Trouble starting snow thrower

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  #1  
Old 02-07-17, 01:26 PM
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Trouble starting snow thrower

I have a Ariens 724 snow thrower that i'm having problems starting.


Manual says to set choke to one click on, prime engine 1-3 times, put throttle in run position, pull starter cord till engine starts.

I tried this many times,but no luck.
I think its my technic in way to start. Out of frustration. I Pumped the primer many times with no luck. Eventually I resorted to the electric starter to start.

Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 02-07-17, 03:41 PM
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Look down the throat of the carb when you pump the primer. See if you're getting gas down there.
 
  #3  
Old 02-07-17, 03:44 PM
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A cold engine should be fully choked for at least the first pull or two.
 
  #4  
Old 02-07-17, 03:45 PM
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Were you using fresh gas?

You may have to fully set the choke...not sure if by one click you mean slightly choked, or almost fully choked...try fully choked. Be prepared to open the choke at least a little as soon as it starts.

If it doesn't start after a couple of pulls, prime it a few more times and try again. If it still doesn't start, back off on the choke and do a few pulls without further priming.
 
  #5  
Old 02-07-17, 04:21 PM
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I agree with most of the posters, but we need more info.
Is this brand new, if no how was it stored?
A low use power tool like this should have only non ethanal fuel used, allowed to run out of fuel at the end of the season.
Been a few years then by now the carburetor is going have to be compleatly rebuilt and cleaned.
 
  #6  
Old 02-07-17, 04:45 PM
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If the Electric AC Starter was successful while the Recoil Starter failed, everything else being equal, I'd surmise that it's just the "speed" of your pull when it's frigid outside ?

I enjoy the presence of that Electric Starter on my snowblower; but I still want to periodically test my technique with the Recoil Starter because that's what I have to rely on when I run out of gas hundreds of feet away from an AC outlet, or when the power is out.

Maybe you are just out of practice and were not giving it enough of a "snap" ?

I'd suggest a few practice starts when the engine is already warm, and starting IS NOT critical.
 
  #7  
Old 02-08-17, 01:45 PM
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Thanks everyone for your replies

I was able to get started today: Full choke, full RPM run for start, using manual rope start. ......
I wondered if I was not pulling the rope starter fast enough.

Will post back tomorrow after machine has
sat overnight.
 
  #8  
Old 02-08-17, 02:32 PM
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The important thing is that your snowblower will pull start when hot.

Mine always runs out of gas on the way to my neighbors and 250' away from power.
 
  #9  
Old 02-10-17, 12:26 PM
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Angry

This morning the temp was 10 degrees ,and tried starting again.
No "joy"

Out of frustration, I pumped the primer bulb (9) times ...ZOOM..... Started right up!

Comments please
 
  #10  
Old 02-10-17, 01:40 PM
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My owners manual also says to prime 3-4 times but I do it until I feel some resistance in the bulb - usually 7 or 8 times.

I've never tried to start mine manually. The electric start is immediate. Even if there's enough gas in the tank I always top it off before starting it. I'm too lazy to hump gas all the way to the end of my drive and too nervous that it wouldn't pull start easily. I have a limited number of pulls in my arm.
 
  #11  
Old 02-10-17, 01:56 PM
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Nine times won't be a deal breaker . . . . but I did go and read my Tecumseh instructions (for the 1st time in 10 years) and noticed the following:

You're supposed to make sure you have placed your thumb over the vent hole in the Primer Bulb (I suppose a finger will do if you''re a contrarian);

You're supposed to hold the bulb in for one (1) full second following each time it's pushed; and

You're supposed to repeat this Primer Bulb pushing twice making it three (3) pushes total.

Now, I suspect that if your bulb pushing technique is different from Tecumseh's Instructions, then you'll have to push it more than the 3 times . . . . but the important thing is that you're getting it started.

I don't even know my own technique, so I'll have to pay attention to what I do in the future . . . . but I think I'm about a 5 time pusher !
 

Last edited by Vermont; 02-10-17 at 02:22 PM. Reason: fixed the math
  #12  
Old 02-10-17, 04:05 PM
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Depending on what type of primer you have and where it is located there could be a few different issues.
Certainly proper priming: PUSH forcefully wait and allow the bulb to refill, then repeat.
In this case, 4 stroke on a snowblower, your primer may be mounted on the front panel and a hose runs from it to the carb. There could be kink, pinch, clog, leak etc. in the hose.
Then there is the fuel bowl that gets pressurized to force gas up the main jet. If the bowl gasket is leaking, the incoming air can escape before reaching the fuel level. Since the fuel has more resistance to being forced up the nozzle, the air will take the path of least resistance and escape.
There are other systems like the one mounted in the air filter housing. The passage to the carb is a plastic channel with a gasket sealing it to the carb. This is also a common problem.

Primers used on two stroke engines are a different animal.
 
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Old 02-10-17, 05:29 PM
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Thanks to all who have answered my plea.

We have more snow heading our way this week end, so i'll have more time
to try your suggestions.

Will be back later
 
  #14  
Old 02-11-17, 09:36 AM
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Smile

There is "joy" at my house'.. After priming the blower 9 times, it started and ran smoothly
without using the electric starter. (hope I didn't jinx myself)

My gratitude to all who answered my plea,especially Vermont and cwbuff.

daswede
 
  #15  
Old 02-11-17, 10:15 AM
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Originally Posted by daswede
". . . There is "joy" at my house'.. After priming the blower 9 times, it started and ran smoothly without using the electric starter. (hope I didn't jinx myself) . . ."
Indeed, as nice as these ultra modern conveniences are, like an Electric Starter, it's nice to know that you can always fall back on an old primitive mechanism like a manual Recoil Starter once in a a while !

Like I think they sometimes say: "Use it . . . . or lose it !"
 
  #16  
Old 02-11-17, 10:59 AM
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So we should go back to kick starting bikes and crank starting cars?
 
  #17  
Old 02-11-17, 01:13 PM
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Originally Posted by cwbuff
". . . So we should go back to kick starting bikes and crank starting cars? . . ."
Certainly not permanently; but if your unit is equipped with Recoil Starter, it seems like it would be good practice to hone those skills necessary to use it.

I once owned a 1960 Triumph TR3 Roadster (now well over 50 years ago) and it came equipped with a hand crank starter which I left in the trunk and never bothered to learn to use until I one time left the headlights on and drained my battery while parked in the Campus parking lot at NorthWestern.

So I had to learn how to start that car by hand in front of an audience . . . . luckily it wasn't -10F; and I did finally succeed, to the applause of the crowd which had gathered to witness a piece of history.

Now I do my learning in private, and when it's not critical. I still know how to use a rotary phone too !
 
  #18  
Old 02-11-17, 02:19 PM
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When I was a kid we had an old Farmall tractor and an old Ford Pickup that were crank started. I still remember how, but I prefer pushing a button.

Actually I'm not sure I remember how to start the Ford. IIRC it was an involved process. I do remember warnings about busted arms though.
 
  #19  
Old 02-11-17, 03:06 PM
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For me, it was critical to remember to have it in Neutral, with the Choke set, and to think to turn the Ignition "ON" . . . . and if it didn't start immediately, turn that Ignition "OFF" so as to not burn the Points !

I'm glad my battery still had the remnants of a charge to pick up the next time . . . . so that I could appreciate the modern marvel of an electric starter.
 
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