removing paint from plaster walls

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  #1  
Old 01-18-03, 10:33 AM
C
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removing paint from plaster walls

1939 house with plaster walls. Original paint, another coat, current coat. Appears that there was no primer used in between. Current coat appears to be latex. The problem: the paint is alligatoring in places. The failure extends down to the apparent original paint. No pattern or reason, except to say that it appears that something was wiped along the wall, and the paint is failing over these areas. If the area is scraped, feathered with sandpaper, primed with latex kilz and painted, the paint starts to lift in a few minutes. The surface needs to be physically stabilized, then sealed with Zinser BIN, or such.

Obviously, there is nothing to do until I get the old paint off of the walls. The bad areas come off with a scraper up to an edge and the paint appears to stop chipping. If I wait a few minutes, the edge will start coming up so that the scraper will bite into it again. I am looking for a more efficient and effective way to remove the paint than scraping.

There is about 20 square feet of wall to scrape, but the entire hallway ceiling needs to be scraped, 7' x 27'. These are interior walls, no evidence of moisture being a problem. The current paint has been on at least 25 years. The walls and ceiling have previously been washed with TSP and rinsed.

Suggestions as to how to better remove the paint from the walls?
 
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  #2  
Old 01-18-03, 06:20 PM
annie0
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If this were my job, I would not remove the old paint.
You 'could' be getting into lead based paint - not good.
This needs to be either removed professionally, or encapsulated.

I would lightly texture the ceiling. Read past posts on that technique.

For the wall areas I would cover with whats called "bridging material" (do a search on 'bridging material")
It goes on like wallpaper. Once you have installed it, you are ready to either wallpaper, or paint. Seems to be this would be much less labor intesive.
Hope this helps.
 
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Old 01-18-03, 07:19 PM
C
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Thanks for the suggestion on bridging material. I have oftern wondered what that looked like after it was applied. It seems that it would have the appearance of cloth stuck to the wall.

The ceilings in my house are not textured, so that won't suit. Besides, the issue is one of adhesion, not appearance. Perhaps, the bridging material is the best choice.
 
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Old 01-20-03, 01:30 PM
brickeyee
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If you really are worried about lead, have the paint tested. I would be surprised if flat wall paint had lead in it. Most of the lead was used in gloss paints on woodwork to improve the gloss. Chips are not as much of a hazard as powder. If the alligatoring is bad enough and you want to strip it, do a search on lead paint. The removal techniques are not really as horrible as you would think. Cover floor with plastic. Cover walls with plastic. Tape wall sheets to floor sheetsto seal. Wear tyvec coverall and correct mask. Strip. Roll all the plastic back up with the paint chips inside. Some states allow you to do it. Some do not. It would probably be worth the effort.
 
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Old 01-23-03, 10:38 AM
insainity
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Other than a heat gun i cant think of anything that would make this job easier.Bridgeing material humm i hadnt heard of this before.This might be the ticket.
But if it were mine i would try to just scrape of any loose spots and then skim coat with dry wall mud(jiont compound)or maybe plaster patch.I have patched plaster walls with regular dry wall mud before and it worked fine.So i would just mix some thin and skim coat all the problem areas.It might take two light coats.Then sand smooth and prim with paint and finish.After paint is apled to the drywall mud it will absorb it and harden rock hard.This would be the fastest and easiest way to fix it.
 
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Old 01-23-03, 06:10 PM
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What I am doing is to scrape the loose paint, then seal it with Zinsser 123. Next, I plan to skim coat it as needed and sand it out. Then prime and paint.

It is interesting that the paint is failing at the old plaster surface or the surface of the first coat of paint. The subsequent coats are adhering together well. I was amused that someone could apply paint as thinly as the last coat was. Oh well, three coats of paint in 60 years. It could be worse.
 
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Old 01-24-03, 09:07 PM
insainity
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Yea, like you said good thing it is only 3 coats deep.My luck wouldnt have been so good.LOL

Have fun!
 
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Old 01-25-03, 09:40 AM
hy
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removal of paint from plaster

If you use the PEEL AWAY I product it will remove all of the paiunt in one application and you will be at the bare plaster which is a good place to start for any re finishing. The product has been used on State capitols and the like so it will not damage your surface.
 
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