Told not to prime new drywall!

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  #1  
Old 11-29-02, 10:04 PM
Robin_G
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Told not to prime new drywall!

When I asked a pro what type of primer to use on my newly installed drywall I was told not to use a primer but just use two coats of high quality paint because it yields a better finish.
Besides costing me more money, is there any benefit to using topcoat paint as a primer instead of PVA primer or it's equivalent?
 
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Old 11-29-02, 11:19 PM
Y
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pro? i dont think so

All new drywall should be primed with a primer or high solids flat latex.
The drywall and the joint compound will absorb the paint differently.
Yes, even the little bit covering the nails/screws. Primers will solve this.
Primers seal better and create a stronger bond between the drywall and the paint.
eggshell will not cover well and will have less adherance to the wall and in a bathroom -i would do it right
but dont believe me-read the instructions on the can and call the people who made the drywall and they will tell u same thing

2 coats of eggshell wouldnt be enough anyway-you would still see plastered areas

prime once
2 coats on top

Now - find a different painter.
 
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Old 11-30-02, 09:36 AM
Robin_G
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Re: pro? i dont think so

Thanks for your opinion, it agrees with the guys over at Sherwin Williams and also with my "gut instinct" so that is the direction that I am going to go in.
It great to have a forum like this for a reality check!
 
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Old 11-30-02, 05:15 PM
B
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Let me throw something else into this.

Many years ago I had a paint manufacturer's technical representative (don't remember which manufacturer) tell me that if I really wanted a first quality job on new walls, I should paint just the areas with joint compound with primer. When that was dry, then go over everything with primer. The result is that the joint compound gets 2 coats of primer and everything else (the drywall) gets just 1 coat of primer. I was told that the joint compound has a much higher rate of suction than the drywall and may telegraph thru the finish coats.

I've done this ever since. Has anyone else ever heard this?

Bruce
 
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Old 11-30-02, 07:16 PM
C
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I have found that you get much better results from a full primer coat on drywall mud and drywall. The shortcuts look terrible.
 
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Old 12-01-02, 03:05 AM
B
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chfite:
I think you misunderstand. They aren't shortcuts, or at least I don't think they are because it's an extra step.

On the first coat of primer, you prime just the areas with joint compound: corners, seams, screw heads, etc. Once that first coat dries, then a second coat of primer goes over the entire wall: both joint compound and drywall.

What I end up with when done priming is 2 coats primer on joint compound and 1 coat primer on drywall.

So, have I lost my mind (well, probably, but I mean in regards to extra primer coat on the joint compound areas )?

Bruce
 
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Old 12-01-02, 06:05 AM
mikejmerritt
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My 2 Cents Worth....

Use a good latex primer on new drywall!!! The drywall compound is very stable but the paper areas of drywall have acids and bonding adhesives that over time will deteriorate behind wallpaper and paint that has not been primed. I don't mean the drywall will crumble some day but the first couple of coats of paper on it will not be stable and can discolor paint.....Mike
 
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Old 12-01-02, 07:03 PM
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What I meant by shortcuts is just painting the wall and skipping the primer. These recommendations are from the same who don't prime exterior wood, just a finish coat; leaving the homeowner to repaint in 5 years.
 
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Old 12-02-02, 06:15 PM
T
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I just asked this question on this forum about two weeks ago. I was told the same thing.....that two coats will do just the same thing.

I was told that primer and paint are NOT the same...different properties and such.

I primed my rock with 'firstcoat' and that new dry wall really sucks it up! I got a real good coat on and my paint went on so smooth and covered so well.......

The guy that told me not to prime works on new houses that are nice, but they cut alot of corners to make them affordable. I believe the 'no primer' route is taken when cost out-weighs quality. JMO Trip
 
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Old 12-02-02, 07:52 PM
mikejmerritt
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Primer and Paint.....

.....are not the same thing....Amen! First Coat is a good example of a dedicated drywall primer. Its not designed to cover but seal and flatten out new drywall. Having said that, First Coat isn't the best thing out there but for less than $10.00 a gallon, worth the money....Mike
 
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Old 12-04-02, 12:39 PM
Bryanx0a0d
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You can also have the primer tinted to that the final color comes out better.

Q: How do I calculate how much primer I need for a room? Is there some rule-of-thumb like 1 gallon per 100 square feet?

Bryan
 
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Old 12-05-02, 05:07 AM
mikejmerritt
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A good heavy coat of primer back rolled should go about 300 or more square feet to a gallon......Mike
 
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Old 05-03-13, 09:21 PM
J
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PRIME! Absolutely!

I've done a lot of painting over the years. 1 or even 2 coats of a GOOD primer is essential over drywall for the best finished result. Zinsser bullseye is really nice stuff. While still wet it looks slightly grey or purplish grey and then dries white - makes for a nice ceiling paint, and is a very good primer. Kilz water-based is garbage. Behr is ok. Glidden PVA primer is decent for regular drywall but not as good on green or purple board.

Near me we have a place called [Company name redacted - No advertising allowed.] that makes good primer and paints. I usually get my stuff from them, including the Zinsser primer.

Good luck!
 

Last edited by ray2047; 05-03-13 at 10:10 PM. Reason: Remove company name. Copy of original before editing archived.
  #14  
Old 05-04-13, 05:25 AM
M
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It's rarely ever necessary to apply more than 1 coat of primer. The primer's job is to seal the substrate and provide a good base for the top coat. Quality coatings [primer and finish] always do a better job than their cheaper counterparts.

if I really wanted a first quality job on new walls, I should paint just the areas with joint compound with primer.
There are several methods of doing this. One is to completely coat the wall with j/c and either knife off the majority of it or let it dry and then sand. Mixing j/c and primer also works well but often needs an extra bit of sanding to make it right. Now days there are hi build primers like USG's 1stCoat that make the process easier. While hi build primers do a good job of leveling the surface they aren't a great primer for sealing it. Ideally you'd put a sealing primer over the hi build primer.

Many of the cheaper built new homes are painted without a primer many with just 1 coat of paint on the walls. That doesn't make the job right! One of the neatest compliments I've ever gotten of a paint job was from a blind man. I repainted his 15 yr old house and fixed all the stuff that was neglected along the way - he felt the difference
 
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