5 yr old unopened paint. Still good?


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Old 08-03-03, 09:47 PM
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5 yr old unopened paint. Still good?

I came across several gallons of Ralph Lauren Semi-gloss interior paint in the garage of a house that I'll be renovating soon. The sticker on the lid says that the paint was prepared in June 1998. Since the cans feel full and there are no paint drips on the side, I assume the paint has never been used and hasn't seen the light of day for just over 5 years. Do you think it might still be usable? I'd hate to throw it away if it still has life left in it. What are the consequences/drawbacks if you do use paint that is old? Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 08-03-03, 10:58 PM
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If its been in a garage, the odds are its frozen at least once. If thats the case, its shot.

Shake a can up real good, pop it open. If it smeels real bad, you'll know. Try to brush some out on a board or something. If it flows smooth, dries nice, then its good.

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Old 08-03-03, 11:00 PM
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If it has never been opened, it is probably still good. I would have it shaken by machine. If after it is shaken, it still looks unmixed, I would discard it. Also watch for thick skin in the paint or lots of lumps. With those, I would discard it, too.

If it looks good after mechnical shaking, it would be worth using.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 08-04-03, 05:11 AM
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Depends on where he is as to whether it may have frozen in the past. I could store paint in my garage and h*ll will freeze over before the paint ever does, LOL.

Prowall - What makes "bad" paint smell bad? Or is that one of life's great mysteries? Just curious.

In the early days of my military career when we would requisition materials for repainting we would often get paint in cans that looked like it was left over from the Spanish-American War (this was the Marine Corps, of course, so it probably WAS Navy surplus from that era). Never had any trouble, but it was often oil-based paint, which I'm guessing may be more tolerant of long storage?
 
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Old 08-04-03, 07:28 AM
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What makes "bad" paint smell bad? Or is that one of life's great mysteries? Just curious.
Lets hope it was not the last painter to use it who obviously couldnt be bothered to use one flight of stairs and then use the toilet...Doesn`t bare thinking about does it!!Whats worse is that he actually has the gaul to blame it on the frost!!
 
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Old 08-04-03, 02:41 PM
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What makes "bad" paint smell bad? Or is that one of life's great mysteries? Just curious
No idea. A chemist could probably say, most likely the ingredients seperating, the resins evaporating out of the mix, don't really know. But you can definitely smell that its bad.

As for oil, I know it has a much lower freeze-point than water. I've had a couple gallons of gloss oil trim paint that got below 20 degrees more than once, but wass still good. Had to thin it a little, turned into maple syrup consistency, but dried down nicely.

I know when my wallpaper adhesive sits in my truck in the summer, it doesn't go bad but puts off a potent ammonia odor.

All life's great mysteries. Maybe I should ask my wife, she says she knows everything.
 
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Old 08-10-03, 12:39 PM
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Thanks for the info, guys... its a big help!
 
 

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