Case 1840 skid loader issue


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Old 02-14-21, 09:09 AM
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Case 1840 skid loader issue

Im not sure if these are covered on here, but i gotta try.
at work we have an 1840 Case Uni Loader. I was running it during the last snowfall, for alost 2 hours , no issues, I brought it down to idle for about 2-3 minutes, and it just shut off instantly, no sputters, just stopped. cranks fine, but wont fire up now.
my first thought was fuel, since the guage is wacky,. put 5 gal in right away, still no fire.
I am NOT a guy who knows about this thing, I have replace all Hydor hoses,. and have also pulled the tandem drive pump to repair the output shaft and what looks like a flywheel that the shaft goes through.... anyway...
fuel issues? I made sure there is fuel,.. I opened the drain on the bottom of the fuel filter, drained it, looked like maybe a tiny bit of water could have been in there... but not much, worked the primer til it felt like it did some good,.. still no fire..... opened the drain again, just to make sure it put fuel into the filter, looked ok.
hoping that somone might know the trick, seeing as if we can fix things like this the company will toss a few bucks to us, rather than having to outsource for repairs....
thank you in advance for anyone who takes the time to read and maybe even reply...
 
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Old 02-14-21, 11:53 AM
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You replaced the hydraulic hoses and pulled the hydro pump after it quit running???

What is the status of the shutoff on the injector pump? If it does not return to the run position it will not feed fuel to the engine.
 
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Old 02-14-21, 12:27 PM
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There is a proceedure for bleeding all the air out of a diesel system. Give it a thorough bleed and then try to start it.
Be sure to check what Pilot Dane suggested.
If you are not experienced with diesel this could be beyond your expertise. Some units are difficult for even the seasoned mechanic to bleed easily.
 
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Old 02-19-21, 02:18 PM
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no no,.. sorry, my mention of the hydro lines and such, was just to explain my hands on experience with working on one of these things...that work I did a few months ago... I've worked on cars and such, mine and families... but no experience with somethin like this, other than the mentioned repair work Ive done to it....
Im not sure where the shut off is, but will try to google/youtube it.... but would that cause it to just shut down in an instant while running at idle ?

thank you for your time!!
 
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Old 02-19-21, 02:25 PM
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I did do some searching,.. I did attempt to bleed it,.. small bleeder above the pump/filter area,.. cracked it,.. worked the primer, but it only appeared to push a few tiny bubbles,... didnt feel like it was really grabbing much if any fuel... I then opened the drain on the filter,.. only a bit came out of that... tried a couple of times,.. one time it did feel like the primer was finally pushing fuel.... but still didnt fire up after....
No I am not experienced in diesel. I am pretty good with common sense and hands on,... but it didnt appear as though it should be difficult to bleed it,.. unless I'm missing something.....which very well could be... or you may be right with it being more than I can figure out maybe. I'm thinking of hitting it with some starter fluid just to make sure its got fire,.... is that ok with a diesel, or not recommended?

thank you very much for your time....
 
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Old 02-19-21, 06:24 PM
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Is this machine still under a warranty? You might not want to jeopardize the coverage, (or your job) Diesels are their own breed of machine. Get hold of someone with experience with the ones in the Case machine before you do anything else.
 
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Old 02-20-21, 10:28 AM
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Avoid using ether or starting fluid. If not done correctly it can cause the engine to run away uncontrollably. And, it sounds like your core engine is OK and the problem is probably in the fuel system.

It's hard to offer specific advice without knowing the procedure for your engine (I'm too lazy to Google your machine ). On some engines I crack the fuel lines loose at the injectors. Then turn the engine over until fuel is squiring out and tighten the lines.

A older pre electronics diesel will keep running once started. Everything is mechanical and there is no ignition to kill to shut the engine off. So, on the injector pump is a solenoid and often a small lever to mechanically turn off the supply of fuel to the engine. The solenoid allows the key switch to kill the engine but an electrical problem can prevent it from working and your stuck with an engine you can't turn off. So, there is often a lever you move to shut the fuel off. If either of those systems aren't working they could be stuck in the off position. The engine will crank but no fuel is being squirted into the cylinders.
 
