Cordless Electric Lawn Mower, Kobalt 40-volt

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  #1  
Old 04-24-19, 06:58 AM
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Cordless Electric Lawn Mower, Kobalt 40-volt

Hello:
I'm thinking of purchasing 'Kobalt 40-volt Brushless Lithium lon 20-in Cordless Electric Lawn Mower.' The current Lawn Mower is 'Electric, '120V, 13A' Lawn Mower' which does the job, however I hate the extension-cord tangling-up once awhile when cutting the yard which is not large.

I have no idea whether '40-volt Brushless Lithium lon 20-in Cordless Electric(Battery)' is about as same power as '120V, 13A Electric Lawn Mower.'

Any inputs on this regard would be truly appreciated.

Thanks,
 
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Old 04-24-19, 09:34 AM
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Search the web. There are several reviews/comparisons out there about lawn mowers.

The big thing is to determine how long you need the mower to run and at what load. The cordless I've used are able to keep up with corded models power wise at least initially. The real test is how long they can keep up that power.

How you care for your lawn can also have a big affect on how long a cordless will run. If you cut your grass regularly, before it gets tall, the mower has an easier job and the battery will last longer. If you wait and let it get really thick and decide to cut when the grass is wet it will burn through a battery much quicker.
 
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Old 04-24-19, 10:00 AM
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Thanks for the response.
We, the family cut the lawn regularly. The yard is not big one, then the cordless might do the job as the electric one.
There are also 80V which appears to me more power, however the price is close to $500 for which I'm not willing to pay because the yard, back and front is not big.

Only concern is 'power.' The current one may not be a powerful one, but it's enough for our yard which be cut within one hour. Then I'm looking for 'similar' with cordless. It's OK as long as the cordless is NOT too weak in comparison to electric one.
 
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Old 04-24-19, 11:37 AM
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An hour is pushing the limit of many cordless so I'd research carefully. If the battery comes up short you'll need to buy a second, quite expensive battery or take a charging break and maybe finish the lawn the next day. Personally I'd look for a mower spec'd to run 150% longer than needed to mow the lawn. That will allow some extra margin for when the lawn is thicker and batteries loose their capacity with age so the extra capacity will allow it to be useful for a few years longer.
 
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Old 04-24-19, 02:51 PM
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I have a 60v cordless which I use as a trimmer mower (we live on some acreage). If I lived in town and a push mower was all I needed, I don't think I'd go electric just yet. The batteries only last as long as advertised if the motor is in light duty, which means you're cutting your grass pretty often...something I'm not real good at. As a trimmer mower, it's great.
 
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Old 04-24-19, 05:11 PM
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Lets step back and ask why you want a cordless electric? Yes, you want to get rid of the cord but gas is the original reliable, inexpensive cordless. So, you need a compelling reason to pay more for something that can marginally accomplish the job. You also need to consider the life of the battery. My gas push mower is over 10 years old and still going strong. I don't have any cordless tools that old still on their original battery.
 
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Old 04-24-19, 06:38 PM
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Thanks again, ...
The gas-mower we had died only four and a half years' use although I paid close to $400. The original one purchased from Sears lasted almost 20 years.
As knowing the above, we, a kind started to settle 'Cordless,' since we prefer it easy to start and use. Also, we both have mild form of Arthritis, both fingers and spine-area which the specialist ruled out 'age-related.'
The current one, 'Electric Lawn mower' is very easy to use, ... particularly we do not need to hassle 'starting' by pulling a string several times. I think that I'm going for 40V, not 60V nor 80V. I will purchase 'back-up battery,' if an right one for both of us.
 
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Old 04-24-19, 07:48 PM
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My father's Toro gas mower has a key start and the self propulsion system matches whatever speed he walks. He's 83.
 
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Old 04-24-19, 10:45 PM
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I'd be surprised if you get much more than 4 years out of a rechargeable mower. What happened to the last gas mower in 4 years? If it just needed a repair after 4 years, that's not bad. Spark plug or air filter, dirty carb...? You can usually get 10-20 years out of a gas mower. I believe I'd want an electric start self propelled mower in your situation.
 
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Old 04-25-19, 02:59 AM
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In my opinion you are asking the wrong question; you should be asking if a battery-operated mower will satisfactorily mow YOUR lawn given the size of the yard, the size (NOT voltage) of the mower and on YOUR normal schedule of mowing frequency.

