Sherwin Williams paint Question


  #1  
Old 08-29-03, 12:39 PM
textucker
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Question Sherwin Williams paint Question

I just bought some "ProClassic" paint to paint my kitchen cabinets and was told to use "Floetrol" which is a Latex Paint Conditioner. I told the man at Sherwin Williams that I was worried about brush strokes and he told me to use "Floetrol" to thin the paint which will give the paint a smoother finish. He said that that is what the pro painters use when doing kitchen cabinets. He said that if I use water it could break down the paint and it won't do as well as far as cracking and chipping goes?? is this true? Please let me know if I got bad advice. Do I really need Floetrol or will just the ProClassic work?

Thank you so much
 
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Old 08-29-03, 01:16 PM
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"roll on and lay off"

With Proclassic, I just rolled it on with a mohair roller, then brushed out smooth with a 3" poly/nylon sash brush.

I've never thinned paint for brushing with Floetrol, I use that for spraying. But if you must thin it, Floetrol would be better than water.
 

Last edited by prowallguy; 02-18-04 at 04:06 PM.
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Old 08-29-03, 01:21 PM
textucker
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With Proclassic, I just rolled it on with a mohair roller, then brushed out smooth with a 3" poly/nylon sash brush.


I don't understand why you would roll out the paint then brush it? What is a mohair roller and a sash brush? LOL, I just use paint and any ol' brush or roller. I have 100% poly brushes would that do? I want to do the best job so any advice would be wonderful.

Thanks
 
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Old 08-29-03, 02:26 PM
textucker
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With Proclassic, I just rolled it on with a mohair roller, then brushed out smooth with a 3" poly/nylon sash brush.


I don't understand why you would roll out the paint then brush it? What is a mohair roller and a sash brush? LOL, I just use paint and any ol' brush or roller. I have 100% poly brushes would that do? I want to do the best job so any advice would be wonderful.

Thanks
 
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Old 08-29-03, 04:08 PM
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Its called 'rolling it on and laying it off'

This is a method used to paint sides, pieces, or specific areas of objects to be painted.

Its the best way I know to paint 6-panel doors, cabinets, windows, etc. fast and accurately. It allows you to paint a whole door in latex on a hot day and finish it before any starts drying. This eliminates brush strokes where overlapping fresh paint and drying paint.

Take for example the cabinet door. A mohair nap ( very short nap, 1/8 or so, made to apply very thin, smooth coat without stipple or bubbles) on a 7" roller frame works best. 100% poly brush should be fine, just dip it into the paint and brush a little something out, get the paint loaded into the bristles. Roll the entire cabinet door face with paint, then take brush and brush it in, the corners, whatever needs to be coated. Then take the brush, use a back-hand stroke, and gently just lay it on the surface at one end, and pull the brush down the surface. Using long, even strokes from one end of the door to the other. Don't stop in the middle. Always start and stop on an end. And make sure you aren't letting it puddle up on the opposite side of the door edges.

Doing this properly will leave a nice finish, virtually stroke-free.
A good brush goes along way. ProClassic works well with this technique, I even have a cabinet I painted with ProClassic like this on my website.

Hope this helped and didn't confuse you. Its kinda hard to type it rather than show it.
 
  #6  
Old 08-31-03, 05:44 AM
hambone7731
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Wink

One thing that is very important is not don't put latex over oil base paint. I see this almost on a daily basis. Paint stores rarely ask poeple What kind of paint they are going over.This is one key to getting the best end result. Once someone has put latex over oil it is expensive to straighten out and usually requires a profesional stripping. Most do it yourselfers prefer to use latex because of the easy clean up. BUT oil looks better in the end.
Use a 100% china brisle brush.(pricey but worth it). I don't usually use a roller on cabinets because there is not much flat surface. I just brush it all.(more controlible less mess).


Oil paint will always lay down better(show less brush marks).
If you want even better results use Penatrol.(oil version of flotrol)
Don't forget when useing oil base your going to need mineral spirits to clean yourself and your tools.
You CAN use latex over oil but you must apply oil prime in between.


Hope this helps.


 
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Old 08-31-03, 06:36 AM
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One thing that is very important is not don't put latex over oil base paint.

You CAN use latex over oil but you must apply oil prime in between
Use a 100% china brisle brush
Oil paint will always lay down better(show less brush marks).
If you want even better results use Penatrol.(oil version of flotrol)
RIGHT ON!!!

The ONLY drawback to oil is it yellows faster than latex.
 
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Old 08-31-03, 07:23 AM
hambone7731
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Thumbs up

You have to weigh it out.oil verses latex. They both have ups and downs. The yellowing is a real problem to be concidered.
Caused by the potroleum in oil resin coming to the surface due to lack of sunlight ( notice inside of doors yellow worse than outside). When concidering using oil base check for zink content, this is what curbs the yellowing process. Some Hometown paint stores can add zink. Some offer NON YELLOWING enamel but even this will yellow over time.


Note : The higher the gloss off oil paint, the worse it yellows. I recomend semi gloss.
 
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Old 08-31-03, 06:56 PM
textucker
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Thanks guys,

The only problem is that I don't know if it is oil based or latex on the cabinets now. How could I find out? I hope it is latex because I have already done 4 doors although wont take long to redo them. I bought a purdy brush at Lowes 50/50 blend.

I haven't opened that paint that I bought at Sherwin Williams yet so I could take it back if I need to. I hate to use Oil based paint because of the smell and the clean up, but will if it will turn out the best. How long does it usually take for the yellowing to start?

Thanks for all of your help,
 
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Old 08-31-03, 08:25 PM
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Use a rag, soaked in denatured alcohol and scrub on a small spot, about 1sq. inch. If its acrylic, the alcohol will dissolve some and pick up some of the paint. If its alkyd, the alcohol will have no effect at all.
 
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Old 09-01-03, 05:23 PM
textucker
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Hi Prowallguy,
I didn't have any of that alcohol you mentioned so I used finger nail polish remover and it took the paint right off. So does that tell us anything? I'm sure you know this but the nail polish is Acetone and Denatonium Benzoate.

Should I get the alcohol still and if so where do I find it?

Thanks,
Darla
 
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Old 09-01-03, 05:56 PM
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Acetone is pretty potent stuff, but I'd bet you got latex if it came off fairly easy.
 
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Old 09-02-03, 07:53 PM
textucker
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Thanks, off to paint cabinets then.
 
  #14  
Old 09-03-03, 03:47 AM
mikejmerritt
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ProClassic waterborne will bond to most anything so you should be good to go......Mike
 
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Old 09-03-03, 06:54 PM
textucker
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Thanks guys for all of your help.
I started painting today and so far it looks great

thanks again,
 
 

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