Where do you add a fuel shutoff valve in a gas line of a small engine?

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Old 07-30-19, 04:25 PM
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Where do you add a fuel shutoff valve in a gas line of a small engine?

I'm adding a shutoff valve to the engine on my lawn tractor.

What's conventional wisdom say for where the shut off goes relative to the gas filter? valve closer to engine or closer to gas tank compared to filter?

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Old 07-30-19, 04:40 PM
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Both will work but after the filter will also stop all the fuel lift in the filter from draining out.
Makes me wonder why are you having to do this?
Just guessing but is there fuel leaking out after the engines shut off?
If so you have a float issue, it's not shutting the fuel off after you shut the engine off.
 
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Old 07-31-19, 05:19 AM
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As Joe said, either way will work, and a valve is usually not essential so if you're adding it because of an issue at the carburetor you're better off going after the needle, seat, and float. But I happen to like having a valve myself, so have added them to equipment that didn't come with one, and, when it works, prefer them as close to the tank as possible, preferably right in the outlet. This makes it easiest to service the filter or lines, and if I need the tank out of the way to get to something else I can close the valve, disconnect the line, and lift the tank out without having to siphon it. That's my preference, but it's going to depend on how everything is configured.
 
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Old 07-31-19, 05:43 AM
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In my experience adding a fuel valve to a small engine depends upon where it will fit. Most cases you are limited by room. Preferable closest to the tank outlet. I've learned to purge the engine and carb of all fuel when not in use by shutting off the fuel supply and let engine die for lack of fuel and adding choke to be sure carb bowl empties.
 
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Old 07-31-19, 06:38 AM
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I was changing the fuel filter (how often do you do that for your equipment), I bought a piece of fuel hose that came with a shutoff valve. so figured I'd put that in there.

And remembering how my dad would run our snow blower dry in the spring (and actually start it up in the summer a couple times). That snow blower started up fine after several years of sitting idle. Meanwhile, a portable generator that sat idle for less than a year is gummed up..

I was thinking - before the filter will take longer for the engine to run out of fuel. And how well does a dried out filter work when you open the valve again? But that will make it easier to change the fuel filter.

So I could see both answers having pros / cons. after the filter doesn't help for changing the filter but the engine stops quicker and the filter stays wet.
 
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Old 07-31-19, 06:45 AM
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Sorry, I posted before seeing Pedro's and Norm's replies. So I'll go with the valve near the tank. But when you run the engine dry for the end of the season, etc.... the paper in the filter, soaked with gas and then dries out.... that doesn't cause it to gum up / not pass fuel when it gets wet months later?
 
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Old 07-31-19, 08:49 AM
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My generator, riding lawn mower and snow blower don't even use a filter. Not so sure on small engines if it's really necessary. If you think you need to filter the fuel use a cheese cloth over the fill when filling tank. The biggest problem I have is in the winter when filling the snowblower tank, not to get snow or water into the tank. That's were an occasional few ounces of dry gas help.
 
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