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Chainsaw chain (Homelite 14" model 3514c) keeps slipping off the bar


MichaelChang's Avatar
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05-13-17, 07:20 PM   #1  
Chainsaw chain (Homelite 14" model 3514c) keeps slipping off the bar

I was cutting into a pile of junk and the chain slipped off the bar. I readjusted it no problem.
It happened again after a while, this time the chain didn't flow as freely through the bar.
A couple more times, it got harder and harder to readjust so I laid a piece of wood flat across sawhorses, easiest thing to cut, nothing to jar the chain off the bar, it happened again.
At this point, even if I'm able to get the chain back on the bar (harder each time), it comes off right away.
: (

 
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cheese's Avatar
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05-13-17, 11:19 PM   #2  
Bent bar or damage to the track in the bar.


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05-13-17, 11:36 PM   #3  
Did you check your bar oil level before starting? Running it dry will eat up a bar or chain in short order.


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05-14-17, 03:35 AM   #4  
Are you sure the chain is adjusted properly on the sprocket? There is a slot and screw that help hold it all in place.


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05-14-17, 05:29 AM   #5  
I would agree with Cheese. It's likely a crimped track or bent bar. Just go around the bar with a flat screwdriver, find the crimp and open it up.

 
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05-14-17, 06:31 PM   #6  
Probably was the bar and/or chain.
I always use the bar/chain oil and the additive for the gas.
Tried clearing the track on the bar, still no joy.
I bought a new bar and chain set and noticed when I was installing it that the adjuster pin (circled) wasn't far up enough.
I think what happened was two things:
a) particles go into the bar track.
b) the vibration moved the adjuster pin back causing too much slack in the chain making it easier to fall off.

With the new bar and chain, I've never seen the chain move so fast. Thanks everyone

 
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05-15-17, 05:00 AM   #7  
Adjuster Pin

Make sure the adjuster pin is engaged in the bar rather than riding on the flat surface of the bar.

 
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05-15-17, 05:03 AM   #8  
That was my thought as to why the original chain didn't stay in place although I probably didn't explain it as well


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05-17-17, 05:58 AM   #9  
The new chain slipped off the blade after a few cuts.
I put the blade back on with the adjuster pin in the hole, the chain was loose so I tightened up the adjuster pin to bring the bar out therefore taking up the excessive slack on the chain.
The chainsaw started smoking and the chain was moving but it wasn't cutting anything more than 1/4" then it slipped off the bar again.
This time I was unable to manually move the chain through the bar, like I'm usually able to do.
I believe the problem is that the groove in the bar collects particles which slows the chains' movement which makes it jump off the bar.
The flathead screwdriver on the end of the chainsaw tool doesn't fit deep enough into the bars' groove.
Any better object that you know of to slide deep through the bars' groove to ensure it's clear?

 
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05-17-17, 11:18 AM   #10  
It's not the particles you're describing. With the oiler working and a new bar and chain it's how you're tightening the chain.

How are you doing that?

 
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05-17-17, 11:20 AM   #11  
Make sure the bar is the problem....take the bar off, hold it vertical by the tip and put the chain on it...feel around the bar seeing if the chain is tight in the groove at any one point.


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05-17-17, 11:25 AM   #12  
The chain doesn't fit nicely into the bar groove in certain areas (it did when I first bought it only a handful of cuts before), I can force the chain into the groove but then the motor has to work harder to move it through

 
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05-17-17, 11:52 AM   #13  
It sounds like you're pinching the bar in your cuts. This is going to sound bad, but the only way to know is to ask, so...Have you had any instruction on how to use a chainsaw? If not, I suggest watching a video or two and doing some reading, there are techniques and things you do an not do for safety's sake and the saw's.


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05-17-17, 11:52 AM   #14  
might try a smaller screw driver to spread the bar out but shouldn't need much tweaking for the chain to fit.
when you reinstall the bar and chain would check the sprocket to ensure its aligned with the bar and retighten the chain if you grab the chain in the middle of the bar and pull the chain away from the bar there should be a little slack but not enough to pull the chain links out of the bar if you can pull them out of the bar guide its to loose and will likely come off again, when you have it tensioned correctly it often helps to lift up on the tip of the bar while tightening the bar nuts.

 
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05-17-17, 12:29 PM   #15  
I'm definitely pinching the bar, I'll clear it out and use the proper 3-cut technique

 
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