Painting TALL walls


  #1  
Old 10-24-02, 10:50 AM
MotoBill
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Painting TALL walls

I have a condo with vaulted ceilings (20-25 feet high) that I am getting ready to paint. I've been doing all of the "normal" height walls first and now I must tackle these beasts (Unfortunately, I can't avoid them any longer!)

Has anybody tried using a Paint Stick (I think that is what it is called) or something similar when paiting tall walls. I am thinking that this would be easier than lugging a paint bucket up and down the ladder all day long.

Any help/suggestions will be greatly appreciated!!!

Bill
 
  #2  
Old 10-24-02, 11:36 AM
T
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Painting vaulted ceilings

An extension pole comes in handy for painting tall walls and high ceilings. Scaffolding can be rented.
 
  #3  
Old 10-24-02, 12:26 PM
MotoBill
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I've been checking into scaffolding, however I haven't found any that will fit on my landing. So, I figured that wall (acutally two) would require a ladder.

I'm just nervous about carrying a bucket of paint and a roller up and down the ladder every time I need to move the ladder. I thought that if the paint stick type of rollers work, that might be a good option.

I'll keep looking into scaffolding also.
Thanks!
Bill
 
  #4  
Old 10-24-02, 02:00 PM
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Stairwell painting

Painting the upper reaches of a stairwell can be a difficult chore. It's usually fairly high and there's no good place to set the ladder. Try this. Set an extension ladder on one of the lower steps and lean the top against the wall opposite the top of the stairs. Set a small stepladder (six-foot size) on the landing at the top of the stairs. Then run a 2x12 between the rungs of the two ladders so that its level and you've created a stairwell scaffolding. Be sure that the 2x12 is secured to at least one of the ladders with a "C" clamp or similar device. If the span you've created is more than eight feet or so you may want to nail a vertical support under the 2x12 at mid-span.

Simple Solutions -Stairwell Painting Tip. dannylipford.com. Retrieved 24 October 2002. http://www.dannylipford.com/show486.html

You won't be able to get your roller into a bucket of paint. When I have had to paint tall walls and ceilings, each time I had to reload the roller with paint, I climbed back down and loaded the roller in the paint try. May sound a little primitive, but that's how this little person did it.
 
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Old 10-25-02, 12:18 PM
MotoBill
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You won't be able to get your roller into a bucket of paint.
Actually, I put the paint in a large bucket (2 or 5 gallon, depending on the project) and use a screen. That's been working great, much better than the roller pan!

Thanks for the link. That tip may work for the lower portion of the stairwell. I'll still have to use a ladder for the high portions. These ceilings seemed really cool until now!

Anybody out there tried any paint roller system that feeds the paint to the roller???

Bill
 
  #6  
Old 10-25-02, 03:11 PM
T
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Painting tall walls

I don't quite understand the bucket and screen trick. I weigh 116 lbs, so I am not able to wield a large bucket. When I edge out and/or do crown molding, I carry a tiny bucket up the ladder.

I know some ladders have those little fold down shelves where you can place the roller pan, but I have always been chicken to trust myself up on the ladder with a pan of paint. Especially, when I am scooting the ladder along at a rapid pace. I always wrap the ladder legs in rags and tape them, making socks to protect hardwood floors.
 
  #7  
Old 10-26-02, 06:27 AM
silverghost
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I just did a similar room -

a large family room with 20-foot ceilings. I did the upper wall areas from a ladder with a roller and pole. Like you, I used a 5 gal bucket and hooked a roller grid/screen over the edge of it (couple o' bucks at Home Depot).

Cutting out around the top of the room has to be done by hand. I did it from an extension ladder and took a small bucket up with me (it has a neat handle that fits over the back of my hand). Scaffolding is a good idea, but here they are expensive and hard to find. Use a 20 or 24 ft ladder and rubber end covers to protect the walls (about $8 at Lowe's/Home Depot).

For the tall stairway, I didn't think of the ladder and 2x12 that someone else suggested. I just leaned an extension ladder against the wall - one leg on a step, and the other leg on a common cinder block setting on the next lower step (the stairs are carpeted). Worked for me!

Good luck,
Dave
 

Last edited by silverghost; 10-26-02 at 07:10 AM.
 

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