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Mounting New Tire


Baldwin's Avatar
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05-13-15, 12:29 PM   #1  
Mounting New Tire

Carlisle Turf Saver 16x6.50x8

Brother tells me it is a piece of cake, he can do it in about 10 minutes. He says just a couple screwdrivers is all I need, claims the bead is nothing like a car tire.

True? I just don't want to ruin my new tire.

Thanks

 
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05-13-15, 12:36 PM   #2  
Isn't someone available who has a machine? How much could it cost? If you still want to try it, make sure that you have some long screwdrivers.

 
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05-13-15, 12:36 PM   #3  
Screwdrivers or pry bars work and some I've just pushed on the sidewall with the end of a hammer handle and was able to get the bead to slip over the rim. It's not terribly difficult except that it's small and without the rim attached to anything it moves around as you try to pry so sometimes I lay it flat on the floor and stand on the tire which is enough to get it over the rim. Then I put a ratchet strap with no hooks around the perimeter of the tread to squeeze the tire and force the beads out to make seating & sealing easier.

 
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05-13-15, 12:40 PM   #4  
put a ratchet strap with no hooks around the perimeter of the tread to squeeze the tire and force the beads out to make seating & sealing easier.
That is pretty much a must! a rope or even an old belt will also work
As long as you use a little care you shouldn't need to worry about damaging the tire. If it has a tube you'd need to be more careful with it. IMO the smaller diameter tires are harder to mount


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05-13-15, 12:42 PM   #5  
If you have already succeeded in getting the old tire off . . . . you'll do fine.

A couple years ago, I couldn't break the bead on these lawnmower tires (that had been mounted for over a decade), and had to resort to driving my car onto a 2" X 6" carefully positioned to tear the rubber away from the wheel in a couple places . . . . it was a two person job.

 
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05-13-15, 12:59 PM   #6  
That size is still in the range of not too bad. The smaller ones are the toughest, and it's my opinion that it's because there simply isn't enough rubber to hold onto not to stretch. First side is easy. Once you flip it over and get the first quarter or so started on the second side, push the bead in toward the center of the wheel where it's smaller diameter. A little bit of liquid soap goes a long way toward making it easier to slip the rubber onto the rim, and, as mentioned, a rope, belt, or strap will make it easier to set the bead. Can't visualize the exact size right now, but, if practical in your case, I have found that a bolt the size of the axle in a vise, to hold the wheel in one place, works pretty well. If the hole is large enough, well, it gets real easy, as I have an old Coats 2020 in the shop. And I assume this is tubeless? If not, be darn careful with the screwdrivers.

 
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05-13-15, 01:04 PM   #7  
Actually, the tire is on the mower in the shed yet, I bought the new tire last fall. Seeing it's supposed to rain for a week I thought I'd give it a try.

Thanks guys, I'll let you know.

 
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05-13-15, 01:10 PM   #8  
Yes, it's tubeless.

As someones signature says, "what can happen." I remember watching people back in the old days trying to mount a car tire with tire irons and such and it didn't look like fun.

 
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05-13-15, 02:41 PM   #9  
Depending on what mower you have, you might want to make sure you can even get the wheel off.
I used to have a couple of irons that they use to change motorcycle tires with about 5 bux each.
I don't agree that this is an "easy" task, not complicated but if it is your first and only keep women and kids out of ear shot
Depending on how patient and how much you value your time, my suggestion would be just take it to a tire shop or small engine repair for a minimal charge and much avoided frustration.

If you do try to take it on yourself another tip is to bring the tire in a warm place or let it sit in the sun for a while to get good and warm so it is more pliable.

 
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05-13-15, 03:08 PM   #10  
Lots of good advice!
I use my hydraulic press to break the bead. I then bolt the wheel to my welding table (2 1/2" thick) and use large screwdrivers to pry off old tire.
Recently learned a new trick for getting the tire on wheel. Use a C-clamp to pinch sidewalls together after one side is on and about 1/2 of other side. Helps to hold bead in position for the final pry-over. Lube it with WD40 or dishwashing soap.