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Old 02-20-21, 01:18 PM
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Dane, when I was trying to make a living in a 22 county sales territory, and hauling a mower with a Mitsubishi 3 cylinder engine one day, I got caught in a blinding rainstorm that soaked the mower on an open trailer really well. when I got to the prospective customer' site in a town 80 miles away, I started the tractor, and completed the demo, got it back on the trailer, and you guessed it, the rain shorted out the electronics, and I did not know where the manual shut off to the fuel pump was. I towed the tractor to 3 dealerships, that sold diesels of other brands, and since it was in pre cell phone days, I finally found a pay phone and got hold of one of our service managers who was having a great time at my expense, listening to an engine running on my trailer next to the phone booth. He finally told me that there was a rubber bulb attached to the back of the injector pump that I could just push in and stop the fuel flow, and the engine. In later years, doing sales training myself, I always included this lesson in the diesel training classes, which boiled down to simply, Don't start a diesel if you don't know how to stop it manually lol
 
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Old 02-24-21, 02:58 PM
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not at all, its i think a 90 or 92 model machine, been owned by the company for years.
 
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Old 02-24-21, 03:02 PM
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from what I've learned, its an early 90's model. it does shut off with the key, no manual fuel shutoff needed...
 
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Old 02-24-21, 03:08 PM
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I guess i cant post pix direct from my computer to here? it needs to be posted somewhere else by the looks of it//?
 
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Old 02-24-21, 03:12 PM
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""The solenoid allows the key switch to kill the engine but an electrical problem can prevent it from working and your stuck with an engine you can't turn off. So, there is often a lever you move to shut the fuel off. If either of those systems aren't working they could be stuck in the off position. The engine will crank but no fuel is being squirted into the cylinders.""

would one of those failing cause it to just shut of instantly while sitting at idle? it ran great all day, once I brought it down to idle, less than 2 minutes, it just stopped, not even a sputter before it did.

 
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Old 02-24-21, 05:20 PM
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I would suggest that because this machine does not belong to you stop messing
with it.
If you were working for me I would be happy to have someone who could fix things.
But.....if I thought you were risking damaging something by not knowing what you were doing it would be the opposite of "throwing you a few bucks"!

Please, save your boss some money.
 
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Old 02-24-21, 07:15 PM
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ok,.. really? no need to be rude,.. I am being asked BY THE OWNER to try to get it running.
was simply looking for some help on here.
 
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Old 02-25-21, 04:24 AM
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If you have a diesel with a key for run/kill you would have a solenoid in the system. That just about has to be at the injection pump on that critter. The key run/kill for a lot of automotive type engines (truck stuff) use a type of EFI with a pressurized rail and injectors with solenoids on each of them. They have some variations but that is the general design. The key simply tells the ECM to kill the solenoids on the injectors = fuel stopped at the injector.

You could have a simple mechanical problem like the solenoid gave out or the power to the solenoid was interrupted. You could check that out with a voltmeter and even a test light will give you an idea of the problem in most cases.

The other thing would be a air leak in the lift line going from the tank to the transfer pump. That pump is the one with the primer on it.

Most likely, since it was doing OK and a sudden die down, you ran it out of fuel or got it low enough you got air in the system. But, since you ran the primer and got nothing, there a good chance that is your problem.

What causes problems with bleeding those things is air every where in the system and you have to get it all out. If the lift pump ran out of fuel altogether and just stopped you'd be better off. But it usually get a gulp of air, then a gulp of fuel that pushes the air along the fuel lines. The air hits the injector pump and it dies.

So what you do is get fuel in the tank. Then drain the filter and open the bleeder. Then pump the primer pump until you get nothing but fuel = no bubbles. Close off the bleeder on the filter, it should be full of fuel. Now go to the fittings on the injectors and loosen each of them about a half a turn. You have to let the air escape from each of the injector lines when you crank the engine over.

If it starts shut the engine off and snug each of the line fittings. Now start the engine. It will likely run rough. Go back to each line fitting at the injector, crack it slightly to bleed it, tighten it back down and do the same on the next one. It'll start smoothing out and run normal.

From years of Cat dozer bleeding in all kinds of weather
 
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Old 02-25-21, 02:14 PM
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wow, great info Marbobj !!!, I thank you very much for your time !! I will hopefully get a chance to get at it next week since we are swamped with regular work at this time,.. ... thank you again.
 
 

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