Throttle lever came loose on CC GT 2500


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Old 03-31-24, 09:25 AM
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Throttle lever came loose on CC GT 2500

The throttle lever mechanism on my Cub Cadet GT2500 mounts to the back side of the dash by a couple of screws that thread into knurled nuts that are embedded in the (plastic) dash. The lever mount came loose because the knurled nuts wallowed out their holes.

I tried putting the knurled nuts back in with JB Weld (which I gave two days to set) but they didn't hold. Maybe the dash material is crumbling, I dunno.

Anyway, at this juncture I'm thinking the simplest way to mend this is to drill the mounting holes through to the top of the dash, then run bolts through from the backside and put nuts on the top.

This is what I'm looking at:


^^^^^^Top side at left, back side at right ^^^^^^

This is how it looked before I did the first cable swap:



The problem I see with the drill-through plan is that if I'm going to preserve the structural strength of what's left of the dash, I need not to be drilling holes in random places, followed by more holes in more suitable places, based on the landmarks left by the first holes. So I figure I first should drill pilot holes from the back side through the factory holes provided for the knurled nuts. Then once I've got the factory holes positively located, drill a suitably-sized nut down from the front.

But I know from once before having replaced the throttle cable that the lever mount is in an impossibly confined spot, too crowded by structural members and the hood support struts to get even the stubbiest of screwdrivers on the upper screw and have it running straight. The lower mount point is only very slightly better. So if I can't even swing a very short screwdriver in there, how am I supposed to drill?

I tried holding a common nail in one of the holes and pounding it with a socket wrench, hoping I could at least raise at least the tiniest bump on the front but all I managed to do was bend the nail. And my awls are all too long to get into the holes, much less beat on the after.

If I can't figure a way to drill this out, the only other solution I can think of is completely removing the dash (or helm, to use a nautical term), which would require, among other things, unbolting the hood lift struts and taking off the steering wheel. Plus unplugging a slew of electrical connectors. All of which I'd sooner not do.

All that to get to this. What can I use to make my pilot holes from the backside? Of if you've got a better plan, I'm all ears.
 
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Old 03-31-24, 09:59 AM
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That looks like sheet metal nuts inside the bosses. Have you tried a larger diameter sheet metal screw (length less than or equal to boss depth)? If the nut turns when tightening the screw, squeeze boss and nut with pliers.
 

Last edited by beelzebob; 03-31-24 at 10:03 AM. Reason: Complete reply didn't transfer
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Old 03-31-24, 10:40 AM
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Here are the screws and nuts. The JB Weld held to the nut but not to the plastic.

I don't know how rigid the bosses are but it's too tight to get anything in there except a small pair of pliers, and they're slightly recessed in a cavity that complicates getting enough of a purchase on them to compress them.

One reason I'm focused on thru-drilling is I'm eventually sure to have to do this again, and having the nuts on top of the console where there's plenty of room to swing a wrench drastically simplifies the process.
 
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Old 03-31-24, 11:40 AM
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Heat a wire with a torch and poke it through the holes from the back to the front.
 
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Old 03-31-24, 12:01 PM
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cheese, I had thought of that, along with a lot of reasons why it won't work. The biggest problem (in all cases) is you can't get a straight run at the holes from more than three or four inches away. But while I've been writing this it occurs to me I've got lots of "retired" bicycle wheel spokes lounging around, doing nothing to earn their keep. They're small enough to do the job, and stiff enough (maybe), but they're also flexible enough to snake them around the suspension bits that are in the way. Maybe I could run one in there with the one hand outside all the structural bits, coming in at a small angle, but redirect it straight into the hole holding a pot holder in the other hand.

It might work. I'll go dig up a spoke and put a point on it and see what's what.
 
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Old 03-31-24, 12:18 PM
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Well I'll be hawg-tied.

I was heating with a propane torch, and the spoke never turned red, so I doubted it was getting hot enough. I was wrong. It worked like a charm.

It took me longer to cut the spoke into a point with a dremmel tool (that sucker was HARD!) than it did to burn the holes.

I am much obliged for your assistance!
 
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Old 03-31-24, 12:21 PM
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If you get down to trying something else, you might try a T nut. Those hold at a larger circumference.
 
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Old 03-31-24, 04:07 PM
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Huzzzah!



This is like 10,000 times easier to remove and re-install than the factory botch-job was.

The fact that the factory install used combo screw heads on the back side made it even worse. Anything you could turn (or hold stationary) from the side would have been muy mas bueno, so I replaced them with allen heads.
 
 

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