Any way you tackle it can be frustrating. To air it up and seat bead, try using a rubber tipped blowgun and have the valve core removed from tire. This lets more air in.

Makes me tired just thinking about it. Have done three already this season.

RR

 
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05-13-15, 03:31 PM   #11  
Makes me tired just thinking about it. Have done three already this season.

RR
Dawn dish soap and a small paint brush or spray bottle.

.

 
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05-13-15, 04:00 PM   #12  
I don't get it. What's wrong with taking it to a tire store? Why go through all that s---?

 
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05-13-15, 04:17 PM   #13  
Pulpo:
[QUOTEI don't get it. What's wrong with taking it to a tire store? Why go through all that s---? ][/QUOTE]

Tire store is ten miles away and is closed Saturday PM and all Sunday. If I can't fix the tires myself, then I don't get to mow. Weekend is when I do most of my mowing. (over 2 acres)

Not all of us are overflowing with $$.

RR

 
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05-13-15, 04:30 PM   #14  
To air it up and seat bead, try using a rubber tipped blowgun and have the valve core removed from tire.
Or you can try starter fluid. Mind the beard and/or eyebrows.


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05-13-15, 04:43 PM   #15  
By all means, if you & the OP or any others who own thousands of dollars worth of land, can't afford to pay someone to mount the tire, change it yourself. I have nothing against that. I would do the same. I happen to rent. So I don't care about grass. When we moved to the suburbs from Brooklyn, my father had me pulling weeds on a hot summer day. I hated it. Now I recommend that people replace their grass with pavers.

 
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05-13-15, 04:53 PM   #16  
Vermont:
A couple years ago, I couldn't break the bead on these lawnmower tires (that had been mounted for over a decade), and had to resort to driving my car onto a 2" X 6" carefully positioned to tear the rubber away from the wheel in a couple places . . . . it was a two person job.
baldwin:
As someones signature says, "what can happen." I remember watching people back in the old days trying to mount a car tire with tire irons and such and it didn't look like fun.
Oh...I remember those days when my Dad taught me how to break the bead from a car tire by riding over the edge of the tire with the car. He also had a set of special tire irons that made quick work out of sliding the bead off the wheel. Those were the days. Would never do it now.

 
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05-13-15, 06:08 PM   #17  
It's honestly not that much of a chore, and, in my opinion, should be on the list of things that guys know how to do anyway. Modern radial tires on vehicles? Nope, technology has passed DIY in this case, and it's too darn much work; my old tire changer even groans at some of them. But at least I know that I still could if I absolutely had to. Lawn mowers, two wheel carts, wheel barrows, yes, I think it's good experience to learn how to change them. In fact I drove down to a neighbor's Saturday, to help him change a tire on his mower. He picked it up, thought he could do it, and got hung up,but I know for sure that I had it done and a gin and tonic that he made me in hand before he could have gotten to the nearest shop that would have done it for him. And now he has a better idea of what to do next time. Only thing you have to watch is that in some cases, wheel barrows for example, for whatever reason, you can usually buy a mounted tire for less than a tire and/or inner tube would cost.

 
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05-13-15, 08:31 PM   #18  
"I don't get it. What's wrong with taking it to a tire store? Why go through all that s---?" -Pulpo

Because the name of this site is Doityourself.com. I can change a tire in about as much time as you can drive it from your house to the closest tire shop... even if it's only a few miles down the road. Sometimes it's good to know how to do things yourself.

Next time I change a tire, I may video it to show a technique I developed that makes the job really fast and easy. I would try to describe the process but it's very hard to put into words.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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05-13-15, 10:11 PM   #19  
I've only done a few tires in my life but I found that smaller tires/wheels are much harder than larger to a point. The larger, like standard passenger car tires, are large enough to hold yet still have soft enough rubber to stretch them over the rim. Smaller wheels are almost impossible to hold by hand and THAT makes them much harder to change.

