosed on the outside or down the throat will help. It really needs to be removed, disassembled and possibly soaked to remove varnish deposits.

You've got a very good generator so it is well worth your effort or money to get it working again. Then, once it's running read up and religiously follow a long tern storage procedure. Gas goes bad and if you let it set with gas in it it will happen again. It's not the generator's fault. It's the fuel. If you don't want to go through a long term storage procedure I would look into converting it to run on propane or natural gas which does not have a storage problem like gasoline.
 

Last edited by Tolyn Ironhand; 02-16-15 at 12:26 PM. Reason: fixed typo
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Old 02-15-15, 04:08 PM
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99% of the time it's a fuel issue.
Using nonethanol fuel. Adding a stabilizer, shutting off the fuel and letting it run out before shutting off will make a huge difference.
Anything gas powered needs to have all the old gas drained and new nonethanol fuel added.
Useless trying to use old fuel.
Been using ethanol fuel the fuel lines will hard as a rock, carburetor gummed up, float stuck.
 
  #5  
Old 02-15-15, 05:47 PM
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Long-term storage is an art. I worked on old round aircraft engines in my past, and we used various pickling mixtures to preserve them. I haven't found anything that will work reliably, on a small engine yet, and even had problems running out the fuel altogether. You're right, propane is a good answer; my whole-house generator runs on propane, but it's wicked expensive where I live.

Thanks...
 
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Old 02-15-15, 05:53 PM
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I rent out generators as part of my business and they need to be ready at all times. I've found Seafoam additive works better than Stabile. My generators are all Hondas. You turn the gas on and they start on the second pull. I've never had to clean a carb yet. That 5000 is a beautiful unit. It will last a long time if taken care of.
 
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Old 02-16-15, 07:32 AM
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Radials don't leak oil... they just mark their territory.

Even running an engine out of gas isn't 100% foolproof. Small amounts remain in the passages and jets of the carb and can still gum up and cause trouble. One of the best methods I've found is to run 100LL Avgas in small engines. If it's something I'm not going to use for a while I'll drain out the gasoline and put a bit of Avgas in the tank. Then run the engine until it dies. The Avgas flushes out the auto gas from the tiny passages in the carburetor and what little bit of Avgas remains does not varnish like auto fuel.

As a test I've got a jug of 8 year old Avgas at home. Once a year when I'm bored I'll give it a smell and look. It still smells and looks good and when I throw a bit in a machine they've always started. I'm beginning to think 100LL never goes bad.
 
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Old 02-16-15, 12:21 PM
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Why didn't I think of that?

Great idea. I'm embarrassed I didn't think of that. And a few ounces at a time are free . I did think of alcohol of some kind, but weighing its hygroscopic benefits against its unknown effects on gaskets and seals I discarded that idea.
 
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