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Briggs & Stratton 42A707 Engine Starting Problem


bnesbit's Avatar
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06-09-15, 08:28 PM   #1  
Briggs & Stratton 42A707 Engine Starting Problem

I have a Murray Lawn Tractor with a 17hp Briggs and Stratton 42A707 2653-E1 engine that worked great up until a few days ago. I was using it fairly heavily for a couple of days pulling a trailer with wood and later mowing some tall grass when the engine slowed and died over about 6-10 seconds from running normally. I noticed some smoke rising from the engine. I checked the oil, and noticed smoke was coming out of the dipstick tube, and the oil was empty. I check the oil fairly regularly, so was surprised to see it was empty.

I'm not sure how damaged the engine is, or where to start repairing it. The flywheel/crankshaft now is very resistant to turning (I'm not sure how freely it should move), and the starter certainly can't turn it, even after charging. I've checked that there aren't obstructions in the pully or drive belt.

Any suggestions or steps for how I go about repairing this would be greatly appreciated by the DIY community.

Thanks,

Barry

 
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cheese's Avatar
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06-10-15, 01:09 AM   #2  
The engine has seized and there is aluminum transfer to the crankshaft in the engine. You'll need to tear it apart to see how bad it is. It may have galled the block, or it may just be a seized rod. Inspection will tell.


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06-10-15, 08:01 AM   #3  
Thanks for your swift reply, Cheese.

It's perhaps a bit demanding for my limited technical knowledge, however I've always wanted to know more about engines. I'll start dismantling it to see what's going in. If it is a seized rod or there is aluminum transfer to the crankshaft I suspect I'll be able to readily see that. However, I have no idea what a galled block might look like as I have no idea what that means.

 
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06-10-15, 09:52 AM   #4  
Galling is when metal transfers from onemetal piece to another because of friction. The holes where the crankshaft pass through the block are the most likely spots for this to happen.


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06-10-15, 11:25 AM   #5  
Fill it full of automatic transmission fluid, put a wrench on the crankshaft and turn it backward until it loosens up then forwards for a while, drain and fill with fresh oil and away you go, it might smoke a little. Have a good one. Geo

 
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06-10-15, 01:58 PM   #6  
Hi Geogrub - thanks for your answer. Do you mean filling the oil tank full of transmission fluid then forcing the flywheel back and forth might help unstick the crankshaft? Is this a proven method of addressing this kind of problem?

 
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06-10-15, 03:09 PM   #7  
You might get it started this way but there is aluminum transfer in the engine. You may break it loose and get it to run again, but it will come apart, guaranteed. It might last 2 minutes or two years, but when it blows, there will likely be no fixing it. There is a chance of fixing it now.


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06-10-15, 04:23 PM   #8  
Of course Cheese is right for the long term, I have had 2 different Briggs engines that were seized when I got them, they came loose and I used them to mow grass for a long time, neither quit before I sold them. When it was ran without oil more than just the crank went without oil, the valve train, rings and cylinder did not get any lube either. Yes, type F tran fluid in the crankcase it is very detergent and penetrates where other stuff doesn't, don't run it more than 30 seconds with the tran fluid then replace the oil. Have a good one. Geo

 
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06-10-15, 05:36 PM   #9  
Ok, thanks. I think I'll have a go at taking the engine apart first, inspect it, and assuming I am able to detect that aluminum transfer I'll wash it out using muriatic acid (researched from another site).

It looks like removing the flywheel and crankshaft is going to be an interesting challenge, I haven't yet found very concise directions for doing it with this particular engine, however I'll keep researching.

 
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06-10-15, 08:54 PM   #10  
To remove the nut holding the flywheel you must lock the engine, the easiest and safest way is to remove the spark plug and load the cylinder with small rope, like starter pull rope, when the engine tries to compress the rope it locks, remove the rope when finished. If you are going to take the engine apart forget using the tran fluid, that process is only for not taking it apart. Have a good one. Geo

 
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