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The WORX Lawn Trimmers


Norm201's Avatar
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09-17-16, 12:46 PM   #1  
The WORX Lawn Trimmers

I returned my Craftsman grass trimmer (after three months of use). Sears was gracious enough to give me a store credit towards any other product and I was fine with that. Try as I might I could not stand that trimmer.

Anyway a couple of people at work suggested The WORX Grass trimmer. After seeing their web site and watching their videos I'm sold! I will be buying one of them.

My question! There are two models (among many) that I'm considering. One is the 20 volt and the other is the 32 volt. Between the two models everything is the same except the voltage. They both use .065 twisted string. Is there any real advantage to the 32 volt unit at an extra cost of $50? I have a very large area to trim. Including a fence on both sides that is on a corner lot that curves outward (means 6 sides, and sidewalk along the long side of fence and front of house that will include edging on both sides).

Both units are supplied with two lithium batteries, free line for as long a you own it (pay for shipping) and a three year warranty. Third party line can be used but not recommended. The unit is a trimmer, edger and mini mower. I have no doubt about the quality but is the extra voltage going be any advantage in terms of length of time in use or force of cutting power?

 
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09-17-16, 12:51 PM   #2  
Any device will run more efficiently and therefore longer on higher voltage.
In my opinion..... for only a $50 difference it would be well worth the extra to go with the higher voltage.


~ Pete ~

 
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09-17-16, 01:03 PM   #3  
Woxx

I believe the 50 volt model will be heavier to carry, if that makes any difference.

 
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09-17-16, 01:14 PM   #4  
Wire, I don't think the slightly extra weight will make much difference. Especially since I'm going from a gas to a battery unit.

PJ, I believe you are right. That's all I needed was that bit of a push to buy the 32 volt unit.

Thanks to both of you.

 
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09-17-16, 02:03 PM   #5  
I don't intend to throw a wrench in your decision, but before you buy, check to see if parts are available should it become necessary. One of my helpers had a Worx pressure washer and when he ran it low on oil and broke the piston rod, there is no place to get parts. The engine was Japanese and everything we found had to be interpreted.

While not as heavy duty as the one you are probably looking for, I bought wifey the Ryobi 18v string trimmer. She can handle it well and it cuts mild stuff. I cut the larger stuff with solid blades on my Husq.

 
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09-17-16, 02:29 PM   #6  
Larry, I thought about the spare parts problem and you're right, parts to fix them is tough. But the quality is there and I don't expect to have any major repair. They can't be any worse than the new stuff out their by the current major brands. Besides its a motor. Not much should go wrong. Not like a gas engine that requires lots of maintenance. Just turn it on and off.
I looked at them all and none do what I want except WORX. I'm willing to risk the repair factor for the feature I want or need.

 
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09-17-16, 04:16 PM   #7  
I disagree with PJ when he states that a higher voltage is more efficient.

As for the "spare parts" problem I DO agree it is an important question. I bought a (genuine) Weedeater (model 509) back in the 1980s. Everything on that machine is still fine and dandy some 30 years later EXCEPT the string head itself. But, I cannot replace the string head to save my life. I've tried other string trimmers but they all lack the power of the original Weedeater.

In conjunction with my electric riding lawnmower project I bought a new Ryobi 24 volt string trimmer without battery or charger on ebay for what I considered to be a decent price, about $35 including shipping. I made an adapter to fit in place of the battery that allowed me to attach a forty-foot power cord which plugs into a jack on the mower. The original string didn't feed all that well but after that was gone I used some string I had bought at Harbor Freight and now the little tool works very well.

I then checked for reviews on this trimmer and they were mixed. Some stated that it was poorly constructed, the motor screws would fall out and then the unit would self-destruct. Others related the problem with the self-feeding string not advancing that I mentioned. Still others complained about the short run time with the self-contained battery, which obviously was not a concern of mine. But I WAS concerned about the motor burning up or the screws coming loose as well as some parts simply wearing out.

What I have done is to find and purchase a replacement motor (with screws) as well as the string housing. I've looked at the entire machine and see no plastic parts that are really weak or I suspect won't last for many, many years other than the string reel and the string head cap. I have found that this trimmer is already considered "obsolete" and some parts are no longer available. I am attempting to buy four replacement string reels as well as four replacement string head caps. If I am successful I should have enough spares to last well past my lifetime.

Norm, I strongly suggest that you do the same, determine the parts that will wear under normal use and stock up on them now as well as a spare motor and any special mounting hardware. Then all you need to worry about is the battery proper and you can almost make book that Worx will change the battery connection in the future and stop making the proper replacement. At that time you will need to get creative in making a battery adapter but otherwise the machine should last you for many years.

 
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09-17-16, 08:19 PM   #8  
As far as what voltage to go, go as high as feels comfortable regarding weight. In your case, and especially used to using gas power, the extra will not even be noticeable.
The difference in voltage is best described by using this analogy, consider your battery voltage to be a well, it will give you a longer run time and more consistent output for a longer time.

I believe battery power is the way to go for home owners who mainly maintain a small home lot. One other thing to consider is what other type of OPE or tools can use the same power sources. Myself, I have found Black&Decker products to suit my needs quite well. They offer many products from power tools to OPE that will use the same batteries. They are available widely in nearly all hardware and department stores, and have been around for quite some time and have a good rep.

