White walls being painted dark color


  #1  
Old 09-09-02, 11:14 AM
shelleybond
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White walls being painted dark color

Hi, Mike---You responded to someone else's dilemma about her dark paint not covering well, "Hello mrsdebfoote, what could have been done is to paint the walls with high quality flat latex made a few shades darker than the final color. " I am going to be covering white walls with a deep rose or bugundy color. Am I understanding correctly that you are you saying I should use a flat color paint in a slightly darker shade than my new color AS A BASE COAT?

Thanks.
Shelley
 
  #2  
Old 09-10-02, 07:06 AM
mikejmerritt
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Hello shelleybond, you have got it. The flat paint will cover so much better than paint with a sheen and will save many coats of say eggshell made to a dark color. In your case if you are buying both the flat and the finish color at the same place you could get them made just alike. Make sure your flat coat is covered well even if you have to cut it in twice to get rid of the white.....Mike
 
  #3  
Old 09-11-02, 04:12 AM
B
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if I may add to this...

Shellybond - the color you have chosen has a lot of pigment. It is difficult to get all that pigment evenly distributed. Do paint with a flat sheen first. You can use a tinted primer if you wish to save a some cash.

Now this is important. The final result will only be as good as your tools and materials. You do get what you pay for. There is a huge difference between the $2 special and the $12 brush. Buy high quality brushes and roller sleeves. If using latex paint, make sure the brushes and sleeves are for latex paints.

Keep a wet edge - if it takes you a long time to cut in, then have someone help you. Do one wall at a time. Don't over brush nor over roll. Its very tempting for DIYers to do both.

Finally - be aware that you may need more than 2 top coats. Don't get frustrated if you do.
 
  #4  
Old 09-11-02, 07:46 AM
shelleybond
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Hi, Bob--Thanks for the info. Could I have a little more info on "Keep a wet edge - if it takes you a long time to cut in, then have someone help
you. Do one wall at a time. Don't over brush nor over roll. Its very tempting for DIYers to do both." I don't know the terms "wet edge" or "cut in". How does one tell if they are over rolling or over brushing?

Thanks again.
Shelley
 
  #5  
Old 09-12-02, 04:03 AM
B
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Cutting in is painting next to the woodwork (baseboards, windows trim, door trim), ceiling, wall corners, etc - anywhere the roller won't reach cleanly.

Keeping a wet edge means working so what was peviously painted doesn't dry before aplying paint next to it. This is not the same as curing. Paint may be dry to the touch but still not cured.

This isn't critical on the first coat since you will put on a second coat anyway.

As for over-brushing/over-rolling: If you go over it more than twice you are close to over-rolling. It depends on how thick/thin you applied the coat. With the brush, the first stroke you are applying paint next to the trim. The second stroke evens out the coat. With a roller, the first stroke applies paint to the unpainted strip next to the last strip. The second stroke blends the two strips. DIY books and shows preach applying the roller in a W fashion. Too many DIYers over-roll with this technique because cheap paint and cheap roller sleeves don't cover well. So they roll and roll to cover the wall.

With "normal" pigmented paints, this isn't critical. With heavily pigmented paints it is.
 
  #6  
Old 09-12-02, 10:30 AM
shelleybond
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Got it! Thanks much for the explanations. A lot of this is news to me -- I would have made a big mess, but now I at least have a hope of getting it right.

Best,
Shelley
 
 

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