As for power, it is simply the voltage and amperage used by the mower's motor. Generally speaking as battery voltage goes up the amperage of the motor goes down. With a "push" (non-power driven) motor the only requirement is to be able to turn the blade and that is dependent upon the size of the blade and the density of the grass.

I've been using both corded and battery mowers for more than thirty years and I have not met ANY mower that won't mow an average-sized residential-sized lot in a satisfactory manner. The voltage is all but irrelevant because the higher the voltage the smaller the motor. My 24 volt (battery) mowers have been no different than my 120 volt (corded) mowers. There are a LOT of people that will try to tell you that higher voltages mean more power but it is NOT necessarily true. Where it MIGHT be true is if the higher voltage machine also has a bigger (diameter) blade

Electric motors have less maintenance than gasoline-powered motors; no oil to check or change, no gasoline to store...and go bad, no spark plug to go bad but only sharpen (or have sharpened) the blade once or twice a year and be done with it. My first battery mower, using old technology lead/acid batteries, had the batteries last for seventeen years before they needed to be replaced. Contrast that with my fried who had a popular Japanese brand mower that he had in the shop every year for a "tune-up" that cost close to $100.

It seems to me that the vast majority of people down rate ANYTHING electrical because it makes significantly less noise. Heck, it can't possibly have enough power if it doesn't make a lot of noise, everyone KNOWS that to be true.

Personally, I wouldn't have a gasoline mower unless I had several acres that needed mowing on a weekly basis.
 
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Old 04-25-19, 06:33 AM
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My cordless 40v mower will run 15 min on a charge. Be aware that mine is made as a mulching mower with no option to exhaust clippings. I thought that was strange. If you need an hour then plan on buying extra batteries!
 
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Old 04-25-19, 08:08 AM
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The 40v models are usually the cheapest.
You don't have to spend $500 to get the best. Most of those are self propelled which AFAIC, isn't necessary. That premium usually cost $100 and adds weight and cuts run time. lastly, it's one more thing to go wrong.

AFA why cordless/battery over gas? Easy; they don't pollute, no mess, little noise. Gas woulde a dinosaur if it wasn't for the petroleum industries stranglehold of 'green energy!
 
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Old 04-25-19, 09:07 AM
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Good point airmark on the mulching feature - mine has that too (although I can convert to side discharge if needed) and it definitely pulls harder...especially in tall grass. I could surely get better battery life without mulching.
 
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Old 04-26-19, 12:36 AM
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Of the dozen or more that I looked into, they all are 3 in 1's.
Mulching (the only way I have ever used mine), side & rear bagging.

BTW, my cordless electric 1st mower is over 17 years old now, the reason I'm looking for a replacement. I never had any intention of ever buying a dirty, gas guzzling, pouting internal combustion engine mower.
I live where lot size is measured in feet, not acres.
 
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Old 04-26-19, 11:09 PM
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That gas engine isn't as bad in comparison as you think when you find out what happens to the Earth in the process of making that mower and the plastic surrounding it and obtaining the lithium for the batteries and making the power required to charge the battery. Neither are environmentally friendly. I see you're in NY, and I guess some of those yards up there could be cut with scissors, so I suppose one could last a long time there. Around my area, a small yard is 1/2 acre and it wouldn't last long here.
 
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Old 04-27-19, 12:03 AM
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Being in NYS doesn't mean NYC and no, using a "scissors" even there, literally wouldn't cut it. In WNY, 2nd ring suburban sprawl 'lot's are the size of yours as you stated and larger.
If my lot was that small, I wouldn't bother buying a power mower of any kind. Reel mowers are still made. FWIW, mine is around 3500 sq. ft. front & back.

AFA the materials used in manufacturing, what, gas mowers don't have plastics? The mowers I looked at all have steel decks even thou there are plastic parts including the cases of the packs themselves, but they like all battery packs can get recycled, unlike the 'fuel' old school noisey, dirty, messy gas engines.
 
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Old 04-27-19, 12:08 AM
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One of the selling points of cordless electric mowers are the associated other outdoor tools, namely string trimmers that use the same packs. Most tools have the options of just buying the 'tool' and sharing the charger & pack between them.

I was looking at a few other threads and saw your well typed getting ready for spring
'sticky' and I had to chuckle, reading all the steps to do dealing with gas engines and glad I don't have to do any of that.
Unfortunately the same can't be said with my snow thrower, but that doesn't see the hours my lawn mower sees and isn't as old.
 

Last edited by videobruce; 04-27-19 at 12:24 AM.
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