Painting dark stained trim and doors

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  #1  
Old 06-25-03, 08:55 PM
lloyd95
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Painting dark stained trim and doors

I'm going to be painting all the trim and doors white in the home I just bought.

The trim and doors are dark stained pine.

My Questions....

Can I just prime and paint the trim?

And what primer should I use over the stain?

The doors a solid 6 panel....I was thinking of taking them outside and spraying them.

What is a good sprayer to use?

Can I spray primer also?

Should I, once I spray the doors go over it with a brush? (someone told me thats what I'd have to do)

I've never used a sprayer so I'm not familar with how well they work.

Is the overspray bad?
Could I use it inside?


Oh and also....I plan to paint the walls a color and paint all the trim white. Anyone have an idea on what steps to take? I was going to prime the walls and trim (in place) paint the colors and then "carefully" paint the trim.

I suppose the right way would be to take all the trim down. I really dont want to have to do that. Will it turn out ok if I just leave it up?

What kind of tricks are there for painting the trim in place? Or should I paint the trim first then try to mask it off?

And how do I paint pocket doors? I have 3 of them to do. Any clue on how those are removed?

Thanks for any replies....I'm just feeling a little overwelmed with all this and am looking for a little advice
 
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  #2  
Old 06-26-03, 06:41 AM
C
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Can I just prime and paint the trim?

Yes, but I would wash it first with TSP or spic and span, then feather sand any chips in the surface so that it is smooth.

And what primer should I use over the stain?

There are many good primers out there, Zinsser 123 is my favorite.

The doors a solid 6 panel....I was thinking of taking them outside and spraying them.

Excellent idea. It is fast and gives a good finish. Spraying requires some degree of skill, so practice before you start. Make sure the doors are clean, too.

What is a good sprayer to use?

In my experience, the cheap ones do poorly. You may be able to rent a good airless unit locally. Graco is a major brand.

Can I spray primer also?

Spraying primer is beneficial,too, for the same reason.

Should I, once I spray the doors go over it with a brush? (someone told me thats what I'd have to do)

This is called backbrushing. Ordinarily, you do this to work a finish into the rough texture of the substrate, such as rough sawn wood or stucco. I don't do it unless it is needed. Besides, it will give you brush marks that would not be there otherwise with spraying.

I've never used a sprayer so I'm not familar with how well they work.

With practice and a good spray rig the results are excellent.

Is the overspray bad?

Any undesired application of paint is bad. Drop cloths and masking are keys to controlling overspray.

Could I use it inside?

Many spray units are difficult to use neatly and effectively in a house because of the overspray. High pressure units send paint a fair distance. This makes using them inside challenging.


Oh and also....I plan to paint the walls a color and paint all the trim white. Anyone have an idea on what steps to take? I was going to prime the walls and trim (in place) paint the colors and then "carefully" paint the trim.

That is the recommended technique. I paint the trim first, but that's me. Don't forget to caulk the trim and fill any any nail holes.

I suppose the right way would be to take all the trim down. I really dont want to have to do that. Will it turn out ok if I just leave it up?

Taking it down will undoubtedly result in much of it getting broken. That is more trouble than it is worth. I believe that you will find that most paint the trim in place.

What kind of tricks are there for painting the trim in place? Or should I paint the trim first then try to mask it off?

The recommended technique it to paint the walls, then the trim. Use a good quality angled trim brush and take your time. Masking tape is not a panacea. You can still have failures with paint running underneath the tape. It is better to see what is actually happening so you can wipe off anything that is misplaced when it happens. Keep a damp cloth handy.

And how do I paint pocket doors? I have 3 of them to do. Any clue on how those are removed?

They ride on a track mounted at the top. You should be able to lift them off the overhead track and remove them.

Here is a description of the process.

http://doityourself.com/doors/pocketdoor.htm

Here is a look at the hardware.

http://www.johnsonhardware.com/images/pdf/100pd-1.pdf

You could probably paint them in place, if you can reach all of the surface. Some have more space than others.

Hope this helps.
 
  #3  
Old 06-27-03, 11:09 AM
phareous
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I've just done this for a building that was built in 1923. The trick here is you need to sand down all the wood work or the paint won't stick. I've seen the paint peel as early as 6 months. You don't need to take all the stain, etc. off just rought it up. I would use 100 grit or 150 grit and an electric sander to rough down the doors. Then put some primer on (like Killz), and then 2 coats of your final. Also if you tape everything up you shouldn't need to remove anything. Also you may need to patch any holes and possibly caulk where the woodwork meets each other and the wall...its not very obvious when its a dark stain but when you put light paint all that stuff will stick out like a sore thumb.
 
  #4  
Old 06-29-03, 08:58 PM
lloyd95
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thanks for the replies
 
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