caulking brick moulding


  #1  
Old 10-03-02, 04:05 AM
josh1
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caulking brick moulding

I dont know if i already posted this but i didnt get any replies or my comp froze so here it is again.

I need to recaulk around french doors that are surrounded by brick exterior wall. There is 1 1/2" wide wooden brick moulding. I want a clean look ( read im ultra perfectionistic) Is there any type of tool that helps make a smooth bead of caulk when going over the masonry mortar joints without getting all globby? Or is it just a matter of caulking skill? Thanks for any tips-Josh
 
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Old 10-03-02, 04:19 AM
T
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Procedure for Using Caulk Gun

1. Use the cutting tool to snip off the end of (or open) a new tube of caulk.
2. Use the thin metal rod to puncture the seal inside a new cylinder of caulk.
3. Put the cylinder of caulk in the caulk gun and use the trigger to pump caulk onto the surface of the project where desired.
4. Applying caulk in this way is called laying a bead of caulk. When the bead is in place, use a damp rag to smooth out the surface of the caulk and bond it to the project.

There are several common types of caulk. Silicone-based caulk - bonds to almost anything, but isnīt paintable.
Acrylic or latex-based caulk - similar to silicone-based caulk, but is paintable. Clear caulk - primarily good for allowing the project surface to show through. Concrete or Masonry caulk - ideal for concrete and masonry surfaces.

Caulk comes in cylinders or squeeze tubes. Cylinders requires the use of a caulk gun while squeeze tubes can be applied directly to a project surface.
Many types of caulk come in colors for matching the caulk color to the surface color.
Caulk can only fill in spaces about 1/4 inch deep, so large holes or voids must be filled in with some other material first. Then, caulk can be applied on the surface as a sealant.

Getting Ready to Paint. lifetips.com. Retrieved 03 October 2002.
http://painting.lifetips.com/PPF/id/8497/Cat.asp
 
  #3  
Old 10-03-02, 04:52 AM
josh1
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I should specify, Ill be using siliconized acrylic ( i think unless i go masonry type). I have caulked but mostly around outlet boxes, nothing pretty. This has to be pretty. The doors need repainted ( already primered and sanded) should i paint and then use a caulking or caulk then paint? Im just foreseeing all kinds of mess with the caulk and that porous brick mortar. Maybe if i go a real real small bead? like 1/16? ( you should see me with x-panding foam its just messy!) Thanks-josh
 
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Old 10-03-02, 05:31 AM
T
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Caulking

Caulking is usually done prior to painting.

Caulks have experienced a significant transformation during the past 45 years. Linseed and oil based caulks were used on a widespread basis up until the 1950's. During the 60's and 70's acrylic latex and silicone caulks began to appear. Because caulks need to stick to things, they are closely related, chemically speaking, to adhesives. In fact, I'll bet that you have seen adhesive caulks at your local stores.

Inasmuch as caulks are used to fill cracks between things that frequently move, it is important for them to have a high degree of flexibility. The older oil based caulks almost always became brittle with age. Acrylic latex and silicone caulks are formulated so that they will remain flexible for many years.

100 percent silicone caulk is made by reducing silica sand into a basic silicone oil polymer. In order to give the caulk body, fillers such as mica (a mineral) and clay are added. These caulks work best when used on non-porous objects such as metals and glass. The silicone oil makes it virtually impossible for paints to adhere to 100 percent silicone caulk. This oil tends to bleed slowly out of the caulk for many years.

100 percent silicone caulks require moisture from the air in order to cure. If you live in a dry climate, you will notice that these caulks take a longer time to dry. As the silicone caulk cures it emits acetic acid, one of the primary ingredients of vinegar. These fumes can irritate your eyes and nose.

Acrylic latex caulks are comprised of acrylic polymers, latex, water, and fillers. They bond very well to porous materials such as wood, masonry, plaster, and drywall. These caulks cure, or dry, as the water in them evaporates. Acrylic polymers and latex have excellent flexibility. They also retain this flexibility for long periods of time. Also, paints adhere well to the fillers that are present in these caulks.

Some of your confusion may arise from acrylic latex caulks that contain silicone or 'paintable' silicones. Some acrylic latex caulks contain small amounts of silicone. The silicone is added to improve their flexibility. The paintable water based silicone caulks often contain high amounts of fillers which allow paint to adhere to them. However, the high filler content tends to have an adverse affect on the overall performance of the caulk.

You and I have shared a similar experience. When I first used a clear acrylic latex caulk, I thought the manufacturer had made a mistake. I never believed that the white caulk would dry clear. I was wrong. The white color in the caulk is caused by the presence of latex. The latex in the caulk is derived chemically. It is similar in nature to the milky colored fluid produced from plants belonging to the milkweed family. As the water evaporates from the latex the structure of the caulk changes so that the caulk becomes transparent. Light waves travel directly through the caulk.

There are caulks available to suit just about any purpose. You can purchase caulks that look like brick mortar, blacktop, and concrete. Special low temperature caulks are available that adhere to cold, damp surfaces. Caulks are made that seal aluminum gutter joints which commonly leak due to expansion and contraction caused by temperature changes. There is a caulk for just about any need.

Carter, Tim. Caulks - Which One For What? Tim Carter Builder, Inc. 1994. Retrieved 03 October 2002. http://www.askbuild.com/cgi-bin/column?053
arter,
 
  #5  
Old 10-03-02, 06:13 AM
TomBT
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That's quite the dissertation on caulks... I enjoyed it. I usually carry a wet paper towl or a moist rag and after applying a bead of caulk, use my figure to smooth it out. Don't apply much pressure though. Yeah, I think a good caulk job is based on experience. But if you're a perfectionist, you should be able to do as well as the pros.....when you apply the caulk, try to move in a continuous fashion with the caulk gun. That is, go from point A to point B while applying even pressure on your gun laying down a continuous bead in the process....
 
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Old 10-06-02, 07:38 PM
C
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1/16" bead is physically too small to perform the intended task. The directions on the caulk tube will recommend minimum and maximum dimensions for caulking.

I find that tooling with a finger to be easier and more controllable, too.
 
 

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