Need a gas powered trimmer

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  #1  
Old 05-12-17, 05:41 AM
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Need a gas powered trimmer

What's a good trimmer, preferably gas powered that's around maybe $150 or so. Are the ones priced lower than $100 not good?

The guy at HD said "We got a good one her for $69!" I think it was some off brand or something.
 
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  #2  
Old 05-12-17, 06:26 AM
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I think its a Homelite for $89. I've been reading more and I think I want a straight handle. They have a nice 4 cycle Ryobi for under 200, but I guess you gotta keep them level and stuff. Might be more of a hassle than a 2 cycle.
 
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Old 05-12-17, 06:38 AM
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Obviously a manufacturer can't offer a string trimmer that you have to hold level. You do not need to operate a 4 cycle differently than a 2 stroke. Mini 4 stroke engines have an oil system that allows them to be operated tilted or sideways without problem. Personally I like 4 stroke trimmers for home level work where fine throttle control is a benefit. I prefer a big 2 stoke when doing heavy brush and weed trimmer where throttle control isn't important and you just need brute power.
 
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Old 05-12-17, 07:14 AM
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Obviously a manufacturer can't offer a string trimmer that you have to hold level. You do not need to operate a 4 cycle differently than a 2 stroke. Mini 4 stroke engines have an oil system that allows them to be operated tilted or sideways without problem. Personally I like 4 stroke trimmers for home level work where fine throttle control is a benefit. I prefer a big 2 stoke when doing heavy brush and weed trimmer where throttle control isn't important and you just need brute power
I've really got a small yard and don't think I'll be making heavy use of the trimmer. I think I may go with the Homelite 2 cycle straight handle. It's only $89, but I'll see.
 
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Old 05-12-17, 09:27 AM
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IMO a straight shaft is easier on your back then a curved shaft. I have a craftsman 4 stroke weedeater that I really like but it is more money. The cheaper weedeaters seem to do ok but have a shorter life and generally aren't worth spending much on repairing them.
 
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Old 05-12-17, 11:14 AM
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2 stroke engines tend to be cheaper. Also, many people find them more finicky and difficult to start. Then there is the mixing gas and oil thing.

4 stroke engines tend to be more expensive and heavier for the same power. There is no need to mix oil into the gas so you can use the same can of gas your push mower uses. 4 strokes also have a (I think) more pleasing sound. They have a lower pitch sound and not the high pitch buzz your used to hearing from a chain saw or leaf blower.
 
  #7  
Old 05-12-17, 01:07 PM
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if you go with the $89 2cycle it will probably call for 50:1 mix, if it does I recommend using 40:1 or 32:1. EPA requirements to the manufacturers has created a problem where the engines are running very lean and aren't getting enough lubrication, your equipment will last a lot longer without scoring the cylinder wall. Have a good one. Geo
 
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Old 05-12-17, 01:44 PM
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I've really got a small yard...
Then why do you "need" a gasoline-powered trimmer? My parents had a 5,000 square foot city lot with no part of it more than fifty feet from the house. My daddy (stupidly, in my opinion) bought a two-cycle trimmer when visiting family in the midwest and once home he could not get that beast to run for love or money. There were NO dealers in the greater Seattle area and he finally had to "send away" for parts, spending almost as much for the parts and shipping as he originally spent for the silly noisemaker. I could bring my Weedeater model 509 (electric) over and do the entire yard in about 45 minutes using a 75 foot extension cord.

Even my previous home on a shy quarter acre was easily trimmed with the electric albeit a bit more cord.

Or are you one of those people that equate noise with power?
 
  #9  
Old 05-12-17, 01:58 PM
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Small yard = 4 stroke or electric, in my opinion. Unless you have other uses for two stroke fuel, you're either going to have to diddle with mixing smaller volumes or end up having bad fuel left over each spring.
 
  #10  
Old 05-12-17, 02:02 PM
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I agree with Furd. I have an el-cheapo Worx that I think cost me $39.95 Lot's of nice features not even found on gas trimmers. Head angle, shaft length, couple of others. I can plug in in my garage and cover the entire front half of the yard, then plug in on the side and cover the back.
I can hang it on the wall at the end of the season and know I can take it down and use it 4 months later. No draining fuel or running it dry, no fogging the cylinder, no fuel stabilizer, no spark plug changes, no de-carbonizing, no carb adjustments, no rotten fuel lines, etc, etc.

