toro Deck Deflector Springs

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Old 01-18-21, 09:30 PM
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toro Deck Deflector Springs

I have a Toro HMR 1600 Model 55620 with a 44" cutting deck (55660). This deck has a deflector shield that needs two torsion springs ((40-6230) installed on the hinges that support it. I see on the parts diagram that the short hooked end of the spring hooks onto the support bar that is bolted to the deck. The other end of the spring with a long straight end does not appear to have any obvious spot to be placed. Are these springs supposed to keep the deflector in the lowered position, or to help the operator raise the deflector? These springs are going to need a lot of pressure to preload them for any reason. If I install them the easy way, they don't appear to affect anything involving the deflector.
 
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Old 01-19-21, 02:42 AM
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I cannot imagine anything other than the purpose of the springs being to hold the deflector in the lowered position, so am quite certain you will find that the second end is supposed to ride against the top edge, not under it. Different machine, but that's how the deflector on my almost 30 year old Toro is, and how another one was when I put a deflector back on a friends mower a year or two ago after he took it off and couldn't figure how it was supposed to be. It's a little tricky getting it in there as I recall, especially for something that looks so simple at first glance, but, like you said, if you do it the other way it doesn't do anything. Yes, it might seem excessively tight, but it's intended to keep the deflector in the down, or "safe" position, and remember that the length of it is a lever so you'll be able to raise it if you need to for maintenance.
 
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Old 01-19-21, 05:43 AM
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The springs hold the deflector chute in the down/lowered position. Twisting the torsion spring and getting everything in position can make you wish you had three or four hands so a helper can make it a lot easier.
 
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Old 01-19-21, 09:34 AM
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Thanks guys, I was afraid you were going to say that, but I was also looking for a video showing me how to do it with just two hands lol Seems weird to engineer something that has to work with two spikes sticking up (the long spring ends) but sometimes it is what it is I guess. Watch for me on the Worlds funniest home videos !
 
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Old 01-19-21, 12:42 PM
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Correct, it holds the deflector down. It's not hard to do, you just have to get it all in position and start sliding the pin in and then twist the spring over at the last bit before it is held down too far to do it. It's the same as putting that spring on your float in that zenith carbureotr.
 
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Old 01-19-21, 04:49 PM
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I can reposition the springs now so they can be coiled to have the spring legs putting down pressure on the grass deflector without being visible and not a danger to anyone. I have removed the entire deflector, hinge, springs and bracket so I can clamp everything so nothing moves unless I want it to, (spring wise) I should be able to bolt it back on the deck as a complete spring loaded assembly. Thanks for all the replies!
 
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Old 01-20-21, 05:44 PM
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Well I can scrap the idea of putting this all together as an assembly and then bolting it to the deck. With all the hardware in place, you cannot access the the carriaige bolts to get the nuts started to re fasten the assembly to the deck itself. The trick is to get get the long leg of the spring in its designed internal resting place, get the long hinge bolt started from that end of the hinge and spring (with the long spike on it, not the short hooked one.) Once the bolt is inserted, you can bend the spring with the bolt until you can line it up with the other hole and get the nut started on it. You can then catch the hooked end with a screw driver and pry it up so it will snap over the angle iron bar that the hinge is made of. Tighten everything up and you have all the down pressure on the deflector that Toro designed for it. (with no spring ends sticking up to nail you) Cheese was right again, and so was everybody else.lol
 
 

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