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Diesel pump won't start


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02-28-17, 04:41 PM   #1  
Diesel pump won't start

Purchase new diesel pump 5 years ago. Never fueled it never ran it. Filled it with diesel and oil and attempted to start it. It was extremely hard to pull the starter rope when the unloader valve was released. Had to have someone sit on the pump to weigh it down when I pulled it. Never popped. Tried starting fluid. It turned over twice. Starting fluid would not keep it running. Took off starting rope assembly and tried to start with large, 1.5 hp., drill motor. It turned it over many times without starting. Also had someone play with the unloader valve as I turned it over. Tried starting fluid again. No start. Pump brand Amico. Engine: Altima Power Machinery Co. Ltd., 296 cc. (Chinese?)

 
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02-28-17, 05:04 PM   #2  
In the instructions for your pump were there any instructions for priming the fuel system?

 
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03-01-17, 04:05 AM   #3  
Don't use starting fluid on a diesel engine. You'll pop a hole in the top of a piston in quick order. As Dane suggested there is a proper priming sequence you have to go through. On our Cummins engines, we have to pop open #3 injector and crank the engine until fuel spurts out. Closing it down and cranking the engine will allow the engine to start, although roughly until fuel enters the remaining 5 cylinders.

If you use ANYTHING as a primer, use a gasoline moistened cloth over the intake, nothing more volatile. Check for the proper priming sequence and let us know what happens.

 
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03-01-17, 10:18 AM   #4  
Cannot locate owner's manual

This is a one cylinder engine. I do not have an owner's manual.

 
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03-01-17, 11:50 AM   #5  
If you remove the fuel line from the injector will fuel come out? You will probably have to crank it by hand until that happens, then quickly connect it back to the injector. Diesels do not like air embolisms. Once you get the fuel to the injector, try the gas on a rag technique, being careful not to let the engine ingest the rag.

Maybe a picture of the front of the engine would help.

 
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03-01-17, 03:42 PM   #6  
"Single cylinder diesel pump" is not enough information to provide accurate information. What type of pump on what equipment?


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03-01-17, 05:29 PM   #7  
As mentioned, diesels don't like air in the line and that's what you have with a new engine. Crack the injector line open and crank it until all fuel and no bubbles comes out like chandler suggested and I suspect it will fire up.


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03-04-17, 03:26 PM   #8  
Still won't start

Hi,
Removed fuel line to injector. Fuel flows. Removed line from injector. No fuel when turning engine over.

Removed injector head, injector piston moves when turning over. Added fuel to top of piston and to air intake, does not fire.

See start of this thread for description of engine which is on a water pump - make CCs, etc.

See attached photos of engine.

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03-04-17, 03:48 PM   #9  
So no battery? It looks to be a port and vent engine, meaning there is not a valve train. I just don't understand how it will get the first explosion without a glow plug or heat grid. Sorry I can't be of any more help. Hopefully the others will have ideas.

 
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03-04-17, 06:26 PM   #10  
You don't want to remove the line to the injector, just crack it loose a little to allow it to bleed the air out. Once all the air has bled out, tighten it back. Don't loosen it up far, just crack it enough to weep. If you take it loose, air may still be in the line. If none bleeds out, the delivery valve/pump may have problems or the shutoff valve may not be opening far enough to let it fuel. Are you starting it at full throttle?


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03-05-17, 03:16 AM   #11  
Oh, and when it does eventually fire, I hope you have a contingency plan for that drill and socket starter. Unless you are able to disengage it, severe injury could occur. Be careful.

 
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03-05-17, 05:54 AM   #12  
It probably has air in the lines, like Cheese has pointed out. Usually the starting procedure on a first start would be to fill the fuel filter. A lot of diesels have the fuel plunge pump you can manually fill the filter with.

From there do like Cheese advised and crack the line at the injector and spin it until you get regular spurts of fuel. Then tighten the line and it should take off. Diesels without glow plugs and ether go together. That usually gets you going. but that just for starting, not to keep it running if you have fuel problems. If you have a heating element for starting, you wouldn't use the ether.

 
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03-08-17, 01:54 PM   #13  
No fuel flow from injector

The injector does not appear to operate. It is a piston from inside the crank shaft. The piston goes up and down, but fuel does not flow. There is fuel flowing to the injector, by gravity.

There is no other fuel filter on the machine, other than in the fuel tank.

 
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03-08-17, 04:00 PM   #14  
The fuel line goes directly to the injector from the bottom of the tank, then? Not having a filter just before the injector is unusual since the injector has to atomize the fuel. That requires a very small aperture in the injector which can plug easily without finely filtered fuel.

Given fuel is flowing to the injector and it's pressure driven by the piston coming off the crank there's no reason for it not to work. It's a simple take off of an injector pump with the delivery or lift pump replaced by gravity. The lack of filter is a big quiz, though. There just about has to be something before the fuel hits the aperture in the injector to clean it.

You can take out the injector and clean it. There would have to be a return spring in there to work with the drive coming off the crank. The injector must be plugged.

 
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03-15-17, 10:36 AM   #15  
Cleaned the injector. Took all connections apart again and cleaned. Attempted restart, this time priming with WD40. No start. I will stop attempting until I have another brainstorm to try. Thanks for all the help.

