Toro Timecutter 5050 battery issues


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Old 05-08-21, 04:56 PM
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Toro Timecutter 5050 battery issues

Hi all,

My Toro zero turn is eating up batteries. The charging system is not working. I've had the battery replaced twice in a year and right now I am sitting on my mower, waiting for it to charge...again.

I recently replaced the fuse under the area where the key goes. It was blown. I was hoping that fixed it but apparently it did not. What is the next thing that I can check?
 
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Old 05-08-21, 05:36 PM
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There isn't too much in the loop. I see the alternator with two wires. I see a rectifier/regulator assembly. A fuseholder and the charge wire going to the R terminal.


 
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Old 05-08-21, 06:36 PM
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Do you know where the next item is though? Do I simply check for load at the next point?
 
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Old 05-08-21, 09:49 PM
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Check for 12 volts DC coming from the rectifier.
 
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Old 05-10-21, 04:19 AM
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A short to ground in the alternator or regulator/rectifier will result in a blown F2. Connect a continuity tester between F2 pin2 and ground. Must have continuity. Disconnect alternator wires into regulator/rectifier. If no continuity, alternator needs replacement. If continuity, remove wires from fuse F2 into regulator/rectifier. If no continuity, regulator/rectifier needs replacement. If continuity, wires from fuse F2 into regulator/rectifier need replacement/repair.
 
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Old 05-10-21, 06:11 PM
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@beelzebob can you explain how I would check that? Checking voltage is easy. I never quite get how to check continuity.

Then for your check and checking for 12vs at the rectifier, does the mower need to be on? After two days of charging, fhe new battery is toast. I had to jump it to get it started. Charging it is no longer working.
 
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Old 05-10-21, 10:43 PM
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You need a good battery on it and the engine running for the test. A battery shouldn't be going bad like that unless it is being overcharged.
 
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Old 05-11-21, 05:27 AM
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Continuity in the electrical arena usually refers to a circuit (complete path of electron flow) from the negative voltage source (battery negative terminal in this case) to an external load and back to the positive voltage source (battery positive terminal in this case). A fuse is put in the path to protect the complete path from overcurrent. Usually the battery negative terminal is connected to the mower engine and frame and also referred to as common or ground. When the part of the complete path between the fuse and load come into contact with a ground, it causes an overcurrent and the fuse opens because the complete path has been changed by a wire coming into contact with ground. Since energizing the circuit would just open the fuse, an ohm meter is used to find the altered path because an ohm meter is used on de-energized circuits. The load has much more resistance (referenced to battery positive terminal). than the remainder of the path. The remainder of the path (referenced to battery positive terminal) usually has a resistance of less than 1 ohm. In your case you can use fuse F2, terminal 2 as the reference point for the ohm meter with the fuse removed. With one lead of the ohm meter on fuse 2, terminal 2 and the other lead on ground, the indication will be less than 1 ohm. While observing the indication, move the wire(s) in the path between the fuse and load until indication increases rapidly. This is the location of a wire shorting to ground. Repair wire and verify there is no more short to ground. Install fuse and you should be good to go. Hope this helps.
 
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Old 05-16-21, 01:21 PM
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Thanks all. I'm digging into it now to see if I can figure it out. What I am seeing right away is that the charging fuse blew again. I just changed this 3 weeks ago. Could this be a sign that points out directly what is wrong without having to dig in too much?
 
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Old 05-16-21, 01:45 PM
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Which of these is the regulator/rectifier?




 
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Old 05-16-21, 02:12 PM
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When testing this wire the load constantly fluctuates. It goes from 30 and gradually down to 0...then cycles again. Is this telling me it is causing the issue? If so, does anyone know what that wire goes to and what it could be?


 
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Old 05-16-21, 02:22 PM
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In the last picture is the rectifier/regulator. It is fed by the two yellow wires. That means the green wire is ground and you should be getting a usable DC voltage on the red wire.

In other words.... with the engine running.... you should get at least 12vdc at idle and upwards to 15vdc at high idle between the red wire and ground. (green wire)

You should see high AC voltage on the yellow leads..... especially when not connected to the assembly.
You may see 15+ AC volts here.

Very strange to see 25A (F2) blow. That typically means the rectifier/regulator is shorted.
If that part is bad you won't measure any usable DC voltage on the red wire.
 
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Old 05-16-21, 02:29 PM
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@pxmax, I now cannot get the mower to start. The battery is fried. Even with jumping it, it won't start. The battery is at 11.8vs.

I did check to see what the voltage on the battery was after installing it when it was brand new. Running full power, it only test over 12 volts. The mower shop said that it should elevate over 12v when running.

Is there a way to test the regulator without the mower running?
 
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Old 05-17-21, 04:19 AM
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Have tests suggested in posts 5 and 8 or something else led you to believe the regulator is the cause of the fuse F2 opening?
 
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Old 05-17-21, 02:01 PM
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I have been following post #5 and 8. My issue is ignorance. I am following the paths in the diagram and checking order. When checking the fuse port, it tested fine and it had continuity when being grounded to the battery. The next in the sequence was the regulator. I tested both yellow wires. The one yellow wire was fine and the other was all over. This is with me unplugging the connections and testing the side closest to the regulator and being grounded to the battery.

I am unsure what the wires represent on the regulator. I below the yellow is AC and the red comes from the battery. Then green ground. But if one of the wires signifies the alternator, regulator or something else is what I am unsure of. I don't know what to test next.

I can record a video of this if it helps.
 
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Old 05-18-21, 10:49 AM
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You need to test the engine side of the yellow wires, not the regulator side. Put the meter on AC and check, or just check the red wire on the regulator side with engine running for about 15 volts DC. If you have that, no need to check the yellow wires.
 
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Old 05-20-21, 04:11 AM
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According to the schematic fuse F2 has no affect on the ignition circuit, so an open F2 will not prevent the engine from starting or if running to die. It appears there are multiple issues. I would get the engine running before working on the blown F2 issue.
 
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Old 05-27-21, 10:05 AM
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I bought a new battery so I can now do more testing.

I also replaced the voltage regulator and after running the mower, the charging system fuse blew again. is the only possible option now the alternator? I purchased one so I can replace it but just looking for opinions.
 
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Old 05-27-21, 05:12 PM
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Wrong page, sorry......................................
 
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Old 05-28-21, 03:57 AM
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What did you do between post 13 and 18 to get the engine to run? Have you verified the wire from fuse 2 post 2 to the rectifier/regulator is not shorting to frame ground? It could be intermittent.
 
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Old 05-28-21, 10:09 AM
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The only reason it wasn't running was because the battery was fried. I installed a new battery and it was fine.

I'm not sure how to test if there is a short between the fuse and rectifier. Could someone explain this? I'm really trying to learn but I am a newbie when it comes to this. Any chance someone could make a video?
 
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Old 05-28-21, 11:49 PM
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Do you have a volt/ohm meter?
 
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Old 05-29-21, 12:02 AM
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Yes, I have a volt meter.
 
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Old 05-29-21, 01:26 PM
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Set the meter on AC volts. I don't know how many ranges or AC settings your meter has, but you need to be able to read in the 25 to 35 volt range. connect the red lead to one of the two wires coming from the stator (alternator) and the black lead to the negative battery terminal. With the engine running full throttle, you should get somewhere around 32 volts. Do the same on the other wire. If both are producing 32-ish volts AC, then the alternator is good and we can move to the next step.
 
 

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