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A ? about Kohler Engines and Engine swaps on Snapper Z rider


ih4630's Avatar
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06-30-15, 08:50 AM   #1  
A ? about Kohler Engines and Engine swaps on Snapper Z rider

I bought a beater Snapper Yard Crusier HZ15420KVE. I was told the engine started knocking then locked up. The Engine is a CV 15 SV. It didn't throw anything through the block. But I'm guessing it's trash? I priced these new on the net and they cost more than the mower is worth, even if it has no other problems. I was assured it does not. I'm no mechanic. Just and old guy with a tool box and a shade tree. Bought the mower just as a project. Could I rebuild and engine? No. But i do think I could change one out.

My next question. Since Kohlers are expensive. I don't see many used ones listed for sale. But I do see a lot of used Briggs. Not knowing for sure the condition of the remainder of the mower. I was thinking of picking up a used Briggs or borrowing one for the re-power. At least to test the other components.The mower left the factory with a Kohler. Which appears to be sitting on a factory plate on top of the frame. So would I have to drill new holes in the frame to mount a Briggs? Also, I was told that all single cylinder Briggs verticals from about 8 hp up have same spacing where mounting to the frames concerned.

Sounds a little far fetched to me. But i thought I'd get you guys to confirm it ether way.

As always. Thanks in advance.
IH


Last edited by ih4630; 06-30-15 at 10:45 AM.
 
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Pilot Dane's Avatar
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06-30-15, 11:19 AM   #2  
Do you have a machine shop or metal fabricating tools? Do you like to bang your head against the wall, curse and throw wrenches? My two cents is you should just walk away. If it were a commercial quality machine I'd consider swapping engines. In this case I'd look into repairing the existing engine.

If you want to swap then an engine swap is possible on almost anything but the devil is in the details. First very carefully measure everything to make sure your new engine will fit. Pay special attention to the shaft on the old engine and make sure the new one has the same. Make sure both engines rotate in the same direction. Then look at the exhaust. Does a stock exhaust for the new engine fit in the available space. Then look at the carburetor and air cleaner to make sure it too has room. Then look at the location of the throttle and choke connections.

Some engine swaps can go rather easily but quite often you find that there is some bit of metal in the way on the frame that needs to be cut away. Or you need to fabricate a bracket or redo the control linkages. It can be a very frustrating experience if you aren't experienced and don't have the tools to cut, fix or fabricate as needed.

 
ih4630's Avatar
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06-30-15, 11:46 AM   #3  
Thanks, not what I wanted to hear. But you make good points. I was thinking some of these came new with Briggs? Maybe not.

Never had any dealings with a Kohler. Everyone I've talked to said to trash the Intech Briggs when they knock then lock up. As a general rule. Can this series Kholer be rebuilt at a reasonable price? I would have to hire the work done. Again, I don't claim to be a mechanic.

IH

 
aka pedro's Avatar
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06-30-15, 11:55 AM   #4  
Just an "aye" to what Pilot Dane said. I have had a few successes swapping brands or models on push mowers, rototillers, and snow blowers, but none that I recall without at least a few modifications. And sometimes anyway, the engines are proprietary to a certain piece of equipment. A few years ago I replaced a head gasket on the Kohler Command in my Toro mower, both common names of course, but, long story short, that gasket was not so common, because it turned out to be specific to the engine that Toro used on that particular series of machines. So you have to be attentive to the smallest details. If it were me, I would at least open up the engine that's on it, and see what the problem might be, and, if not repairable, would probably scrap it, even though I'm old school too so don't prefer going there.

 
cheese's Avatar
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06-30-15, 06:48 PM   #5  
The CV15S is a common engine. Bolt pattern is the same, exhaust will be different as well as throttle hookup and possibly electrical connections. Check crankshaft lengths and diameters. Heck the cv15s should be fairly easy to find I would think... I have a few here at my shop.


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06-30-15, 08:07 PM   #6  
Guys, thanks for your input. Cheese, I sent you a personal message.

ih

 
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