Drywall damage from wallpaper...


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Old 08-12-03, 05:56 AM
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Drywall damage from wallpaper...

Wallpaper is applied over the bare drywall about 20 years ago and now I am stuck removing it, what a mess.

The paper came of very easy with a steamer, but the past is a different story. I used the DIF product, but it did very little. Then I used the vinegar solution (1 part vinegar, 2 parts water), it was better, but not great. Anywhere there is drywall compound the glue comes off easily, but so does the drywall compound!

I know I will have to patch (skim) and prime these areas, no big deal. The problem I have it while removing the paste, the paper of the drywall has become torn. I have heard of some type of product called Gardz that is used for this problem.

Is there a better product for this?

What are the steps?

Here is my guess:

Remove wallpaper and paste
Apply Gardz (or similar product)
Patch(skim coat) and repair the drywall.
Prime (oil or latex?)
Finish coat

I assume that I do not use bare drywall primer/sealer as over the Gardz.

Also, this is a dining room. The wallpaper was from the chair rail to the ceiling. The part under the chair rail has several coats of paint. Do I use a primer over that too? It is a dark green.

Thanks for any help!
 
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Old 08-12-03, 09:37 AM
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Lol!! I literaly have the SAME exact problem in my breezway, well for that matter my whole house. What I have done in other rooms in my house is to wet the paste down with hot water and the DIF solution. Let it sit for 10 minutes. Apply more of the solution and immediately start GENTLY scraping with a putty knife. If it was like mine the paste will come off in gobs. After this is complete let the walls dry completely. With a heavy duty sponge (I use the type for grout wiping) use the solution again and scrub and left over residue. Let wall dry completely again a use a different sponge and clean water to get rid of DIF. I usualy repeat this a second time after letting wall dry. You will notice that the paper from the shetrock will ball up a bit from all of this water and solution, this is why I let the wall dry between turns, to lessen the amount. After you are complete then scimcoat the wall and prime. Prime with an oil based primer/seeler such as Sherwin Williams Pro-Block. This will seel in any little left over glue residue you may have missed. If the wall was in bad shape ou may want to use 2 coats of primer. After priming is complete wipe the area with your hand to fel for any left over balls of paper and pick them off. Then paint 2 coats with a good quality latex. Good luck, I know it's a lot but doing it right this time around will save a million headaches down the road!!
 
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Old 08-12-03, 12:54 PM
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Greetings, removers of wallpaper,

Wallpaper is such a nuisance to remove when the walls were not prepared beforehand.

Removing all the glue is the best course of action. Let the wallboard dry between work sessions, so as to not tear up the paper surface too much. When it is clean and repaired, prime it with a good quality primer sealer. I prefer Zinsser 123, but others have their favorites. This will stabilize any flaws in the surface such as fuzzies. After this dries, you can knock down the small irregularities with some 150 grit sandpaper. Proceed from there. If you have to use more joint compound after you prime, be sure to prime over the joint compound before painting. This will ensure uniform appearance of the finish.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 08-12-03, 01:00 PM
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I guess I was making the drywal paper too wet while trying to remove the paste.

So I will do it in two passes and hopefully this will be better.

So just prime with the 1-2-3, not the Gardz?

I have alot of bare drywall primer that I bought for the ceilings since I have been scraping the accoustical crap off as I do each room.

What is the difference between 1-2-3 and bare drywall primer?

I do know that the bare drywall primer says not to use over previously painted surfaces.
 
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Old 08-12-03, 01:59 PM
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Bare drywall primer is usually PVA primer. PVA primer is meant for new drywall, not what you have. Gardz is just a higher caliber product for drywall. 123 is a general purpose primer-sealer. Either would be fine for what you are doing as well. I suspect that the scraped ceilings would be better treated with something other than PVA primer since they are not new.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 08-12-03, 02:20 PM
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Yes, it is PVA primer. That's what the knucklhead at HD said I needed after I explained to him what I was doing!

It is not new, but it is bare drywall. I have used it in 3 rooms so far, and I did not have any problems except for crappy skim coating!!!!
 
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Old 08-21-03, 01:33 AM
hwm54112
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I have found that when the driwall paper has been torn or removed, if you apply any water based material to it you are likely to get additional bubbling of the remaining layers of driwall paper. I always prime all torn or damaged driwall surfaces with a shellac based primer (such as Bin or Zinzer) before applying any water based product including joint compound for skim coating. A friend recently tore off large sections of driwall paper along with the wallpaper. As a fix, she applied "repair" type wallpaper which is meant to cover major defects or to be applied to paneling to hide the grooves, etc. Since the wall was in such rough shape, I attempted to skim coat it withour priming it and even the repair type paper bubbled right up. After that, I went back to priming everything first with the shellaq based primer and have had no problems since.
 
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Old 08-21-03, 05:03 AM
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one of my pet peeves ---

too many so-called "professional" paper hangars won't (or don't know how) to properly prepare a wall for wallpaper. We're going to see more of this with all the new homes built in the last 10-15 years. Many are painted with "builders paint". The h/o hire someone to hang the paper (or just diy) and put it up right over this "paint".
 
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Old 08-21-03, 06:53 AM
brickeyee
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I have always used an alkyd (oil) primer to protect patches in plaster and drywall, and under wallpaper. The latex top coats come out even since the water is not sucked out of them into the wall material (no 'flat' spots). Latex allows vapor through and does not form as impervoius a film as alkyd. Shellac is also softened by water and so I have stayed away from shellac based products.
 
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Old 08-21-03, 01:46 PM
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What BobF said is right on. Too many station-wagon painters think they can hang paper. HA HA.

For TEARS in drywall, I use DrawTite, made by Scotch Paints in California. Gardz is very similar and works great too. Seal torn areas with Gardz, skim out, re-prime with Gardz, then prime ALL the walls with a heavy-bodied, slow drying alkyd enamel underbody. Allow to dry a couple days, lightly sand, and voila! you have a brand new wall to start with.

After paper is removed, I ALWAYS prime with an oil-based product, wallpaper adhesive can and will soak in the pores of cheap latex paint and drywall making it impossible to completely wash off or remove. If you choose the easy latex route, you are inviting problems in the future.
 
 

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