shutting down snowblower for the season


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Old 04-10-21, 09:17 AM
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shutting down snowblower for the season

What are best practices? Should I drain the fuel tank or add stabilizer?
 

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04-10-21, 10:13 AM
joecaption
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I'd drain all the gas out and let it run until the engine stops.
 
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Old 04-10-21, 10:13 AM
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I'd drain all the gas out and let it run until the engine stops.
 
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Old 04-10-21, 10:14 AM
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I would drain all the fuel out of the fuel tank and remove and clean the fuel bowl on the carburetor. Then try and start it. It might run for a few seconds or just sputter but you're just trying to burn out every bit of gas so it's absolutely empty.
 
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Old 04-11-21, 08:44 AM
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I guess I'll be the odd man out - again.

* pour an ounce or so of SeaFoam in the gas tank

* start it and run for 5-10 minutes

* Change the oil

* Next fall top off the tank with new gas, it'll start right up.

I've done this forever with snowblower and lawn mowers, never had a problem.

 
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Old 04-11-21, 09:10 AM
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I pretty much do the same procedure as Baldwin. Must be a Minnesota thing.
 
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Old 04-11-21, 03:17 PM
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Two schools of thought.
I do the drain thing. Think about it this way. When you buy a brand new unit, no fuel is stored in it. And when you do add fuel it starts right up. No chanced of varnish built up or stale gas. No need to sore gas that might be an accelerant in case of fire. No smelly gas fumes that sometimes accompany mowers or blower with gas in them. But the long and short is "dealers" choice. Personally I like the idea of always using new fuel stabilizer throughout the year for that 1 or 2 gal storage that gets used within the season as I switch from blower to mower and other gas using items.
And to do one is no harder than the other.
However as suggested by several of mods here, I did buy premium gas (unable to get aviation fuel) that I kept in my cabin generator over the fall/ winter season. Went out this past week and the thing started up after about 3 - 4 pulls.
 
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Old 04-11-21, 05:23 PM
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Not sure who came up with the idea that using a higher octane fuel is better for normal gas powered equipment, it's simply not true!
It still contains the same amount of ethanol!
I own no less then 16 gas powered tools, every year at the end of the season I run them all out of gas before storing them.
In the spring they all start right up, I have one Trac Vac with a B & S and a stump grinder with a Honda engine that to my pleasant surprise started on the first pull now for three years.
 
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Old 04-11-21, 05:53 PM
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I should've said non-ethanol gas. My bad.

Both systems work. No argument there. I just think the draining is better and easier than holding treated or non-treated gas in a piece of equipment not being used.
 
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Old 04-11-21, 07:10 PM
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I found out the hard way that if you forget the fuel you should have either treated or drained out completely and due to no fault of your own, the fuel gets left in there for a couple of years, THEN you have a varnish nightmare. I drain them all.
 
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Old 04-13-21, 07:21 AM
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I'll go completely off the path here. I have never in all my 58 young years did anything to any piece of power equipment, motorcycle etc. that I've owned for winter storage except park it with a full tank of fuel. With that said, I've never had any piece of equipment ever give me any trouble starting up in the spring time. NJ winters, unheated garage. My .02
 
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Old 04-13-21, 09:15 AM
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Whatever works, stick with it!
 
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Old 04-13-21, 07:18 PM
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this has come up before, and I'll repeat what I do... over 20 years in Maine and I mix marine grade Stabil in every tank of gas I buy, and every year I pull something out of storage, it starts up on the first or second yank.
 
 

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