poor prep job...

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  #1  
Old 08-28-03, 06:16 AM
gettingstarted
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poor prep job...

My in-laws "helped" us move into our new home (1924 construction) by prepping the dining room for new paint. In my novice opinion, gleaned largely from these boards, I think they made some grave errors.

Unbeknownst to me, after stripping the wallpaper from the plaster walls, they removed some (but not all) of the wall paper glue, and primed with Kilz 2 latex primer. My husband and I wanted to paint this weekend, but I'm not sure if we should undo any of the previous work.

1. Is Kilz 2 primer as poor quality as their paint? With primer, does it matter so much?
2. Are we going to regret having latex primer over wall paper glue, and/or over plaster walls?
3. Should we undo anything? What will the consequences of poor prepping be, and when?
4. I wanted to use SW latex SuperPaint, unless you have a better recommendation?

Thanks so much!
 
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Old 08-28-03, 06:56 AM
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1. Is Kilz 2 primer as poor quality as their paint? With primer, does it matter so much?
I haven't found anything that Kilz2 performs well on. Yes I believe primer is a very important step in painting. It is the foundation of the paint job. You wouldn't build a brick house on a paper-mache foundation. No matter how good the finish paint is, prep and priming will determine how it will look and last.



2. Are we going to regret having latex primer over wall paper glue, and/or over plaster walls?
Yes, wallpaper adhesive does BAD things to latex products.



3. Should we undo anything? What will the consequences of poor prepping be, and when?
Probably too hard to UNDO, but I'd sand the walls and remove the dust and clean them. Then prime with an oil-based primer that has penetrating qualities. The consequences of poor/improper prep may be evident immediately or may not show up for a while, you just can't tell.



4. I wanted to use SW latex SuperPaint, unless you have a better recommendation?
I think SuperPaint is super, go for it. If you use one that has a sheen, like eggshell, satin, etc. make sure walls are nice and smooth, and two finish coats usually look best.

Hope this helped.
 
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Old 08-29-03, 06:22 AM
gettingstarted
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Thanks for the reassurance.

Now then... a few more questions:

What's the purpose of sanding--just to rough up the surface a little for surface bonding, or to encourage some penetration, or something else? What grit paper do you recommend?

I've never sanded a space this large before. What's the right technique/equipment? Are we talking blocks and extension poles, or would life be a lot better with some power equipment? (--and if so, what kind?)

And finally, can you recommend a particular make and model of primer, with those "penetrating qualities?"

Thanks again.
 
  #4  
Old 08-29-03, 06:42 AM
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One of the objectives should be to remove the wallpaper glue. Sanding off the glue is the first step at the stage where it has been primed over. After the paint is off the glue, use warm water or wallpaper remover to remove the remainder of the glue. Paint and primer won't bond well to it. Failure to remove the adhesive can result in failure at an uncertain time in the future.

Sanding can smooth any irregular areas. I would start with 100 grit sandpaper. It cuts fast without leaving big scratches. Follow up with 150 grit paper.

After the wall dries, prime with a top quality sealer - primer, such as: Zinsser 123. There are other primers out there, but I don't use them and cannot evaluate them.

Zinsser 123 does an excellent job on plaster walls, in my experience.

Sanding blocks will probably be enough, unless the adhesive covers a large area. Then sanding poles or power sanders (not belt sanders) would make the work go faster and reduce operator fatigue and grumpiness.

Flat paints generally do a good job of concealing irregularities in the surface of the wall.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 08-29-03, 07:13 AM
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When I referred to sanding the walls, I wasn't sanding to remove anything, just make them smooth. It would probably be next to impossible to sand off glue that has been primered already.

As for the primer, Zinsser 123 is an excellent product, but being water-based, is not an excellent choice for this application. Choose a heavy-bodied, slow drying oil-based primer to ensure sealing in of all glue residue. This type product will also keep the wall from 're-wetting' when applying spackle, joint compound, paint, etc., in effect, creating a new, stable surface to work with.
A couple brands that come to mind and are fairly easy to find are Ben. Moore's Alkyd Enamel Underbody, Sherwin Williams Pro Block, & Porter's Easy Hide Alkyd Exterior Primer.

Remember, avoid ones that claim 'fast drying' and 'stain-killing'. You are trying to lock down, not cover stains or odors, and if it dries real fast, it has no time to penetrate and become 'one' with the wall.

It is always harder to redo something that has been done wrong than doing it right in the first place.
 
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