Now, IF a person has a means of solidly holding the wheel then changing the tire on a smaller wheel should not be a huge chore. But that is a huge IF.

I would say that IF a person was changing tires on a more-or-less frequent basis AND had the room to mount one, then one of the Harbor Freight tire changing machines (about $40, less with coupon) might be a good investment.

I need to either dismount, clean, inspect and remount the front tires on my lawnmower project or add tubes because one of them goes flat in a day or two. I will try to do it myself but if I have any difficulty I won't hesitate in taking it to a tire shop or lawnmower shop to get it done. My time, and mostly my frustration levels don't allow for me to spend several hours fighting such trivial matters.

Remember, sometimes the most important tool in a DIYer's tool box is the checkbook.

 
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05-14-15, 03:27 AM   #20  
taught me how to break the bead from a car tire by riding over the edge of the tire with the car
I've never done that but have used a bumper jack set on the tire relying on the weight of the vehicle to break the bead ..... of course the kids today would probably want to know what a bumper jack is


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05-14-15, 03:28 AM   #21  
Say cheese

Quote from cheese:
Because the name of this site is Doityourself.com.
That's true but sometimes people make it Do It The Hard Way dot com & that's what I see now. There were many times when it was the other way around. Getting a professional was recommended when I thought that there was no reason, for it.

 
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05-14-15, 03:35 AM   #22  
I postponed putting tubes in the "front" tires of my riding mowers for quite a few years by using that canned aerosol tire sealant; same thing with wheelbarrow and snowblower tires. On fairly rough terrain, we were constantly breaking beads with tubeless tires and then picking up dirt which added more fun.

The aerosol sealants bought us some time; but the "tubes" have their place !

 
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05-15-15, 03:10 AM   #23  
Well.....

Learned a few things, little late though.

Few notes:

-- 39, slightly warmer in garage didn't help

-- my large screwdrivers weren't near large enough

-- we used to have 4 or 5 garages in town that actually worked on things, now we only have convenience stores.

-- My time, and mostly my frustration levels don't allow for me to spend several hours fighting such trivial matters.

Amen to that! Patience is something I'm definitely lacking.

No problem getting the bead broke then downhill from there, those tires were stiff.

After narrowly missing my TV with a screwdriver I decided to call it a day. Wrapped a rope around the tire and managed to air it up again, thanks for that tip.

Yesterday I found why it needed air every week or so, small bead leak on the inner bead. Rim looks fine, no dents or anything.

First video I watched yesterday (day late) had a guy fumbling around on the floor with two bars. He was 6+ minutes in and hadn't got the first side off....too painful to watch.

So--

ordered that mini tire changer from HF. Has to be easier with it bolted to my bench.

Question: one video mentioned 'bead sealer' goop, is this worth it or is soap and water just as good? Max pressure on these tires is only 12#. Reviews mention it can be messy.

Thanks as always.

 
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05-15-15, 03:29 AM   #24  
As you now know - it's easier to do it when the weather [or at least the tire] is warm

I've always just used soap. It shouldn't hurt anything to exceed the max air pressure while seating the bead just don't over do it or forget to lower the pressure when you are done.


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05-15-15, 04:07 AM   #25  
Some things just can't be fully appreciated by those who haven't been there !

 
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05-15-15, 05:00 AM   #26  
Some things just can't be fully appreciated by those who haven't been there !
You got that right. Going slightly astray, I have to take my hat off to people who work on cars now days. When I look at my kids newer vehicles I just shake my head.

Few years ago I bought a really nice 89 K1500. Although I was happy it looked and ran so good I almost wet myself when he opened the hood--you could actually see the spark plugs without standing on your head.

Okay, I'll stick with the soap and warm them up good.

Thanks

 
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05-15-15, 05:24 AM   #27  
Did you tell your brother what happened? He's the one who you quoted as saying, it's a piece of cake.

