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Honda GCV160 Carb Leaking Gas


jl66redcpe's Avatar
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Join Date: Nov 2006
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NJ

04-26-15, 04:40 AM   #1  
Honda GCV160 Carb Leaking Gas

I have a Craftsman mower with a GCV160 Honda engine that is driving me nuts. Mower model 917-378501 Honda GCV160-AS3A. The carb is leaking gas. I have disassembled and cleaned the carb, washed out the gas tank, put a new fuel hose from shutoff valve to carb, all the gaskets are in correctly. Everything tests fine for a couple days. I return it to the customer it does ok for one cutting and then the carb starts leaking again. I realize the customer could be putting in debris from a bad can etc. It is obviously a needle seat problem of some kind. I need some suggestions on how to remedy this problem -- maybe a filter of some kind -- anything. Are these Honda carbs prone to leaking ??? I don't tend to see the problem with Honda engines on Honda mowers.

 
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Pilot Dane's Avatar
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04-26-15, 05:15 AM   #2  
Are you finding any sediment in the fuel tank or carb bowl when the customer brings the mower back? You mentioned disassembling and cleaning. Did you replace the needle? WOW! I just checked Sears Parts and the needle is $22 and the whole carburetor is $17.

I put a filter in the fuel line immediately in front of the carb of all my push mowers. They're so cheap it's almost a no brainer if there is room.

 
jl66redcpe's Avatar
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04-26-15, 05:41 AM   #3  
Yes, that is the problem --- there is not a lot of room on this engine. What kind of a filter ??

 
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04-26-15, 10:49 AM   #4  
I just use cheap, plastic inline filters. I like the slightly larger ones that allow me to see inside to the pleated, cone shaped filter but shorter ones are available. I just like being able to see inside for some idea of how dirty it may be getting. Honestly though I've never replaced one. They pick up a speck now and then but I figure it's cheap insurance.



I got started with the habit of installing a filter long ago when I inherited a snow blower from my deceased grandfather. A really nice machine but by the time it got to me the fuel had formed a hard varnish inside the tank and fuel lines. After having to take the carb apart the third time I knew bits had to be breaking free and re-clogging the carb so instead of taking the time to remove and clean the tank and replace the fuel line I stuck in a filter right before the carb. It worked well until I got bored one weekend and pulled the tank and got rid of the varnish.

 
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