WHY do we use semi gloss for kitchen ceilings?!


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Old 11-04-02, 10:09 AM
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WHY do we use semi gloss for kitchen ceilings?!

All my ceilings throughout the house are painted gloss or semi-gloss; now that I am ready to paint the kitchen I would like to use something else besides the traditional semi-gloss for kitchen paint which I don’t fully understand why it has to be semi-gloss; I am not a big fan of shiny ceilings.
What else can I use?
 
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Old 11-04-02, 12:10 PM
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I don't use semi-gloss for ceilings. I use flat white paint. Works great.

Semi-gloss is more for surfaces that will need to be washed.
 
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Old 11-04-02, 12:39 PM
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Ditto here... my kitchen ceilings are bare, textured plaster. They look fine after 20 years!
 
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Old 11-04-02, 12:49 PM
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Ditto here... my kitchen ceilings are bare, textured plaster. They look fine after 20 years! If you are planning on painting over the semi-gloss, be sure to clean it and rough it up slighlty.
 
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Old 11-04-02, 01:02 PM
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I plan on doing just that. the reason I am painting the ceiling is because I removed some soffits; now I have new drywall right next to old drywall; not sure yet how this job will look like after applying paint to the two different surfaces. they are leveled though.

still not sure why we semigloss is recommened for kitchen ceiling.
 
  #6  
Old 11-04-02, 03:01 PM
ohnonowwhat?
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Here's What I Think

Gloss & semi-gloss are easier to clean and hold up better against the kind of cleaning solutions one might use in a kitchen.

As for how your new plaster will look next to old plaster, I think if you prime both surfaces before you paint, it will be fine.
 
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Old 11-04-02, 07:21 PM
mikejmerritt
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Left Over Thinking......

.....in my area semi-gloss ceilings are from a time when wood/unvented stoves were used and they would be easier to clean. There always is a guy who insists that they be done that way and it leaves the owner wondering. I think ceilings should be flat/raw texture but thats just me. Follow the advice here and you will be pleased.....Mike
 
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Old 11-05-02, 08:41 AM
TomBT
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I'm one of those guys who prefers a semi-gloss finish for kitchen and bathroom walls, ceilings & trim. In truth, you can go with a flat finish if you like. I do use flat paints for all other walls and ceilings. The only reason to go with semi-gloss is ease of cleaning. Especially if you're trying to clean grease over the cook top or soda that has defied gravity. A gloss surface is simply easier to clean but it also makes imperfections on your walls and ceilings stand out. You can go with a textured surface to but cleaning the "peaks and valleys" is a challenge. If you like flat, go for it. Lightly sand the existing surface and if it's an oil finish you might need to sand and prime before applying your finish coat. Since it is a kitchen, make sure you clean any grease from your surfaces before sanding and painting.
 
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Old 11-06-02, 08:30 AM
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I am wondering what percentage of people who have actually took a sponge to their ceiling to remove gravity defying objects or to just bring it back to its original color due to possible yellowing.
is it really that high? I dont know. I know I have never done that.

I might, just might, go with a satin kitchen walls for easy cleaning but I just have an issue with ceiling having any shine.

thanks for all your inputs; looks like I will need to ruff and prime first.
any special primer I should be using considering I will be painting two different adjacent surfaces; one surface with new drywall and other with existing glossy paint. I do my shopping out of the orange or blue box( they are both nearby)
 

Last edited by handyhand; 11-06-02 at 08:46 AM.
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Old 11-06-02, 07:43 PM
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I have never had a ceiling yellow.

PVA primer is the norm for drywall. It works great on regular walls. Plain old latex primer.
 
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Old 11-07-02, 11:05 AM
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I will take the responses as an ok to use flat ceiling paint.
I have another question I need your help on.
which roller do I use- nap size?

As mentioned before I have two kitchen ceiling surfaces adjacent to one another: raw unpainted drywall and existing semi-gloss painted drywall. I want to use the thickest nap possible to create a good matching texure between the two surfaces.
Is a 3/4" nap- lambs wool ok! yaa it costs a fortune more but I am gonna take care of that animal and get the most millage out of it and eventually paint the entire house with it-interior latex paint.

1: what do you think about the roller nap: is it thick enough-should I get a thicker one? I wanna make sure I get a good texure match between the two surfaces- dont wanna take a chance.
2: and how about the animal nap? is it a problem?

dang it! I am being pressured by the household to get something done this weekend.
 

Last edited by handyhand; 11-07-02 at 11:22 AM.
 

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