You say "a small yard". How far is it from an outside outlet to the furthest point you'd be using it?
 
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Old 05-12-17, 02:46 PM
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I have nothing against an all electric weedeater providing it can all be done with one 100' cord. IMO if it takes more than that - electric isn't an option. While gas can come with it's own set of problems you aren't limited as to where you can use it.
 
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Old 05-12-17, 03:12 PM
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Problems with cheap ones aren't just how long they last, but if they run at all. If all you get is a few starts out of them you're better off spending a little more. I would lean towards the Echo 225GT, but they have less expensive models. I use the 225 GT for a three acre trimming.
 
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Old 05-12-17, 07:24 PM
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About the only trimmer I recommend to anyone anymore is the echo srm225 or better. Too much money is wasted on $75 to $150 trimmers from box stores that don't last, don't perform well, aren't always easy starting, etc... I know lots of people will chime in with how their 20 year old homelite or ryobi still works, and that's fine but not the norm. Pay now or pay later is pretty much how this goes. If I was trying to get by the cheapest, I'd go to walmart and buy the $60 special, use it till it quits, toss it and get another. Spending more doesn't get you any appreciable quality upgrades until you get into the entry level echos. It can get you features though, like flimsy quick change attachments and so called EZ start starting systems and all that marketing hype, which amounts to a $60 trimmer with features and marketing gizmos that make the consumer think it's worth $150.
 
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Old 05-13-17, 02:33 AM
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To echo (get it? Echo?) what several others have said, a decent gas trimmer starts about $175 or so. Echo currently has the best user reviews I believe.

Stihl used to be the cream of the crop, with Echo a close second. Now, Stihl seems to have put less focus on consumer grade tools.

For items such as this, I always used to look at what I saw on the side of landscapers trucks and trailers. It was pretty much Stihl and Echo everywhere you looked, with a few Husqvarnas thrown in. Since we don't have a lot of grass out here, most of what I see now are battery electric models.
 
  #15  
Old 05-13-17, 09:49 PM
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What about a cordless? I really don't have much trimming, save for my beard. lol
 
  #16  
Old 05-14-17, 12:46 AM
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You'll pay more unless you buy one compatible with cordless tools you have now. They are normally less powerful than a corded tool of the same size and price.

Once again, you don't answer questions asked. How big is the yard? How far from the furthest point to the nearest outlet.

If you don't really want help and keep going off on tangents, soon you won't be getting answers on other issues.
 
  #17  
Old 05-15-17, 06:14 AM
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Once again, you don't answer questions asked. How big is the yard? How far from the furthest point to the nearest outlet.

If you don't really want help and keep going off on tangents, soon you won't be getting answers on other issues.
I don't know how big my yard is, but it's rather small. I don't even know the furthest point to the outlet. I've got a 100 ft cord though and I think it'll reach.

So what's a good corded model for under $100? Maybe $150?
 
  #18  
Old 05-16-17, 06:40 AM
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Ok guys. I was going to get the corded model and I have a 100 foot cord, but then there's dragging the cord around, plugging it in, etc.

I think I'm going to go with a 4 cycle here. How this?

Ryobi 4-Cycle 30cc Attachment Capable Straight Shaft Gas Trimmer-RY4CSS - The Home Depot
 
  #19  
Old 05-16-17, 10:11 AM
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Scratch that! On 3rd thought, I think I will go with the corded after all. Less hassle really for my needs.
 
  #20  
Old 05-18-17, 03:49 AM
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I ended up going with a Black n Decker for I think $50 if I remember correctly. I haven't even unboxed it yet, but that's what I got. Hopefully it'll work ok.
 
  #21  
Old 05-18-17, 05:20 AM
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My first weedeater was a low priced electric one. It worked well although because it used a small gauge the string wore quickly. I think I gave it away once I moved to bigger property and needed gas.
 
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