 
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03-15-17, 03:52 PM   #16  
WD40 wouldn't start it. Try ether, but don't over do it.

 
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03-15-17, 04:06 PM   #17  
On the front of the engine you have a neoprene line coming from the tank to a fitting, then a metal line fitted just below it and that line goes to the top of the head where the injector is. And you have fuel when you crack the line at the top of the head at the injector?

If that metal line is going to the injector, that setup off the crank is an injector pump, not the injector. You would need to bleed the metal line at the injector on top of the head. When you have fuel spurts at the fitting, tighten the fitting and it'll likely start with the throttle in the on position.

If this isn't the way it's set up, post back.

 
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03-15-17, 10:06 PM   #18  
That's what I'm thinking too marbobj.


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03-16-17, 06:48 PM   #19  
Fuel gets top the pump. Fuel does not get through the pump. It therefore does not get up the metal tube to the injector. The pump piston does go up and down. A valve inside the pump that is stuck?

 
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03-17-17, 03:35 AM   #20  
Make sure the throttle is in the on position. A diesel shutoff is at the pump. Move it to the mid speed position first. You may have the fuel shut off with the throttle.

Disconnect the metal line at the pump where the two lines connect. Then put a cloth over the filler of the tank and blow in it. Don't inhale, just blow to pressurize the tank. You should be getting fuel pumping out the metal line side.

Given the throttle is open and the piston moving, the only thing left is a one way check valve. It may be neoprene, but in a diesel pump it should be a metal check. It would be spring loaded and something there may be stuck. Pressurizing the tank may shake it loose.

That level of diesel engine isn't too hard to get working. Get the pump going first.

 
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03-17-17, 04:07 AM   #21  
I found a manual for you https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...,d.amc&cad=rjt

That has a compression release and some other things to note. Download the manual and that should get you going. The way that thing is setup you shouldn't have to bleed the lines.

Read the manual first.

 
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03-22-17, 03:27 PM   #22  
went through the manual, primed through port at top of cylinder head. Reviewed all of manual instructions. I am still not getting fuel through the injector pump up to the injector. Also, it does not fire even when primed. Still using drill for turning it over. It still binds hard when pulling the starter rope.

 
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03-22-17, 06:03 PM   #23  
Diesels are high compression, the few that I've pull-started were very hard to pull. I would assume things were normal there. A small shot of starting fluid should make it hit a time or two and confirm that. Sounds like your fuel shutoff valve/solenoid/control rack is not working. Do you see a plunger, shaft, or lever that moves when you change it from idle speed to "off"?


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03-25-17, 09:40 AM   #24  
Took the diesel feed tube connection off the engine block. The piston, I think injector pump piston), does go up and down. No fuel however gets beyond this point, to the injector.

 
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03-25-17, 05:49 PM   #25  
On page 12 and 13 of the manual it shows what you do with the engine speed control and the decompression lever and shows just how to pull the rope and why. Have you done all those?

Have you made sure the engine speed control is in the run position? Then pull the rope out slowly and all the way. Then hit and release the decompression lever. Then pull the rope out hard and all the way out.

You have to go through those steps on pages 12 and 13 to get it to start. Putting the drill on it won't start it. I still think you have the fuel shut off with the throttle (speed control)

Take a picture of the piston you mention is going up and down and post it.

 
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03-27-17, 06:41 PM   #26  
Was able to start and run engine 2X on starting fluid after loading the engine head with WD40. It would not sustain on its own. I was not able to start it again even after waiting 20 minutes. Fuel is not getting to the injector.

See photos of the fuel pump cylinder, cam driving cylinder, pump spring and assembly cove in place.

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03-28-17, 03:38 AM   #27  
The piston you mentioned is just the cam rider, which you probably already know. Everything that moves fuel through the pump is above the spring which is there to reload the pump and hold the contact to the cam.

Since it relies solely on the height of the cam to drive the pump it doesn't have a lot of travel in the pump itself. On such a short stroke there's not much draw on each intake stroke so it would take a little time to get the fuel charge loaded for the next stroke when starting. It's what you have with the fuel gravity feed having to come through the filter and no pressure. Once primed and started it would have a constant draw to load fuel. You can compensate a little for that by pressurizing the tank by blowing into it. But do that carefully, don't inhale, use a cloth over the fill hole, and don't use compressed air on the tank.

They specifically say in the starting instructions to pull the starter rope fully out slowly at first. It doesn't explain why, but it may be to give the injector pump time to load the fuel. It does say failure to do so will give you a "no start"

I would suggest manually compressing the spring on the bottom of the pump while you have fuel at the inlet (black line). You may have to place the plunger on a block of wood to force it. See if you get fuel moving through the pump.

If not, do the same thing, but fill the outlet side with fuel to the top of the fitting and see if it rises when you compress the plunger. If it does your pump is working on the pressure side and the transfer through the pump is the problem.

Your problem may very well be the starting procedure you're using. If you know of distributors of that pump/engine in your area, I'm sure they would give you a few pointers on getting it going.

** When you reassemble the piston/cam rider make sure you put a little grease on the bottom to lube the contact with the cam.

 
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