painting refrigerator

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  #1  
Old 12-03-02, 05:51 AM
Marie1942
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painting refrigerator

Can a refrigerator be successfully painted? If possible can you tell me how to go about it?
 
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Old 12-03-02, 03:39 PM
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Yes. If the surface is smooth, clean it well, lightly sand it with 220 grit paper to roughen the surface, prime and paint. There is an appliance enamel that probably suits this job the best.
 
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Old 12-04-02, 07:41 PM
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Painting appliances

Many forum posters report taking appliances to an auto body shop for repainting.
 
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Old 12-04-02, 07:46 PM
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Ouch! twelvepole, we're supposed to be helping here, that would cost a few to have it painted professionally. I agree with chfite, appliance paint is the way to do it cheap and DIY. Now, you're not going to get a perfect finish with it, and app. paint is not cheap, but a heck of a lot cheaper than having a body shop do it. There are special considerations you have to take before you use app. paint though, make sure you read the label several times.

There is another option also, I don't know how expensive it is, but it might work for you. Electrostatic paint. You have to have this done professionally, but it makes a really nice finish that will last. Basically, it's exactly what it sounds like, the paint and the appliance are electrostatically charged so that the appliance is covered really well and really hard.

Good luck!
 
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Old 12-04-02, 08:04 PM
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Painting refrigerator

Hello, SafeWatch, I was not disapproving of a DIY project. My dad painted many fridges when I was a kid for folks. He was a painter and a carpenter and I was his gopher. Surface prep was a key issue which he always drilled in my head. I was about 8-10 during those years as gopher. I was just providing feedback from my years of cruising the posts on this site and others. Many have reported satisfaction with results from taking appliances to an auto body shop. The electrostatic paints also get positive reviews. Due to limited feedback from forum posters, we tend not to find out much about the results of DIY appliance painting. When surfing the net, many sites recommend local paint store and purchasing the appliance paint if you are going to DIY. I don't know what kind of paint my dad used that many years ago. According to what I read on the net, the electrostatic painting produces the most professional results.
 
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Old 12-04-02, 08:57 PM
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Yeah, I know, I was just jokin with ya. I just think an auto shop is gonna charge an arm and a leg to do it. Lot of prep work involved to use auto paint.
 
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Old 12-04-02, 09:13 PM
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Prep Work

Prep work is the key to any successful paint job.
 
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Old 12-05-02, 04:34 AM
mikejmerritt
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Hello Marie 1942, The best way to do it at home would be to follow the prep steps below but use a conventional (air and a spray gun) rig. Since most don't have this stuff I'll tell you how I do mine and I do have all of this stuff to use. First, you do want to unplug and unload the fridge because as you keep the door open for a while working the inner lips and edges the condensation will cause tape to let go and of course water and spray paint don't mix. You also want all to dry over night with the door propped open to prevent sticking and damage to the gasket. Wipe everything down with mineral spirits (paint thinner) and let dry. Sand with 220 grit sandpaper just enough to get pecks out and dull the finish a little. The wrinkled door need not be sanded just wiped. Dust around the handles and gaskets so tape will bond and tape off anything you don't want paint on using masking tape. If this task will take more than a couple of days use blue painters tape so it will remove. Wipe again with paint thinner. Careful with the thinner because it will lift the tape. At this point you are ready to paint. Without a doubt, Sherwin-Willaims SuperAcrylic Spray Paint is the best I have used and I have used most of them. Don't let the part time help at S/W sell you appliance epoxy because it is just no good for appliances. Odd but true. Spray the first coat as lightly as you can and don't worry about lines or areas that don't cover. The idea with the first couple of coats is to fog in with NO runs. Spray one up and down and the next side to side. With the acrylic paint you MUST recoat each coat with in two hours or the paint will wrinkle the coat under it and you really have a mess. From start to finish you should spray all coats in about 2 hours. They dry in minutes and recoat as soon as possible. I most often spray 5-6 times and it takes about 4-5 cans of paint. I would buy seven because you don't (can't) run out. Take back what you don't use. I have almond, avocado factory finish stuff and some white ones I have done this way and have had body shop friends try to tell the difference and none have been correct beyond normal guessing. Let us know how they come out and good luck!.....Mike
 
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Old 12-06-02, 08:59 PM
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I recently painted an almond refrigerator white. It was the first time I ever did such a thing and I was VERY nervous about ruining a perfectly (almost brand new) refrigerator.

I used Rustoleum Appliance Epoxy, sold at any hardware store (it has pictures of appliances on it). I think it was less tham $4 at the big orange store. (I checked out the S/W product per mikejmerritt's advice, but the clerk at the store didn't know jack about painting appliances and I figured if I was going to ruin the fridge, I might as well do it for less).

Anyway, to the job itself: All I did was wash the fridge with soap and water. I let it dry then lightly sanded. After, I wiped with a damp cloth and let dry completely.

I sprayed the paint at a distance of 12 inches, give or take a couple, and used just enough to cover the original color. Fortunately, and this is what I was most nervous about, I left no drip marks with the first pass. I waited about an hour and then applied a second coat. Unfortunately, one of the cans I used tended to spray "drops" every 10 seconds or so, and that got me real pissed. I don't know if it was for lack of sufficient shaking or a defective product. What I did to correct this was I lightly dipped my fingertip on the drop to flatten it out, and then I applied a light coat over it to blend it in. It worked, but I often had to re-do a whole section in order to get an even coat.

Also, I removed both doors, all handles, screws, etc. This made it easier to do a piece at a time. It also allowed one piece to dry somewhat while I did another. I covered the insides of the doors (the white plastic) using masking tape and newspapers.

In the end, I was VERY happy with the results. My take away's:

1) I think mikjmerritts point about re-coating quickly is right on (why exactly, I don't know), but I had good results with it
2) I was a bit inconsistent in my sanding (anxious to get on with the project ); as a result, you can see a slight difference in some areas as some are "glossier" (where I didn't sand as hard) and others are duller (where I apparently applied more pressure while sanding).
3) this paint goes EVERYWHERE. I painted indoors on a freshly painted concrete floor (also another involved project with much prep work, BTW) and I ruined it. The paint traveled as far as 15 ft from where I was painting!
4) for ease, take apart the fridge, but make sure you know where all the hardware goes as you take them off
5) to be honest, this fridge is a second fridge and thus doesn't get much use, so I'm not dure how the paint job would hold up to the normal use consistent with a primary fridge.

That's my two cents worth. Hope it helps.
 
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