As far as parts...??? Face it, even with a gas unit most lower end residential units are only expected to last 3 years. By the time you put any annual maintenance in, not to mention fuel and oil, even if the electric lasts the same time and the motor goes out (other than maybe a switch or attachment, there are no other parts) You have saved fuel and oil and frustration and maybe gain a pound or two from not pulling your shoulder out.


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09-17-16, 11:03 PM   #9  
Comparing voltage to a well is accurate enough, but you have to consider the amperage draw too, which in this analogy would be the how fast the pump is pumping that well dry. If both had the same amperage motor, the higher voltage unit should run longer and more steadily, but I bet the bigger voltage unit has a higher amp motor paired with it. In other words, it doesn't automatically mean it will run longer if the voltage is higher.

I agree about parts and lower end units only being made to last a short while. It amounts to about the same either way you choose.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!


Last edited by cheese; 09-17-16 at 11:59 PM.
 
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09-18-16, 06:20 AM   #10  
FURD, BFHFixit,and cheese.

I hear ya. Furd you make good points but I'm pretty much past the point of makeshift and work arounds on broken stuff. At one time Weed Eater was the premier unit and very well built. But now they are cheap and break often. We get many back for returns and refunds at the store. Even my boss says not to buy a WEED Eater.

I just as soon buy a new unit. I have to agree with the way BFH and Cheese are looking at it. And Cheese, you are correct about the motor amperage. They make it clear that the 20 volt and 32 volt batteries are not interchangeable.

The reviews are all good on the WORX brand. Only one or two bad ones.

BTW...I did in fact order the 32 volt unit. And if worse case scenario I have thirty days to return for refund (less shipping of course). It has all the features I want and no other brand does. So I think I'm good. Besides it's my birthday present. Any excuse will do.

Oh. My wife is pleased because she now has a $79 gift card to spend at Sears for the returned unit.

 
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09-18-16, 04:19 PM   #11  
Between the two models everything is the same except the voltage.
Comparing voltage to a well is accurate enough, but you have to consider the amperage draw too, which in this analogy would be the how fast the pump is pumping that well dry.

I agree cheese, however the output would be the size of the bucket dipping into that well. In this case the two units are basically the same, (I have the same situation with two B&D string trimmers) so both have the same size buckets, but one has a bigger well to draw from.


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09-18-16, 10:03 PM   #12  
Size of the bucket, speed of the pump, how thirsty the elephant drinking from the well is... same difference. A better analogy for voltage compared to water would be how much pressure is behind it, instead of the size of the well but I digress. Battery capacity also matters. Just like how a 1.5 volt "D" cell lasts many times longer then a 1.5 volt button cell under the same load. Both have the same voltage, or pressure, but that is more where the "size of the well" comes into appropriate analogy. It seems that worx doesn't advertise their motor amperage, wattage, or HP on many of their units, so I can't say whether they're the same draw or not.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!


Last edited by cheese; 09-18-16 at 10:58 PM.
 
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09-19-16, 06:51 AM   #13  
Posted By: cheese Battery capacity also matters. Just like how a 1.5 volt "D" cell lasts many times longer then a 1.5 volt button cell under the same load. Both have the same voltage, or pressure, but that is more where the "size of the well" comes into appropriate analogy. It seems that worx doesn't advertise their motor amperage, wattage, or HP on many of their units, so I can't say whether they're the same draw or not.
I noticed that, too. No mention of Amp-Hour capacity of the batteries. Often a mfr will make a 20V battery pack using large "C" cells, then might use "AA" size cells in the 32V "upgrade" pack in order to not get inconveniently large or heavy. The smaller cells would have much less capacity (run time) all else being equal.

I recently bought a Dewalt 20Vmax string trimmer with 5AH batteries and I'm totally impressed with runtime and how well it's made. I haven't touched my nice RedMax gas trimmer since I opened the box on the rechargeable one. I like the idea of the wheels and metal guide bar on the Worx but wonder if the extra weight swinging those around all the time is worth it? Keeping the head light contributes greatly to control and reducing fatigue.

 
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10-05-16, 04:59 AM   #14  
Just a follow up. I got my Worx trimmer and have used it twice so far. I like it. Does what it says. Easy to use and does a good job. Took about a half hour to understand how to set it up for each of three uses, but that's just me. Once you know how, it's fast and easy to convert from trimmer, to edger, to mini mower.

Not perfect, but I'm still thinking of my old Craftsman. The more I use the Works, the more I'll like it. Battery lasted for the duration of my yard work, but was low when used used on next occasion. Over the years I'm sure the battery won't quite make a full yard run. But I have two batteries, so I'm good.

If anybody is considering one of these right now there is an end of season sale. I could've saved $20 if I waited till now to order. I highly recommend this unit for typical yard work. Not for heavy duty use.

 
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10-05-16, 06:41 AM   #15  
Can you tell me what you're supposed to push/pull/beat to twist the powerhead from trimmer to edger? My SIL has one of these & I tried to use it Sunday (as a favor--he was gone hunting) but gave up when I couldn't get the head to rotate.
Not sure if I'm too dumb to figure out the adjustments or if it's too caked up with grass residue to function.

 
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10-05-16, 02:38 PM   #16  
Can you tell me what you're supposed to push/pull/beat to twist the powerhead?
You step on the guard and lift up on the handle. The head (or handle) will rotate.



Last edited by Norm201; 10-05-16 at 02:42 PM. Reason: added graphic
 
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