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Craftsman Chainsaw


Fyxxez's Avatar
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10-18-01, 02:09 PM   #1  
Fyxxez
My friend gave me a saw he never uses from his garage when his wife and he cleaned the garage. Lucky me, free saw.
So I tried to start it , pull, pull . Nothing . I noticed then that fuel line where it comes out of the case and goes into the handle is cracked in two. Same thing other end of the handle where it goes back into the case to the fuel tank. I bought some new rubber fuel line at a local parts house . You can see thru it. I put it on. Fresh gas/mix , cleaned the plug. Pulled and pulled, nothing. Popped the cover off the carb, primed it. Fired right up until the prime was gone. Choked it ,pulled and pulled , I can see no fuel is being drawn up to the carb , because I can see thru the fuel line. I thought at first I might've kinked it or the filter in the tank was clogged so I had a little extra fuel line, took it ran straight from the carb into the fuel tank, still no fuel is sucked. This is about an 8-10 yr old craftsman saw m# 358.355060. Walpro carb . I took the line ,hooked it to the carb , blew thru it , heard air go thru, but evidently it needs a kit put in it or maybe I should try some spray cleaner first?Took 1 small cover off the carb , saw what looks like some kind of reed valve or something, but as of yet as far as I went.I saw on sears.com part website the exploded view of the carb and I think I can put a kit into it. So am I going the right direction?

 
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10-18-01, 02:48 PM   #2  
Frosty
Yup Carburetor

Hi Fyxxez,

You are definitely headed in the right direction. Taken into account of its apparent lack of use, that fuel turned into varnish a long time ago. Fuel obstruction is your problem. You're able accumulate enough fuel in the cylinder with the primer to get it to turn over. But the clogged fuel inlet holes are not letting enough gas through under its own power. If you feel confident enough to take it apart, there are 2 small fuel inlet holes that need to be cleaned w/ carb cleaner. Just make a note, of the general placing of the screws on the carb before you take them out. The diagram off of the Sears website will be able to guide you through this. I don't believe you need a new carb kit, just clean your existing one with carb cleaner. And if you're careful in taking it apart all the seals inside can be reused if they're in good shape (still flexible and not torn).

Also since you have a new clear fuel line and can see the new fuel/gas mix in it leading to the carburetor, then its safe to say your gas cap is venting properly.

OR you can buy a new carburetor from sears for the saw and save the time of cleaning out your existing one. But if you feel confident enough to try to clean it out yourself, then try it. Because hey, if you mess up, you can always buy that new carb.


Good Luck.

 
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10-18-01, 04:36 PM   #3  
Hi: Fyxxez

Excellent advice and suggestions offered by Frosty in reply to your question. I would highly suggest you give the carb cleaning a try also.

About the only problem, aside from any possible reassembly mechanical errors {incorrectly reinstalling the parts...}that might be made is a problem with the old diaphram.

They do dry out and become unable to fluctuate with atmospheric air pressure and engine vacumm. You may want to replace that part on the first attempt and avoid the hassles, grief, %$#@#!!%%$#ING'S and aggravations of having to do the job twice.

Regards and Good Luck,
Tom_Bart.....
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10-19-01, 01:59 AM   #4  
Fyxxez
Well the saw was free, I already have a saw now. But I thought I might sell it to my neighbor,or sell my other one to him as this one has a bit longer bar. If I can't figure it out I know a guy who has a small engine shop , but I hate paying for what I can do myself!

 
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10-30-01, 05:38 PM   #5  
Fyxxez
Ok, took the carb off, shot some cleaner into all the holes, let dry, put it all back together, fired right up.
Anybody know how to set the needle valves on it?Its a little walpro carb. I see it has 2 valves , H= high speed? L= low speed?

 
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10-30-01, 07:32 PM   #6  
Frosty
Hooray!

That's great to hear it started right up. Now it's a free chainsaw that runs. Yes, H=High speed and L=Low speed.

As for the adjustment, I'd have to say the master put it best:

[QUOTE]Originally posted by Tom_Bartco
[B]Hello redly2

"Basic beginning settings should be about 1 1/2 turns out for the {L} low speed jet and about 2 turns out for the high speed jet.

Once you get the engine started, rotate the {L} low speed jet until the engine {while idling} just begins to stall out from lack of fuel, then turn out the jet until it runs slightly rich. Half way between the two turns is about correct.

About 1/8th turn open for low speed jet beyond the actual 1/2 way point should be correct. Too lean and the engine will stumble when accelerating between idle speed to full speed.

High speed setting should be done exactly the same, except turn the jet screw outwards until the engine runs too rich and then turn the screw inwards until the engine does not exhaust black unburned gas out of the muffler.

If the carb is functioning correctly, the settings discribed above will work correctly. The most common problem made is running an engine too lean in the high speed setting.

Running too lean can cause several problems for an air cooled engine. Running HOT is just one of the major problems and the other is a hole in the piston crown or dome... neither of which is desirable...."






Congrats on getting it running!

 
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02-11-04, 01:16 PM   #7  
I have a similar problem. Although, I think I have a fuel leak where the new line I installed connects to the handle. The chainsaw fires up and then dies. I was using it just the other day but the brittle fuel line broke. I replaced it with a generic clear fuel line.

 
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02-11-04, 02:15 PM   #8  
I found my problem. The hose that runs inside the handle to the carb has failed as well.

OK, how does the choke knob come off? Pry off? The diagram for my model (Sears Craftsman 358.355141) does not show a retaining clip.

 
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02-11-04, 11:30 PM   #9  
Hello jmartin!

I'm not looking at a diagram, but unless I'm mistaken, the choke lever comes off with the air filter cover. 2 flat head screws, 1 on either side and it's off.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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02-11-04, 11:35 PM   #10  
I just checked the diagram for that saw, and it was just like I was thinking...look at the two screws on the diagram that hold the black plastic cover on. Those are what you need to remove to gain access to the carb. If for some reason you still are wanting to remove the choke lever, you can gain access to the underside of it from under that cover.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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02-15-04, 12:37 PM   #11  
Perfect! That worked. Chainsaw is back in action.

 
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02-16-04, 01:12 AM   #12  
Great! Glad we could help!


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God bless!

 
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