2 stroke/cycle OPE Carburetors and fuel line routing

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  #1  
Old 01-30-16, 05:46 PM
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2 stroke/cycle OPE Carburetors and fuel line routing

I am starting this thread with the intent to localize some info on the fore mentioned equipment. Specifically the fuel line routing and adjustments and types of these tiny mite carbs.
I have recently relocated from the PAC NW where fuel line deterioration was not a huge factor. Since coming back to the Heartland, I have in the last few days been infiltrated with equipment with completely rotted, brittle and missing fuel lines.
I know there is a lot of knowledge here and folks with web pages or links that have plenty of information. Personally I can discern all the different types of carbs by trial and error, be it Walbro or Zama. It seems from my experience in the last few days however, that there are many types, connections, primer, no primer, choke only, primer and choke etc.

Hope to see all participate, for our own reference if nothing else and provide a wealth of info to others as well.
 
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Old 01-31-16, 11:57 AM
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Here is one routing for you. Have a good one. Geo

[ATTACH=CONFIG]62317[/ATTACH]
 
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Old 01-31-16, 12:15 PM
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Anyway I had a really nice one. Just a little problem getting it here. I saved it off to a word doc. This is from Fixya.
 
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Old 01-31-16, 12:59 PM
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Good idea for a thread!
If a person can unserstand how it works, they can figure out the routing for any of them.

The line with the fuel filter always is long enough to reach the bottom of the tank no matter which way it's turned.

That line then goes to the inlet port on the carb. It's not always easy to tell which is the inlet port, but it's usually going in close to the side of the carb with the metering valve. If you still aren't sure, take the metering valve cover off and blow some wd40 through the port while pressing down on the metering valve lever. When WD40 comes out the needle, you have found the correct port.

The other port will be the return. If you have no externally mounted primer, this goes straight to the tank.

If you have a primer not mounted directly on the carb, you will run a line from the carb return to the primer. Press the primer and see which port on it blows out air. Connect the return line fron the carb to the OTHER port (the one that sucks in when you let go of the primer). Then connect a line from the port that blows out to the return hole in the tank. It only needs to extend into the tank an inch or so.

Contrary to popular belief, the primer does not prime the engine with shots of gas on these 2-strokes like it does on the larger 4-strokes. The primer only pulls gas into the carburetor and purges the air out of the system to make it easier to start. It pulls it through the filter, then the carb, to the primer, and back to the tank.
 

Last edited by cheese; 02-01-16 at 10:21 AM.
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Old 01-31-16, 05:17 PM
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Good stuff guys thanks!
Just to add a bit:
The metering side cover will have 2,3 or four small screws around the perimeter, the other side one larger screw in the middle of the cover and on the side the idle speed setting screw is.
Normally, other than debris in the carb, the metering diaphragm (I have seen this referred to this as the "fuel pump") is what I find most common as it has become stiff, IE: will not have a uniform dome shape.
If different sized fuel lines are used, it does make it easier to discern the routing,(as in geo's post) however it is not always easy to tell if all of the fuel lines are gone or just pieces in the tank.

 
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Old 01-31-16, 05:31 PM
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Use nonethanal fuel and eliminate at least 99% of the fuel lines and carb. issues.
Regular "Stabl" does nothing to prevent the issues caused by ethanal in the gas.
 
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Old 01-31-16, 05:53 PM
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Actually while that does help, it is not readily and some areas not available. Also, I think more of an issue is storage. Once a piece of equipment sets for some time there is not enough fuel left in the lines or the carb to completely cause deterioration to the point of disintegration.
Also, newer fuel line is much more compatible with current fuel so, that is even less of an issue.
 
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Old 02-01-16, 10:25 AM
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Yeah, we used to have these problems before the ethanol showed up in fuel. The ethanol just makes bad stuff happen faster and easier than it used to. I do recommend using non-ethanol fuel but it won't be a magic bullet and stop carburetor and fuel line problems.
 
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