SnowBlower Impeller Paddles

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  #1  
Old 01-21-16, 01:12 PM
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SnowBlower Impeller Paddles

l mentioned last year that I was adding "paddles" to the Impeller of my MTD SnowBlower (Branded under White Outdoor Equipment) . . . . and I did so.

This post is just to provide a little update on how well they're working. This was on a 26" Two Stage SnowBlower driven by a 8HP Tecumseh Engine.

I didn't initially take my Blower apart in order to install these; but I bought a used Impeller off of eBay, and modified it before doing the installation (I still have my original Impeller intact).

For "paddles", I made my own design, using fiberglass reinforced rubber truck mudflaps, over " thick. I also slotted them about " so that they might be advanced a little as they wear (maybe once per season).

This is what they looked like before being mounted on the Impeller:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]61890[/ATTACH]

And here they are mounted on the Impeller that I bought for this purpose:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]61891[/ATTACH]

I can now report that after a couple snowfalls this season, I am very pleased with the improved power these Paddles are providing; and they have cleaned out the barrel of all slush and the chute has never yet gotten clogged. It's behaving like a different machine.

Without exaggerating I think they are shooting my discharged snow about 25% further that I experienced before . . . . around 25 to 30' instead of the 15 to 22' I was getting when clearing the same areas around my farm. I think this is due to the paddles occupying the "fastest" moving portion of the Impeller's Blades when they fill in that space between the previous tips and the perimeter of the barrel being filled by the Auger . . . . between ⅜" and "; the area where ice typically accumulates on these machines.

Elsewhere on the internet, some people suggest that you can install "Paddles" by operating through the chute and using self-tapping screws . . . . without removing the Impeller. I don't think that method would have resulted in my being as pleased as I am. I' know myself well enough to know that reaching down through the chute to measure and drill holes would have driven me nuts; just say'in !

So that's my story . . . . and I can now understand why the manufacturers don't offer this feature. It wouldn't be understood or appreciated by the general public, and would add significantly to the cost of the unit.
 
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  #2  
Old 01-22-16, 07:02 PM
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Impressive. Very impressive!
 
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Old 01-23-16, 10:04 AM
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Awesome job.

I can now understand why the manufacturers don't offer this feature. It wouldn't be understood or appreciated by the general public, and would add significantly to the cost of the unit.
I agree but the manufacturer could do a little better job on the impeller/blower design. I think the idea of large gaps was to allow room for debris to be blown thru without jamming the impeller.
 
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Old 01-23-16, 01:51 PM
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Thanks for reading . . . . I did my work on this last April and May; so I've been waiting quite a while to find out if there was any benefit, so I guess it's a bit of deferred gratification.

One of the other, and minor, benefits is that I no longer have to be so concerned about the position the impeller blades were left in when I put the machine away in an un-heated barn. To avoid the blades being frozen in position, I had developed the habit of always bringing the impeller to a stop so that two(2) of the blades were at 4 O'Clock and 8 O'Clock, and nothing was left sitting down at the bottom at 6 O'Clock in whatever snow and ice might melt and accumulate down there to freeze the impeller in place.

With so little snow and ice sticking to the inside circumference of the impeller barrel., there's hardly anything to melt. I did put a coat of axle grease on that metal surface in order to break in the "paddles" as there are the heads of some carriage bolts that have to be accommodated; so that may partially explain why there's less sticking this year.

I've been watching the news and some of the people in the mid-atlantic states using their hardly-broken-in snowblowers to move some snow around and I'm surprised by the contrast between my machine's performance and what these people seem to be satisfied with . . . . we're probably burning the same amount of fuel; but some of them are only shooting snow 8 or 10' (maybe at an idle?), while my machine is creating a Rooster Tail or an arc of expelled snow about 25' high and 40' long (without the wind assisting) . . . . nothing wimpy about it !

I've had this blower for 8 years and have made a few minor improvements as time passed: improved the Wiring Harness for the Heated Hand Grips; a real Dipstick; a few strategically placed Grease Fittings; a Fuel Filter and Shut-Off; and Inner Tubes in the Tires . . . . but these Paddles are my most valuable alteration so far.

Next Month, I'm adding a rectifier and a bunch of LED Running lights so that I don't get run over during a blizzard !

Anyway, thanks again for reading . . . . I didn't think I'd have any audience for something this obscure. I guess you had to have been there ?
 
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Old 01-23-16, 03:35 PM
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Next thing you need to do is convert the engine to run on propane and that will forever end the problems of stale gasoline.
 
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Old 01-23-16, 03:41 PM
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Next thing you need to do is convert the engine to run on propane and that will forever end the problems of stale gasoline.
Now that's an idea worth looking into!
 
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Old 01-23-16, 03:44 PM
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Next Month, I'm adding a rectifier and a bunch of LED Running lights so that I don't get run over during a blizzard !
Even though my snowblower has a head light I wear one of those head light bands myself. I always have light where I'm looking. It makes shoveling and snow blowing much nicer and on coming traffic always sees me.
 
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Old 01-23-16, 04:51 PM
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Here's my snowblower improvement/modification.
After posting this originally several years ago.... I find it all over the internet.

Name:  Snowblower gearbox with grease fitting.jpg
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Old 01-23-16, 05:05 PM
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I saw PJ's picture a few weeks ago and it caused me to think "why" have I been putting 140 weight liquid gear lubricant into that little hole with the plastic plug ?

I went to my MTD Owners' Manual and it was absolutely silent on what kind of grease should be going into that Auger Gearbox !

I've never taken mine apart, and I've never turned it upside down to see if liquid pours out . . . . so maybe I'm running a mixed up version of the two ?
 
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Old 01-23-16, 05:07 PM
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I had the original Toro gearbox self destroy itself when it was a few years old. I rebuilt it, added the grease fitting, give it a few pumps every year and the snow blower is over 30 years old.
 
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Old 01-24-16, 04:57 AM
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few pumps every year and the snow blower is over 30 years old.
Probably why the manufacture doesn't do it.
 
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Old 01-24-16, 06:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Furd
Next thing you need to do is convert the engine to run on propane and that will forever end the problems of stale gasoline
You know, in 8 years that has not been much of a problem for me. The only issue I've had with the carburetion has been a "surging" caused by the Idle Restricter Valve/Needle getting clogged with debris or gasoline deposits. I've added the cleaning of the passages in that valve to my annual PM routine and don't have much of a problem in that area. I've never even taken the Float Bowl off . . . . knocking on wood.

Up here, you'd better do all of your work on a SnowBlower during the warmer months as you don't want to be fiddling around in mid-winter with a problem machine. I don't have a "heated" barn or garage, and it's currently -17F outside (but no snow).
 
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