 
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05-15-15, 06:12 AM   #28  
Yes I did. He called yesterday wondering if I had it done so we had a rather lengthy discussion which I can't repeat here. Little brothers are such a pain.

 
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05-15-15, 06:24 AM   #29  
LOL. I can imagine what was said. I hope that you told him to come to your house & do the job.

 
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05-15-15, 10:36 AM   #30  
I just looked at several videos and every one showed much more work involved than it should be... those guys are struggling to change a tire. I have never posted a video on you tube, but we just got a new camera and there is a need for a video showing how to do this, so give me some time and I'll see about getting one up.


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05-15-15, 11:41 AM   #31  
Please do and thanks!

 
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05-15-15, 09:04 PM   #32  
Also looking forward to it cheese, and as I have done in the past for you, let me know if you want to send me the file and I can post it on youtube for you.
Just make sure you note in the video any credits you wish to have added

Well I thought it was video maybe it was just pics, I bet you will remember this rig

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Last edited by BFHFixit; 05-15-15 at 09:22 PM.
 
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05-15-15, 11:30 PM   #33  
Lol, yep... that's the racing mower I built years ago for the high school kid working for me in the afternoons when he got out of school. That's him on the mower. Good fun. I remember outrunning a guy on a 4 wheeler with that thing and the look he gave me!


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05-18-15, 12:51 PM   #34  
Warmer weekend so I thought I'd see if I could stop that bead leak whilst waiting for my changer machine....arriving thursday via Pony Express.

Cleaned everything good, (inside of rim is spotless) lots of soap this time and no joy. Accidentally put 20# in and it still leaks when I press on just this one spot:


http://vid25.photobucket.com/albums/...psxuvzojod.mp4


Rotated the tire a bit and tried again, leak follows the tire so the rim is fine. Ordered a couple tubes and an extra tire today, I will get this fixed come hell or high water.

 
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05-18-15, 02:25 PM   #35  
How much have you spent so far including the items that you ordered? It was 5 days ago that I suggested to pay a tire shop to do the job. Two answers by someone other than the OP were, the shops are too far away & not all of us are overflowing with $$$.

 
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05-18-15, 02:35 PM   #36  
That tire in the video looks pretty good . . . . I'd consider giving that aeresol latex sealant a try. I only used about ⅛ of a can on a lawnmower tire.

 
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05-18-15, 02:45 PM   #37  
I went to Wally*World this morning and while in the automotive department I read the blurb on the can of Fix-A-Flat. It stated that after using the product you should get the tire professionally repaired within a a few days or 100 miles.

Reading the instructions on the bottle of Slime it states to remove the product before a year lapses. It seems that neither product is a permanent fix.

I think I will just add the inner tube since I have it on hand.

 
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05-18-15, 03:40 PM   #38  
Two years ago I bought new bicycle tires and they are filled with a bluish type goo. Suppose to be flat resistant. Never had a problem yet, but when I go to inflate or top off the pressure that bluish stuff spits out the fill valve.

 
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05-18-15, 04:51 PM   #39  
I have used slime on riding mower tires that were weather checked and leaking on the sidewalls. Slime sealed that and it held for the next 4 years I still had the mower.
I don't recommend the aerosol fix flat since it really messy and maybe even toxic.
Neither is a permanent fix for auto or higher speed tires since most of it remains liquid in the tire and can affect balance, but for slower moving tires, I have never had any issue with the Slime product.

 
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05-18-15, 05:49 PM   #40  
This is getting personal now and the stubbornness is setting in.

I've spent around $80 for the machine, tire and tube. If I knew of a place fairly close to do this I'd be there in a minute. Like I said earlier, we have nothing but Holiday, 7-11 and General Dollar.

Yes, the tire looks good but that bead leak just won't quit. I'm sure a tube would do it but because I bought a tire last fall I'll throw that on too.

Everything will be here later this week so let the fun begin. What can happen?

 
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