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PentaVolvo's Avatar
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Join Date: May 2001
Posts: 124
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07-09-01, 09:26 PM   #1  
I have an older 12 HP Craftsman riding lawn mower. It runs very warm, you can smell it after you shut it down, I don't know how to explain it. What could be causing it? It is also very rust, could this be it. Can I pull start be easily wired to this in place of the electric starter?

 
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Join Date: Feb 1998
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07-10-01, 06:09 PM   #2  
Hello PentaVolvo

You'll need to verify that there aren't any cooling air flow restrictions. Pull the flywheel cover off and clear out any debris under the cover, along the air flow path and on the cyclinder head.

If the rust is on or inbetween the cooling fins, on the cyclinder head, wire brush off as much as possible. Inspect inside the flywheel cover also.

Take a spark plug reading also. The plug firing tip should not be white. Slightly black/brown/or tan in color is fine.

Also check the heat range of the plug. Often this does not change the internal operating temperature of an engine. Be sure the correct plug is installed.

If the engine is running too lean on fuel, this will also cause excessive heat. A spark plug reading will indicate a lean fuel mixture, if the spark plug tip is white.

You may need to richen up the fuel mixture some. Adjust the fuel mixture screw, on the carb body, a little by turning it out. {counterclock wise} The engine should puff out a tiny bit of black smoke.

When a slight bit of black smoke puffs out of the muffer, turn the screw inwards slightly. {Clockwise}

Ideal fuel mixture is a mid point between too much fuel {Black Exhaust Smoke} and too little. Too litlle is when the engine just starts to die. The mid point between the two is idea. Just slight rich {1/8 turn out} is okay too.

Suggestion:
Clean the air flow paths and retest engine prior to making any carb adjustments.

Regards and Good Luck,
Tom_Bartco
Accurate Power Equipment Company.
Small Engine Service and Repair Technician.
Personal Quote:
"If it ain't broke, don't fix it until it is broken!"

 
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