Mounting New Tire

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  #41  
Old 05-18-15, 08:49 PM
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I remember using some type of glue on those hard to seal beads. It might have been gasket cement. It was 45 or more years ago so it's a little vague. You know what they say. If you remember the 60s, you really weren't there.
 
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  #42  
Old 05-19-15, 04:05 AM
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lI suppose that since the exact location of the bead leak is known, a little dab of Elmer's Glue would seal that puppy . . . . or for the PETA members among us, a little squeeze of rubber cement will do the trick. It's probably just a couple grains of sand that got caught in the bead or caused a stubborn little scratch.

I used to have a bead that would break whenever I tried to squeeze my mower between two cedar trees that kept growing closer and closer together over time, narrowing the passage . . . . now I just go around them.

Hey, if that innocent tire is going to the dump . . . . I'll take it !
 
  #43  
Old 05-19-15, 05:19 AM
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I vote yes for Elmer's Glue & no for rubber cement. It's not really for rubber. Elmer's Glue might cost $5. That would put the cost at $85, for the soon to be fixed, tire.
 
  #44  
Old 05-19-15, 08:15 AM
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Load the tire with a can of slime and let it fix itself. Have a good one. Geo
 
  #45  
Old 05-19-15, 10:35 AM
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That's $80 for the entire machine, not the tire.

I'd put a tube in it or fill it with sealant if it was my personal mower.
 
  #46  
Old 05-19-15, 11:51 AM
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Say Cheese

I know that it's for the entire machine. However, it all has to be calculated as part of the cost, for the soon to be fixed tire. If future tires are fixed with the same machine, then the cost of fixing the current tire can be recalculated. That's basic economics.
 
  #47  
Old 05-19-15, 12:53 PM
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You always have to include the cost of education ..... and providing you have room, nothing beats acquiring more tools
 
  #48  
Old 05-19-15, 12:58 PM
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No, $41 with tax and shipping and coupon for the machine, $29 I think for the tire and $13 for the tube.

I'm gonna put on a new tire and tube and be done with it, I hope.
 
  #49  
Old 05-19-15, 01:02 PM
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...nothing beats acquiring more tools.
Exactly! Little brother still thinks I'm nuts but that's the way it goes I guess.
 
  #50  
Old 05-19-15, 02:33 PM
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Tell little brother to join the forum so he can tell us how he really feels.
 
  #51  
Old 05-19-15, 04:20 PM
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Pulpo, with your sentence structure and punctuation, your post reads that it puts the cost at $85 for fixing the tire. I was making sure you understood that isn't the case.
 

Last edited by cheese; 05-19-15 at 04:37 PM.
  #52  
Old 05-19-15, 05:33 PM
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Again I am with cheese.
I still haven't seen it posted what mower this is on, and as I posted prior, it would be a good idea to make sure you can actually get the wheel OFF.
Should it happen to be an older MTD, that has a shaft with a flat on it..............

 
  #53  
Old 05-19-15, 06:38 PM
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I change those MTDs with the axles with flats on them with the wheel still mounted to the mower. It's aggravating, but those wheels sometimes just do NOT come off. I can heat them red hot and use an impact hammer and they still don't come off. Just a few days ago, I pulled the transmission out of one and to get the wheels off and I had to get the torch and cut them off the axles. Good thing I was junking the mower!
 
  #54  
Old 05-20-15, 01:06 AM
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I change those MTDs with the axles with flats on them with the wheel still mounted to the mower. It's aggravating, but those wheels sometimes just do NOT come off.
that was my point exactly cheese and I have done also but usually just install a tube in the old tire so only one side needs to come off the wheel. Or fill the thing with slime and call it a day...again if customer is ok with it or it is my personal mower.
But in doing so, a tire changing tool is of little use?
 
  #55  
Old 05-20-15, 07:04 AM
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MTD model 136B560B700 rear engine rider I bought new in 97.

It has an axle with a small bolt (9/16 socket) and the wheel came right off. First time it has been off I'm sure. Always stored inside so maybe no rust to make it difficult? Or I'm just lucky.

Thinking back decades when I fixed bicycle tires, is it a good idea to inflate the tube just enough to keep its shape before putting inside tire?

Thanks
 
  #56  
Old 05-20-15, 10:21 AM
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No, on a bike tube you can do that, but not a mower tube. You'll never get it on the rim if you put air in it.

Keeping the mower indoors is probably why the wheel came off. Every once in a while I run across one that comes off easily, but usually they are grown together as one piece.
 
  #57  
Old 05-20-15, 11:23 AM
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Ok, thanks........................
 
  #58  
Old 05-21-15, 08:14 PM
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Success !!!!!!

Machine arrived today and that thing is a dream, mostly I suppose from being able to bolt the whole thing down.

Removed tire with no trouble at all, mounted the new one, I didn't use the tube I bought.

Struggled getting the last bead on until I remembered to push the opposite side down to where the rim is smaller. That handle went around like going through butter...plop...DONE. Aired it up, happy as a clam. Don't forget soap!

I don't know if it is worth $40, less than $30 from a store with coupon, but it sure was easy after watching a few videos. Here is one of the better ones I found showing how easy it is:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKIgIXuziXg


Thanks everyone, sure appreciated the help. :
 
  #59  
Old 05-22-15, 03:06 AM
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Glad you got it fixed, wonder when little brother will come around wanting to use it
 
  #60  
Old 05-22-15, 09:18 AM
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I don't know if it is worth $40,...
In terms of the raw materials, not even close. That bar with the shaped end IS the key along with the solid mounting of the wheel. If a person had a substantial workbench AND could shape a bar with the proper end then making a tire changer is easy. Even just mounting a steel pipe with a plate on top in a large chunk of concrete buried in the yard and a properly sized through-bolt to attach the wheel would make changing a tire much easier. The major trick is to mount that tire/wheel securely so that you are not fighting it moving all around at the same time that you are fighting the bead.

I've thought about making a changer with about a 12 inch square piece of steel on the bottom of a vertical pipe and then setting concrete anchors in the floor of my garage. This would allow for me to bolt the pipe in place when I wanted/needed to change a tire and still remove the pipe when not needed. Since I change tires so seldom I doubt that I would ever follow through on the thought.
 
  #61  
Old 05-22-15, 11:32 AM
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That bar with the shaped end IS the key along with the solid mounting of the wheel.
Absolutely. If a person had a welder and maybe torch like you do you could make one rather easy I'd guess. I have neither so this worked for me. If you have a HF close by and a 20% off coupon from the internet it would be $32 + tax.

Here's a picture I took for my crabass brother. When done you can break it down in 5 minutes and store it away.



 
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