lawn tractor transaxle lube

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-26-18, 05:05 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 2,079
Received 65 Votes on 60 Posts
lawn tractor transaxle lube

Yesterday I dragged the roller around a bit with the old Motomower I restored for the wife, backed it in the shop, and this morning I have small puddles under both rear axle seals. I replaced the seals a couple month ago, and having no manual I filled the case with 80/90 gear lube, just like I have used it in it for years. But, as I recall, it has seeped for years too. Doing a little more looking this morning, I see where Cheese suggested 00 grease to someone a few years back so wondering if maybe I want to try that. Is 00 grease pourable? And is it likely better for this application, mainly meaning less likely to seep past the seals? Or is there something else I should look at?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-26-18, 10:20 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Ct.,USA
Posts: 1,330
Received 45 Votes on 39 Posts
Seals are used to prevent liquid leaking from one side to the other. I don’t think your tractor was designed to use grease. It could be you overfilled the xmission with oil. If no vent, pressure due to overfilling could be pushing the oil out. Also, a worn or damaged axle (in the area of the oil seal) or defective seal could be causes of leakage. Have you checked the web for a manual?
 
  #3  
Old 08-26-18, 12:16 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 2,079
Received 65 Votes on 60 Posts
I have looked for a manual online, but to no avail. I think that I know where it vents, but need to look at that again, and was thinking that it won't hurt anything it I add one where the overflow port is. No dipstick, etc., but one plug that is obviously the fill and a second flat head screw below and to the side of it which I always figured was where you brought the oil up to. I replaced the sleeve bearings on one side and cleaned the shaft up while I was at it, but both sides are leaking a little so am going to pull both sides apart, see if those new bearings are shot and replace those again if I need to along with the other side. I had to order 6 bearings in order to get the two I thought I needed originally, so at least I don't have to buy any more. Just a matter of making sure I get the any burrs worked out of the axles shafts.
 
  #4  
Old 08-26-18, 01:12 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: North East Kingdom of Vermont
Posts: 2,533
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Well, here's a parts breakdown of one of those transmssions:
 

Last edited by Vermont; 08-26-18 at 01:51 PM.
  #5  
Old 08-26-18, 01:32 PM
cheese's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 17,260
Received 22 Votes on 19 Posts
Yeah I would try to fix the problem and keep the gear oil in. I remember that post and the "00" grease does okay in a clamshell type transmission like what is in most riding mowers these days because they are shallow and the gears are all on the same plane. If it was one of those deals where you said you just want to slow down the leak and use it until it quits, then the "00" grease might be a good option.
 
  #6  
Old 08-27-18, 05:41 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 2,079
Received 65 Votes on 60 Posts
Thank you Vermont, but no link appeared. And thank you Cheese. Was thinking later that that 00 grease may be for the newer mowers that you mentioned, and am pretty sure than that I know what it is. Not a lot of experience with it as I donít have anything that uses it, but have run into it and neighbors mowers and like that. If itís what Iím thinking, itís a kind of off white/gray sticky substance, maybe closer to the consistency of a really thick syrup. Well, anyway, weíll give it a try, check out the bearings and replace if needed, put some new seals in it, refill it with gear lube, and hope for the best. Thank you again.
 
  #7  
Old 08-27-18, 05:51 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: North East Kingdom of Vermont
Posts: 2,533
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Sorry; I had it as an attachment; but somehow the exhibit was made illegal because of the file trailer ?

Here's a link to the discussion of 1/31/2015 where both the Schematic and a corresponding Parts List are presented:

Moto Mower tractor 1966 model 6064 - Compact Utility and Farm Tractor Forum - GTtalk

Hopefully, these match (or are close) to the machine you have !
 
  #8  
Old 08-27-18, 06:58 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 2,079
Received 65 Votes on 60 Posts
Thank you, Vermont. I will print that and put it in my file this evening. The one I have is similar to ones pictured in that thread, but mine has a more rounded hood, sort of resembles a scaled down 8N so pretty cool. The transaxle looks pretty much identical. My folks were pretty good about holding onto and appropriately filing manuals, but dad worked for a Dura owned sister company of Motomower at the time, and they offered these as straight employee purchases, not through dealers, so it came with no badging other than a model and serial number tag, and probably no manuals as they would have most likely been added by the distributors. Seems like I figured at some point that Porter Cable, either Sears or Wards, and one or two others sold them. Anyway, thank you again.
 
  #9  
Old 08-27-18, 08:02 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: North East Kingdom of Vermont
Posts: 2,533
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Transmission Oil or Grease has been a point of curiosity with me.

I currently have two riding mowers of different makes; but they both have Tecumseh/Peerless/Lauson Transmissions, One is a Three Speed H Pattern and other is a 5 Speed continuous cluster.

I've re-built both of them within the past few years and was surprised that they use such different lubricants.

The Three Speed uses 90-100 Weight Gear Oil; maybe because its gear shafts are arranged over and under a bit more than the 5 speed. And the 3 Speed has BOTH a drain plug and a fill port mid way up the casing; and i've chana couple grease seals on it over the past few decades.

In contrast, the 5 Speed is more along the lines of the "clamshell" design that you described, with all shafts being at the same level, and it uses real thick grease,most like axle grease or what you'd use with a grease gun. This transmission's case has no drain or fill port, and was thought to have been permanently greased at the factory. The grease seals on the axles on this one don't have to do much work. When taken apart, the gears were embedded in thick grease, and it's almost impossible to see the wear or problem areas until the whole thing is cleaned.

Maybe the presence or absence of a drain plug is a fairly reliable telltale indicator of what kind of lubricant is supposed to be used ?
 
  #10  
Old 08-27-18, 08:32 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 2,079
Received 65 Votes on 60 Posts
Thatís along the line of what Iím picking up from Cheeseís comments too. Older serviceable ones using gear line and newer maybe not so serviceable ones using grease.
 
  #11  
Old 08-27-18, 12:20 PM
cheese's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 17,260
Received 22 Votes on 19 Posts
Yes, that's pretty much the case. Some of the newer clamshell types do have gear oil but most have the "00" grease. It's not as thick as bearing or "grease gun" grease, as it will settle to the bottom when stationary for a while.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: