Ariens snow blower: start after sitting

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Old 10-25-20, 10:14 PM
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Ariens snow blower: start after sitting

I have owned my Ariens 24 inch snow blower for a couple of years, and it has been always difficult to start it for the first use of each year. I checked the manual and it seemed I did nothing wrong. I have to get it plugged in, and need to press that electric start button for a while, and may need to try that a couple of times to get it started. According to the manual, I shouldn't press that start button for too long time. I am wondering if there was anything wrong, and if there is anything else I can do to start it for the first use of this year.

Thank you very much!
 
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Old 10-26-20, 12:12 AM
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So the real question is what did you do to prep the machine at the end of the season last year.

Use fuel stabilizer, some carb oil fog all contribute to an easier starting.

A shot of starter fluid will help get it going also!
 
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Old 10-26-20, 05:21 AM
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It all depends on how you store for the off season.
You have two methods.
1. empty the tank completely including the carb by letting it run out and stall.
2. Fill the tank completely with non-ethanol fuel and stabilizer and make sure the carb is also filled.

I prefer the 1st method and always using fresh fuel. What I suggest you do now if and when you get it started, pour in a can of carb cleaner. Hopefully that will clean out any gum and varnish build up. If you still have trouble then remove carb and do a deep clean or take it to a shop for cleaning.
 
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Old 10-26-20, 07:52 AM
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Thanks for all the tips. I haven't paid so much attention to the maintenance of the blower. Didn't know there were start fluid, and non-ethanol fuel either. I guess I can do a better job to store the blower for next summer.

Thanks.
 
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Old 10-27-20, 05:38 AM
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Hi, once you get it started with the starter, how does it run? check the condition of the spark plug, cheap enough to put in a new one , I have the same issue, but once itís starts it runs fine, I have always filled the gas tank and added fuel stabilizer at the end of the season.
Geo
 
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Old 10-27-20, 07:55 AM
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There's no need to purchase starter fluid when it has what it needs to run there in the gas tank. If it won't fire and try to tun with a half teaspoon of gasoline put in the carburetor throat there's a problem other than the carburetor.
 
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Old 10-27-20, 08:26 AM
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There's no need to purchase starter fluid when it has what it needs to run there in the gas tank
But if you have krap in the tank starter fluid is an easy way to get it started, it's not a solution to the problem itself but it does verify that the spark system is working.
 
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Old 10-27-20, 08:39 AM
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Marq is correct. If you can get the engine to run for a few seconds by squirting gas into the sparkplug cylinder or the carb, then you know the engine is working and the fuel delivery is the problem in almost all cases.
 
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Old 10-27-20, 09:05 AM
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Sure, but ya gotta be smart nuff to avoid that Crap in the bottom of the tank that you allowed in there.
 

Last edited by SandburRanch; 10-27-20 at 09:36 AM.
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Old 10-27-20, 09:39 AM
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Yea but that's why you have fuel filter before it goes into the carb. In fact changing the fuel filter should be the OP's next step. Besides I find that dirt or grime is basically non existent in wintertime use. But getting snow or ice is the problem. That's when a bit of dry gas comes in handy.
The dirt and grime is a bigger problem on the lawn mower during summer.
 
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Old 10-27-20, 12:01 PM
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I prefer the crud never reaching the tank.

 
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Old 10-27-20, 02:08 PM
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In my neighborhood, the first weekend in the spring and first snowfall in the winter, usually begins with the sound of a lot of small engine recoil starters being pulled with no engines firing, and cursing. Since I am an all around great guy,usually in my garage with the door open, and somewhat familiar with engines, the offending machine and frustrated owner are soon over here. A shot of starting fluid in the right spot usually gets past whatever dried up or got stuck in the carb of the offending machine, and everyone is happy. Sometimes it takes a little more than that but for the most part 95% of the time it works.
 
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