Snowblower help

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Old 10-20-20, 09:15 PM
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Snowblower help

I purchased a Cub Cadet 2X snowblower last Fall. Used it maybe 10-12 times last Winter. Went to start it up tonight and no go via electric start or pull. I left gasoline in it after last Winter (we all know how that goes). I siphoned it out, completely drained it and replaced the spark plug with the gap recommended in the manual. Still no start. I am at a complete loss because this machine has so little time on it. Ant advice? Tips?
 
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Old 10-20-20, 10:06 PM
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It doesn't matter how new the item is.
Gas has been allowed to evaporate for almost a year.
The gas has congealed inside the carb. It will require it to be taken apart and fully cleaned.
 
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Old 10-21-20, 05:37 AM
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You might try a shot of starting fluid. If you use it just use a quick spray or two. If the engine doesn't fire you may have a different problem.

I leave gas overwinter in my lawn tractor, generator and snow blower. I've not had a carburator problem.
 
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Old 10-21-20, 06:23 AM
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Try this. Remove carb and using compressed air from an air compressor not a can shoot all the orifices. It's not as good or reliable as a complete teardown but I've been lucky on several occasions.

And never leave gas in any of your equipment. CW is lucky and he most likely fills the tank to the brim with stabilizer added and makes sure its' into the carb as well. I'm of the school to empty completely. I find it easier and more reliable.
 
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Old 10-21-20, 07:21 AM
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I do fill the tanks and I add stabilizer and then I run the engine long enough to get the stabilized fuel through the fuel system. I've been doing that for many years. I have never had a starting problem related to fuel. I empty all my small stuff, chain saw, trimmers, push mower etc. But draining fuel out of larger tanks is a PITA.
 
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Old 10-21-20, 07:26 AM
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That makes sense. This is my first year owning a snowblower and I'll be sure to drain all of the gas at the end of next winter. Although I'm pretty handy, I'm not super familiar with small engines. For someone who has all the tools required and has patience, is this a relatively simple DIY procedure? I'm assuming there are plenty of videos to follow along with online?
 
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Old 10-21-20, 07:43 AM
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Most snow blowers have a fuel shutoff valve. At end of season, shut the fuel valve and run the unit until it dies. That will empty the carb. Then just undo the hose connection to the fuel tank and run the gas out into a jar or whatever. You can throw that into you car.

As far as removing the carb for cleaning, take pictures before and as you disassemble it from the unit. Try the compressed air idea first and re-assemble. If it fires up you're golden. If not, remove and be prepared for total teardown of the carb for cleaning. Or you might bring it to a small engine repair shop and they can do it for you.
 
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Old 10-21-20, 07:46 AM
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Before doing anything check that the key is pushed in properly.
If it has a fuel shut off make sure it is turned to on.
Then check if you have spark.
If yes then try starter fluid or spray some gas into the carb intake or spark plug hole.


 
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Old 10-21-20, 07:50 AM
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I have tried both keys. There is no fuel shut off on my model. I do have spark and even changed the spark plug with the appropriate gap recommended for my model. And yes, siphoning gas after the fact is a PITA which is why I will never allow this to happen again. 😀
 
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Old 10-21-20, 07:58 AM
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In that case do what CW does or install shut off valve
 
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Old 10-21-20, 11:18 AM
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Norm - In pre ethanol days it was not unusual for me to leave my car for 3 or 4 months during deployments. Just sitting in a base parking lot. I never had a gas problem but I always carried jumper cables.

Now with E10 gas I use Sta Bil. My riding lawn mower will probably sit for 5-6 months with a full tank and I expect it to start just fine. My last one did for 12 years. I keep the generator tank full although I run the generator for a half hour every quarter. It has a fuel shut off and I run it dry. My new Cub Cadet Snow Blower does not have a fuel shut off and I can't even find a fuel line to drain from. I can't see the fuel filter either it's probably under the engine shroud somewhere. .
 
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Old 10-21-20, 11:37 AM
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CW - You are correct our machines do not have a fuel valve. I must have been thinking of my old unit. Apparently I just run out the gas or if full enough I siphon it out then run it dry.

I run my generator once week and that does have a shut off valve. I run it for five or ten minutes and shut the valve and walk away.
 
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